Open letter to new president about two imprisoned cyber-dissidents

first_img Receive email alerts Vietnam sentences journalist Tran Thi Tuyet Dieu to eight years in prison VietnamAsia – Pacific Help by sharing this information Three more independent reporters arrested in Vietnam News News RSF laureates support jailed Vietnamese journalist Pham Doan Trang April 7, 2021 Find out more News Follow the news on Vietnam to go furthercenter_img Reporters Without Borders wrote today to Nguyen Minh Triet, who has just taken over from Tran Duc Luong as Vietnam’s president, asking him to pardon Pham Hong Son (photo) and Nguyen Vu Binh, two cyber-dissidents who are serving prison sentences of five and seven years respectively. The letter drew attention to Pham Hong Son’s state of health, which is particularly worrying. News June 29, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Open letter to new president about two imprisoned cyber-dissidents April 27, 2021 Find out more April 22, 2021 Find out more Organisation ————-Create your blog with Reporters without borders: www.rsfblog.org VietnamAsia – Pacific Reporters Without Borders wrote today to Nguyen Minh Triet, who has just taken over from Tran Duc Luong as Vietnam’s president, asking him to pardon Pham Hong Son and Nguyen Vu Binh, two cyber-dissidents who are serving prison sentences of five and seven years respectively.The letter drew attention to Pham Hong Son’s state of health, which is particularly worrying. He has been held since 27 March 2002.”Dear Mr. President,Reporters Without Borders, an organisation that defends press freedom worldwide, would like to take the opportunity of your appointment as President of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam to ask you to pardon Pham Hong Son and Nguyen Vu Binh, two prisoners of conscience whose only crime was to express their opinions on the Internet.We are particularly concerned about the state of health of Pham Hong Son, who was arrested on 27 March 2002. A physician and marketing executive with a pharmaceutical company, he was sentenced on appeal on 26 August 2003 to five years in prison and three years of house arrest. He has an inguinal hernia that could prove fatal if it is not operated on. He has also had chest pains and has been spitting up blood – the symptoms of tuberculosis – since July 2005 but he is not receiving appropriate treatment.Arrested on 25 September 2002, Nguyen Vu Binh was sentenced on 31 December 2003 to seven years in prison and three years of house arrest. A former journalist with an official publication of the Communist Party of Vietnam, he was accused of having relations with “subversive dissidents” such as Pham Hong Son and of posting articles on the Internet which, according to the authorities of your country, were of a “reactionary nature.”We ask you to re-examine the cases of these two prisoners, whose detention has gone on for too long. We also invite you to comply with the undertakings your country gave in its “white paper on human rights” in 2005, especially as regards free expression and the unrestricted use of the Internet. Concrete progress in this area would undoubtedly be hailed by the entire international community at a time when Vietnam is preparing to join the World Trade Organisation.I trust you will give these requests your careful consideration.”Sincerely,Robert Ménard, Secretary-GeneralPham Hong Son is sponsored by SVM Mac (France), Liberation.fr (France), Nathalie Griesbeck (a French member of the European Parliament), the House of the Press in Mons (Belgium), the House of the Press in Charleroi (Belgium), TéléPro magazine (Belgium), Vlan-Liège (Belgium), El Siglo (Spain), Periodistas-es.org (Spain) and The Concordian (Canada). RSF_en last_img read more

Creepy Crawlers

first_imgThey have a thousand legs and are often considered to be among the most disliked insects. But millipedes and centipedes aren’t even insects. In fact, millipedes are more closely related to lobsters, crayfish and shrimp.I have recently received calls concerning “a small, worm-like insect.” These worm-like pests can be seen crawling around on carports, the sides of homes and around the edges of structures by the hundreds. You may also occasionally find them dead inside your home.   These callers are actually referring to millipedes or centipedes. Millipedes are often called “thousand-legged worms.” Their counterpart, the centipede, is often known as the “hundred-legged worm.” Neither the millipede nor the centipede carries diseases that affect people, animals or plants. They are most active at night, when the house centipede searches for cockroaches and other insects.Millipedes aren’t poisonous, but some species are capable of secreting chemicals that can irritate the skin and eyes and cause allergic reactions. It is not advisable to handle these pests with your bare hands. Some millipedes have a defensive spray that contains hydrochloric acid, which can burn the skin. Centipedes seldom bite, and their jaws contain poison glands.Millipede species vary in length from less than 1 inch to 2 or more inches and range in color from light brown to black. Depending on the species, centipedes vary in length from 1 to 12 or more inches, but the most common species found in Georgia is less than 5 inches long. Centipedes vary in color from light yellow to dark and reddish brown.Both the millipede and the centipede like similar cool, dark, moist environments, like under stones and logs, in the soil, wood piles, leaf litter and debris, and rotting materials.University of Georgia Cooperative Extension recommends control of these pests through habitat removal (wood piles, leaf litter and piles of trash). Moving mulch at least 3 feet away from the sides of buildings will reduce millipede breeding. Next, physically prevent them from entering your home. Make sure that doors and windows fit tightly and ensure there are no cracks or crevices available as entry points. Pesticides can also be applied. If you spray insecticides on wood piles, do not burn the wood for at least two weeks following application.For more information about millipedes or centipedes, see the UGA Extension publication “Millipedes and Centipedes” at www.extension.uga.edu/publications.last_img read more