Oil drops almost 2 to US10739 as fears of military intervention in

AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email by The Associated Press Posted Sep 10, 2013 1:29 pm MDT NEW YORK, N.Y. – Oil dropped nearly two per cent Tuesday as support grew behind a plan for Syria to cede possession of its chemical weapons in a move to avoid a potential U.S. military strike.Benchmark West Texas Intermediate crude for October delivery fell $2.13, or 1.9 per cent, to close at US$107.39 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. It was the biggest one-day decline in three weeks.Oil prices have been at elevated levels for two weeks following President Barack Obama’s call for military action against the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad in retaliation for what the White House says was a chemical weapons attack against civilians.But on Tuesday, a diplomatic solution seemed at hand after Syria said it had accepted a deal pushed by Russia — and based on comments by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry — to put its chemical weapons under international control for their later dismantling.As the Syrian situation develops, traders will be also monitoring fresh information on U.S. stockpiles of crude and refined products.Data for the week ended Sept. 6 are expected to show declines of two million barrels in crude oil stocks and one million barrels in gasoline stocks, according to a survey of analysts by Platts, the energy information arm of McGraw-Hill Cos.A report on stockpiles from the U.S. Energy Department’s Energy Information Administration — the market benchmark — will be out on Wednesday.Brent, the benchmark for international crudes, dropped $2.47, or 2.2 per cent, to US$111.25 per barrel on the ICE Futures exchange in London.In other energy futures trading on Nymex, wholesale gasoline fell seven cents to US$2.74 a U.S. gallon (3.79 litres), heating oil lost five cents to US$3.07 a gallon and natural gas lost two cents to US$3.58 per 1,000 cubic feet.(TSX:ECA), (TSX:IMO), (TSX:SU), (TSX:HSE), (NYSE:BP), (NYSE:COP), (NYSE:XOM), (NYSE:CVX), (TSX:CNQ), (TSX:TLM), (TSX:COS.UN), (TSX:CVE) Oil drops almost 2% to US$107.39 as fears of military intervention in Syria ease read more

Twerking request to womens soccer star had serious consequences

The head of a major Canadian women’s sports organization feels a DJ continued a disturbing trend by asking soccer star Ada Hegerberg to twerk after receiving an international award.Allison Sandmeyer-Graves, the CEO of the Canadian Association for the Advancement of Women and Sport and Physical Activity, was disappointed French DJ Martin Solveig made the request to Hegerberg after the Norwegian became the first woman to win the Ballon d’Or. The award for top soccer player in the world added recognition for women for the first time on Monday in Paris.“I think the message that women get everywhere in society, but very much in sport, very much where bodies are on display, is that what your body looks like is more important than what your body can do,” Sandmeyer-Graves said. “She just reached the highest pinnacle of accomplishment in a sporting career, and was reduced to just what her body looks like. And with no acknowledgment of her strength and power and skill and strategic mind, and all of those sorts of things that could be highlighted in the moment.“Research shows that women get four per cent of mainstream media coverage in an Olympic year. Women just aren’t visible on our TVs and in our print media, and when they do show up, this is so often how they get presented.“This does just keep happening over and over and over again, and it really speaks to just how normalized it is for people to view women through this lens.”Solveig apologized for the question, tweeting, “I didn’t know that this could be seen as such an offence,” and adding: “This was a joke, probably a bad one.”Sandmeyer-Graves didn’t see the humour.“How often do women need to forgive this sort of thing? No, actually, it wasn’t funny. And it had serious consequences,” she said. “People don’t understand just how much this impacts the big picture of women in sport and girls and how they view themselves, and how they feel about what it means to be out in the world.”Tennis star Andy Murray also was critical of Solveig.“Another example of the ridiculous sexism that still exists in sport,” Murray wrote on Instagram.The twerk request was similar to a question posed to Canadian tennis player Eugenie Bouchard at the Australian Open in 2015.A male presenter conducting an on-court interview with Bouchard at the Grand Slam tournament asked Bouchard to “give us a twirl.”“A twirl?” the native of Westmount, Que., asked.“A twirl, like a pirouette, here you go,” coaxed her interviewer, urging the Wimbledon runner-up to show the crowd her outfit, a pink skirt and top with bright yellow straps.Somewhat uncomfortably, the then-No. 7-ranked player twirled. Then she laughed and buried her face in her hands.“It was very unexpected,” Bouchard said afterward.“I don’t know, an old guy asking you to twirl. It was funny.” — with files from Canadian Press sports reporter Lori Ewing and The Associated PressThe Canadian Press read more