A wish ‘to feel normal’

first_img Sponsored Content By The Penny Hoarder Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Published 8:56 pm Friday, October 15, 2010 Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits By Jaine Treadwell Having cystic fibrosis isn’t a random thing. It’s something that Cassie has to deal with day after day and night after night.“The nights are usually the worst,” she said. “Most of the time I don’t sleep and I’m tired in the mornings and sleep a lot during the day. And, I have to do things perfectly to stay healthy. It’s hard to do and sometimes I break down and cry.”But Cassie doesn’t feel sorry for herself very long. She knows that she “has it” much better than many of the friends she has made at Children’s Hospital in Birmingham.“Cystic fibrosis affects people different ways,” she said. “It affects your lungs and your stomach. It has affected my stomach more but now that I’m older, 18, I have more issues with my lungs. But, I’m stronger than most people that have the disease.” The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthMost 10 Rarest Skins for FortniteTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day “What a beautiful name for such a terrible disease.”Cassie said although the disease is terrible, life is beautiful – as beautiful as “sixty-five roses.”“That’s why I got the tattoo,” Cassie said. “It’s a purple ribbon with a rose in the middle that is a symbol of ‘sixty-five roses,’” she said. “When I was thinking about getting a tattoo, I didn’t want some random tattoo. I wanted one that meant something. I wanted something that would be with me forever. My tattoo is sentimental.” Cassie and the CF friends that she has met at Children’s compare notes on Facebook about medications and health issues and other things, too.“We are curious about each other and what their lives are like,” Cassie said. “It would be good to have those friends around because we have so much in common, but we can’t be together. We are only contagious to each other. There are certain bugs that we can swap back and forth and swapping makes some of them stronger. But it would be nice to be real friends.”Cassie attended private kindergarten and then public school before being home-schooled.Her days were much the same as she took her morning pills and did her aerosol treatment and then put on the chest therapy vest that shakes her to help clear her lungs. The same procedure was repeated in late afternoon.The rest of the day was hers to sleep, play the guitar and drums and bond with the computer.“I’m in the hospital a lot of the time so I don’t have time to make a lot of friends,” Cassie said. “But my best friend has always been my sister, Christan. She understands me the best. She’s a good person and, if I didn’t have her, I don’t know if I could go through each day.”There is an 11-month age difference between the sisters, and Christan is the older. The sisters are attending Wallace College in Dothan together.Christan is studying speech pathology and Cassie’s interest is cosmetology.“I wanted to be a nurse but I knew that I would have to be in the hospital every six to eight week and I would miss a lot of classes and not be able to catch up,” Cassie said. “But I had always been interested in cosmetology so that’s what I’m studying and I really like it.”Cassie attends class on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and now, she working the other days.She now has a job at Brooke’s Beauty Salon in Troy.“I’m excited about working,” she said. “I do shampoos, make appointments and clean up and it’s a good way for me to learn more about cosmetology. I don’t work much so I don’t make a lot but a little is enough for me. I want to make enough to buy a laptop to use when I’m in the hospital.”The hospital is a second home to Cassie and she is close to several of the nurses and staff members so, along with her CF friends, she has an extended family at Children’s Hospital.Her mom, dad, brother and other family members are caring, loving and supportive. They keep her spirits high bringing joy to her life.And, the closeness she and her sister share is extra special. They have formed a mutual admiration society.Cassie calls her disease “sixty-five roses” her sister shows her how beautiful life is, even those a terrible disease has invaded her body.“Christan takes me with her and we hang out with friends and have such a good time,” Cassie said. “And, we have fun just being together. I don’t know what I would do without her.”And, the feeling is mutual.“We are really best friends,” Christan said. “Even when we were little, we were best friends but I didn’t understand about CF. But, when Cassie was in the hospital, I would go and stay with her and try to make it as much fun as possible.”Now that Christan is older, she understands that “sixty-five roses” is a terrible disease and she takes her sister under her wing.“Cassie is the toughest person I know,” she said. “I don’t know how she could go through so much. When I don’t feel good or things aren’t going my way, I think about Cassie and see her smile and that changes things for me. She has to go through so much and still she is happy. She is my inspiration.”Christan is excited about Cassie’s work opportunity because it is bringing her so much happiness.“Cassie never wakes up feeling good,” she said. “I want her to know what it feels like to wake up and feel good. If I had only one wish, it would be that – for her to know what it’s like to feel good. I wish that so much.” Cassie Buffy, right, and her sister, Christian are best friends, whose time together helps the Pike County teen cope with the daily struggles of life with cystistic fibrosis, a debilitating disease. Cassie says her one wish in life would be to know just one day with a “normal body.” They are attending Wallace Community College in Dothan, where Cassie is studying cosmetology. (Submitted Photo)If Cassie Buffy could have anything in the world that she wanted, it would be to know for “one day – just one day” what it feels like to be a “normal body.”Cassie was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis when she was five months old. But it wasn’t until she was 10 years old that she really realized what a terrible disease it is.Most children misspeak the disease and say instead, “sixty-five roses.” Book Nook to reopen A wish ‘to feel normal’ You Might Like Bluegrass party keeps ’em coming Rex Locklar jokes that he can’t keep the fans away from his annual bluegrass festival at Henderson. The event draws… read more Latest Stories Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Skip Print Article Email the authorlast_img read more

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Yule “Chief” Vernatt

first_imgYule “Chief” Vernatt, 73, of Sunman passed away Saturday, September 12, 2020 at Christ Hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio.  He was born Wednesday, August 20, 1947 in Huntington, West Virginia, the son of the late Mary (Guinn) and Thomas Vernatt.  He married Sharon Beach on August 21, 1970 and she preceded him in death on March 25, 2018.  Chief served his country in the U.S. Army 1st Infantry Division and was a member of the Sunman American Legion Post #337.  He worked for Marathon as a research technician and enjoyed meeting old friends from work for holiday meals.  He also enjoyed old time tv shows; going to casino’s; and traveling.Chief is survived by his companion Patricia Engle of Sunman; daughter Kimberly (Todd) Plymale of Sunman; brother Thomas “Tom” Vernatt of Belleville, Michigan; and grandchildren Makayla, Colton, and Montana Plymale.  He was preceded in death by his parents, Mary and Thomas, and wife Sharon.A service celebrating his life will be held 11 AM Thursday, September 17, 2020 at Laws-Carr-Moore Funeral Home in Milan with Pastor Charles Miller officiating.  Burial will follow in St. Paul Methodist Cemetery, with full military rites provided by the Sunman American Legion Post #337.  Family and friends may gather to remember Chief from 9 – 11 AM Thursday also at the funeral home.  Memorials may be given in honor of Chief to the Ripley Crossing Activity Fund.  Laws-Carr-Moore Funeral Home entrusted with arrangements, 707 S Main Street, Box 243, Milan, IN 47031, (812) 654-2141.  Please reach out through our website at www.lawscarrmoore.com to leave an online condolence message or a memory of Chief for the family.  Due to the Governor’s mandate, social distancing should be observed, and masks must be worn inside of the funeral home.last_img read more