Scoreboard roundup — 4/26/19

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailiStock(NEW YORK) — Here are the scores from Friday’s sports events:INTERLEAGUEN.Y. Yankees 7, San Francisco 3AMERICAN LEAGUEToronto 4, Oakland 2Cleveland 6, Houston 3Minnesota 6, Baltimore 1Chi White Sox 12, Detroit 11L.A. Angels 5, Kansas City 1Seattle 5, Texas 4, 11 InningsNATIONAL LEAGUESan Diego 4, Washington 3Philadelphia 4, Miami 0Milwaukee 10, N.Y. Mets 2Colorado 8, Atlanta 4Cincinnati 12, St. Louis 1Arizona 8, Chicago Cubs 3L.A. Dodgers 6, Pittsburgh 2NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION PLAYOFFSGolden State 129, L.A. Clippers 110NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE PLAYOFFSOT Carolina 1, N.Y. Islanders 0San Jose 5, Colorado 2Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. Beau Lund Written bycenter_img April 27, 2019 /Sports News – National Scoreboard roundup — 4/26/19last_img read more

Trail Mix – September 2018

first_img Embed Audio PlayerSammy BrueDown With DesperationUse Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.00:000:00 / 2:29 3:34 Shy Of Shameless Chad Elliott And The Redemptions My Blue Ridge Mountain Home Tyler Grant & Robin Kessinger 4:46 3:01 Cold Night The Last Bison 5:09 3:27 2:24 3:02 4:18 Drink From The Bottle The Lark And The Loon Nerva And Dumbo Robert Walter’s 20th Congress Liza Courtney Hartman & Taylor Ashton 3:04 More Lovin’ Mandy Barnett 3:25 Salim Nourallah, a Dallas based singer/songwriter, has taken a bit of an unconventional approach as he prepares to share his latest release, Somewhere South of Sane, with the world.Nourallah has been introducing fans, new and old alike, to a song per day via various social platforms during the lead up to the September 28th release of the new double album. Trail Mix is excited to be involved, as the launch of our September mix marks the debut of Nourallah’s “Whiteheart.”Regarding the song, Nourallah offers that it embodies his approach to his new record.“It hangs in the air, as if it’s been suspended in outer space. I challenge you, sweet listener, to find the beat. Listen as closely as you wish. There isn’t one. This is the song in which I fully embrace and accept that Somewhere South of Sane has nothing at all to do with dropping or relying on beats. In fact, you can even call it my anti-beat record, if you’d like. I didn’t deliberately set out to make a drum-free record, though. It just turns out that the kind of songs I’d been writing over the past three years didn’t strike me as calling out for them.”Trail Mix is happy to be a part of this ambitious plan to bring listeners each and every song on Somewhere South of Sane. To keep up with the release of the rest of the album’s tracks, be sure to follow Salim Nourallah on Twitter.Lots of other good stuff awaits on this month’s Trail Mix. Check out brand new tunes from Robert Walter’s 20th Congress, Sammy Brue, Mandy Barnett, Malcolm Holcombe,  The Cody Sisters Band, Nobody’s Girl, Brother Reverend, decker., Nate Smith, Chad Elliot & The Redemptions, Benjamin Jason Douglas, Thomas Cassell, Wes Charlton, Tyler Grant & Robin Kessinger, Courtney Hartman & Taylor Ashton, The Lark & The Loon, Eddie Heinzelman, and Bob Bradshaw.Stay tuned to the Trail Mix blog this month,too. Chats with The Last Bison, Tyler Grant, and Wes Charlton are on deck.And did you like what you hear? If you did – even if it was just one track – get out there and buy some of this music. Grab a concert ticket or a tee shirt. Show these tremendous artists who make Trail Mix what it is each and every month a little love and support. They will certainly appreciate it. 5:12 4:30 Another Hand Brother Reverend 3:50 5:23 Track 5 Comeback Kid Wes Charlton 4:21 Riding Out The Storm Nobody’s Girl 4:54 Gloria Benjamin Jason Douglas 3:58 Fireside Thomas Cassell 2:59 2:29 Medicine Eddie Heinzelman Burnin Grass decker. Umbrella The Cody Sisters Band 3:43 Whiteheart Salim Nourallah Copy and paste this code to your site to embed. Albuquerque Bob Bradshaw Down With Desperation Sammy Brue A Girl Named America Nate Smith last_img read more

Former Laker Steve Nash enjoying retirement, mentoring Jordan Clarkson

first_img“I was in a really difficult position mentally and emotionally,” Nash said. “It wasn’t easy for me. I think the best thing for everyone was for me to get away.”Both Lakers general manager Mitch Kupchak and coach Byron Scott publicly supported Nash’s indefinite absence. But they also expressed hope he would mentor the Lakers’ backcourt, namely rookie guard Jordan Clarkson. Yet, Nash did not begin those private sessions until late January.“As soon as they asked me to help, I was there to help,” Nash said. “It wasn’t like I was hiding. They asked me if I would work with the guys and I immediately said, ‘Yeah.’”Nash has since worked out with Clarkson through both informal workouts and film study.“I tried to give him tips on creating space for himself,” Nash said of Clarkson. “If he creates space for himself, space will open up for him to pass the ball. Then the decisions will become clearer and easier to make.”Nash advised Lakers rookie forward Julius Randle on tweaking his shooting mechanic. Nash also helped Lakers forward Ryan Kelly become more fluid with his movement after nursing overlapping hamstring injuries that kept him out last season for a combined 30 games. But plenty of Nash’s mentorship focused on Clarkson, who averaged 15.8 points on 45.8 percent shooting, five assists and 4.2 rebounds in 32.1 minutes through 38 starts. “He’s got a lot of ingredients to be a terrific NBA player,” Nash said of Clarkson. “The sky’s the limit. He has great size and athleticism. He can score and hit big shots. He’s developing into a good playmaker.” Both Kupchak and Scott also hope Clarkson develops into a leader. “The biggest thing about a leader is being authentic, being yourself and having pure motives,” Nash said. “If you are there every day, working hard and trying to get better and lay it on the line every night, that’s leadership. Whether you’re a vocal leader or quiet leader, it’s about your teammates believing in you, trusting that your motives are pure and trying to win.”After fulfilling that job description on the hardwood, Nash will eventually channel that energy elsewhere. But in the meantime, Nash pledged that he remains “happy to” mentor Clarkson more. “He’s a great kid and great people,” Nash said of Clarkson. “It’s been fun for me.” Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error So about a month after officially announcing his intention to retire, Nash has dabbled in various things to keep himself busy. His visit to Oak Street Elementary through the Grades of Green program represented a first-time appearance forh Nash, who hopes to make them more frequently considering his past experience supporting various environmental initiatives in Dallas and Phoenix. As the general manager of the Canadian men’s basketball team, Nash recently traveled to Toronto to host clinics. He often hangs out at his Manhattan Beach residence with his three children.Still, Nash plans to take an unspecified amount of time waiting, relaxing and reflecting on what his post-retirement career will entail. “I am just trying to take my time, get some space and perspective before I rush into too many things,” Nash said. “I have a tendency to rush into things because I can’t sit still. Then I always end up regretting it.”Nash maintains he has no regrets about how he handled the aftermath surrounding his season-ending injury where he stayed distant from the team in the final year of his contract worth $9.8 million. center_img His smile and his eyes widened as Steve Nash entered Oak Street Elementary School in Inglewood this week to honor students’ efforts to reduce waste. The images seemed familiar, Nash’s personality partly explaining how he gathered two NBA MVP awards and climbed to third place on the league’s all-time assists mark. Nash empowered those around him with his selflessness and positive energy. But Nash’s pleasant vibe also juxtaposed his feelings about the past year, his 2014-15 season with the Lakers ending before it started because of persistent back issues that soiled his three years here. Nash called it “a really dark period for me,” knowing his combined 65 appearances in two seasons with the Lakers soured an otherwise storied 19-year NBA career that will earn him an eventual Hall of Fame induction. “I don’t know if I’ll be past it for some time,” Nash said in an interview with Los Angeles News Group. “But you realize you have to move forward.”last_img read more

Science Writer Advocates Debate with Creationists

first_img(Visited 11 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 The Darwinist monopoly on science has backfired, suggested Michael Balter in the Los Angeles Times in a Sunday commentary.  A human evolution writer for Science magazine (e.g., 09/09/2005, 03/04/2005, 11/12/2004, 02/27/2004, 02/15/2002), Balter advocated engagement with the opposition.  “A national debate over how best to explain the complexity of living organisms would better serve our children, and adults too.”    Balter is confident that “science” (evolution) would win such a contest, but cited several reasons why a national debate is necessary.  “Most scientists don’t want any debate,” he wrote.  To them, evolution has already won, and deserves a monopoly in science classrooms.  The success of the Discovery Institute in finding hundreds of scientists unconvinced of Darwinian evolution, added to the consistent findings of polls that the majority of Americans do not accept evolution, Balter argues, “suggests that scientists have won few converts during at least the last two decades – despite a 1987 U.S. Supreme Court decision banning the teaching of creationism in the classroom.”    The failure of evolutionists to win “converts” is only partly a reflection of the continuing influence of religion, he said.  “Yet it also implies that scientists have not been persuasive enough, even when buttressed by strong scientific evidence that natural selection alone can account for life’s complexity.”  Part of their lack of persuasiveness has been their very reluctance to engage their opponents.  It’s time for a change, Balter argues:Pro-evolution scientists have little to lose and everything to gain from a nationwide debate.  Let’s put the leading proponents of intelligent design and our sharpest evolutionary biologists on a national television panel and let them take their best shots.  If biblical literalists want to join in, let them.  Let’s encourage teachers to stage debates in their classrooms or in assemblies.  Students can be assigned to one or the other side, and guest speakers can be invited.  Among other things, students would learn that science, when properly done, reaches conclusions via experimentation, evidence and argument, not through majority view. (Emphasis added in all quotes.)To those who worry about injecting religion in science class, Balter said it’s too late.  “Religious faith and thinking are already in the classroom, as the opinion polls strongly suggest,” he wrote.  “And the courts should stay out of it because educators would not be required nor allowed to advocate a religious point of view.”    Balter spoke of a long history of “bitter debates between religion and science,” and claimed that after Darwin seemed to have refuted the arguments of William Paley, “Darwin’s theories were rigorously tested and criticized before they won over the majority of scientists.”    For these reasons, today’s evolutionists should not break tradition, but engage the critics.  “The best way to teach the theory of evolution is to teach this contentious history.  The most effective way to convince students that the theory is correct is to confront, not avoid, continuing challenges to it.”    Balter’s surprising declaration of support for “teaching the controversy,” a policy the intelligent design movement has long advocated, goes against the grain of positions taken by scientific institutions like Nature (see 04/27/2004).  He argues, though, that evolutionists should engage the debate with gusto: “Bring it on.”Anyone watching the controversy over evolution should see this as a major shift in strategy by someone pretty high up in the Science establishment.  It’s good that Balter wants this to be a debate in the open marketplace of ideas rather than the courts, and if the Darwinists are really willing to put their best arguments toe-to-toe with those of intelligent design, that would be a refreshing change.    Watch out for stealth tactics, though.  Incumbent presidents, for instance, have been known to rig debate rules to give themselves the media advantage.  We don’t want to see twelve Nobel Laureates go against Kent Hovind on national TV with a Darwinist moderator, and subject the results to biased editing the way the last episode of PBS Evolution rigged the contest, and have the Darwin Party announce afterwards, “So there.  There was your debate, and you guys lost.”  But the fact that Balter encourages this kind of debate in school classrooms and assemblies should preclude that, if his advice takes hold.    His history is flawed; Darwinism did not take hold because it was rigorously tested.  It won a huge propaganda blitz intentionally conducted by Charlie’s Four Musketeers (01/06/2004), Asa Gray, Thomas Huxley, Charles Lyell and Joseph Hooker, with help from Darwinist radical Ernst Haeckel on the continent.  It won also because leading Darwinists obtained power over publishing and gained leadership of prestigious universities and museums, where they controlled the curriculum and content.  Darwin’s own theory of natural selection went through a long period of eclipse after his book, until it was resurrected as neo-Darwinism more by consensus than by rigorous testing.  Creationism and design science has always been a strong influence bucking this current of usurpation by the philosophical materialists.    Balter is confident that “students would learn that science, when properly done, reaches conclusions via experimentation, evidence and argument, not through majority view.”  That would be a great lesson.  Currently, students are learning that “evolution is a fact because all scientists agree it is a fact.”  Balter believes that engagement will remove the claim that Darwinian theory is shielded from “challenges that, when properly refuted, might win over adherents to evolutionary views.”  When the views are compared, however, each Darwin convert is likely to be outnumbered by converts to the other side, based on the history of creation-evolution debates.  And if the Darwinists are finally forced to “reach conclusions via experimentation, evidence and argument,” it will be their downfall.  Balter may have unintentionally heralded the end of the Darwin Party Storytelling Welfare State.  Bring it on.last_img read more