Facebook rejects call to share revenue with Australian media

first_imgFacebook on Monday rejected calls from the Australian government and news companies that it share advertising revenue with the media, suggesting it would rather cut news content from its platform.The US tech giant said in a submission to Australia’s competition watchdog that news represents a “very small fraction” of the content in an average user’s news feed.”If there were no news content available on Facebook in Australia, we are confident the impact on Facebook’s community metrics and revenues in Australia would not be significant,” it said in a thinly veiled threat to boycott local news companies. “Given the social value and benefit to news publishers, we would strongly prefer to continue enabling news publishers’ content to be available on our platform,” it said.In an effort being closely watched around the world, Australia is set to unveil plans to force Facebook and Google to share advertising revenue they earn from news featured in their services.The initiative has been strongly pushed by Australia’s two biggest media companies, Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp and Nine Entertainment.They argue that the crisis roiling the news industry worldwide is mainly because of Google, Facebook and other large tech firms capturing the vast majority of online advertising revenues, without fairly compensating media companies for advertisements placed against news content. The loss of advertising dollars that previously flowed to newspapers has forced cutbacks and bankruptcies across the sector, a process exacerbated by the economic downturn caused by the coronavirus pandemic.In Australia, News Corp, Nine and other media have both announced major cuts in editorial staff, with more than 170 newsrooms and newspapers suspended or shuttered in recent years.Australia’s competition regulator, the ACCC, has estimated that Google and Facebook together earn some Aus$6 billion (US$4 billion) a year from advertising in the country.Leading news publishers have demanded the two companies pay at least 10 percent of that money each year to local news organizations.Google last month rejected the demand, saying it made barely Aus$10 million a year from news-linked advertising.The two companies’ positions bode ill for negotiations the ACCC hopes to pursue between the tech firms and Australian media companies over a mandatory “code of conduct” governing issues such as revenue sharing, curbing disinformation, data sharing and protecting user privacy.The ACCC has until the end of July to draw up the final code, which the government has said it will quickly implement.center_img Topics :last_img read more

Gov. Wolf: Pennsylvania Businesses Endorse Mask-Wearing to Protect Employees, Customers, Communities

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter June 25, 2020 Economy,  Press Release,  Public Health Multiple research studies indicate the efficacy of mask-wearing to protect against the spread of COVID-19. Mask-wearing also has been called altruistic, a way to increase our freedoms, and a simple kindness. Today, Governor Tom Wolf’s call to wear masks has been endorsed by Pennsylvania businesses that see mask-wearing as vital to protecting customers, employees, communities and their bottom lines.“The COVID-19 guidance we provided to Pennsylvania businesses includes required mask-wearing by all who enter a business – employees and customers – because we know owners want to do all they can to protect those who help them maintain their bottom line,” Gov. Wolf said. “I’m pleased that employers both large and small have taken this guidance seriously and are joining me in a call to protect against the spread of COVID-19.”“The GIANT Company continues to take the necessary steps to keep our customers and team members safe in the ongoing fight against the coronavirus – from requiring team members to wear masks to checkstand partitions at registers, plus other social distancing and strict sanitation protocols,” said president Nicholas Bertram. “Everyone should continue to do their part as good neighbors to follow the mask-wearing guidance put forth by Governor Wolf to protect each other and help stop the spread of the virus.”“Businesses should model the importance of safety and precaution through their practices — including masks — to build customer trust and ultimately keep everyone safe,” Mallory Fix Lopez, owner, On Point Bistro in South Philadelphia said. “This also leads to more sustainable business. Safe employees mean a secure workforce. Additionally, customers have faith they are safe when patronizing the business. The use of masks is key to public health and business sustainability, and it’s essential that businesses are actively supporting the use of masks.”“As a hair salon owner, the safety of my customers is important to me,” said Georgeanne Huff-Labovitz, owner of Marie Huff Hairdressing in Tacony in NE Philadelphia. “I am taking every effort to ensure their safety. Wearing a face covering protects everyone and prevents the spread of COVID-19 and is a key part of safely reopening my business and serving my customers.”Gov. Wolf and Sec. of Health Dr. Rachel Levine made mask-wearing a requirement of businesses with in-person operations via the secretary’s order that grants her this authority granted by law.The governor and secretary of Health’s business guidance centered around reopening includes the mask-wearing requirement. The guidance states that businesses must “Require all customers to wear masks while on the premises. Businesses that provide medication, medical supplies or groceries must provide an alternate, no contact, means of delivering goods for customers who cannot wear a mask. However, individuals who cannot wear a mask due to a medical condition (including children under the age of 2 years per CDC guidance) may enter the premises and are not required to provide documentation of such medical condition.”Read more on Gov. Wolf’s Process to Reopen PA here.Ver esta página en español.center_img Gov. Wolf: Pennsylvania Businesses Endorse Mask-Wearing to Protect Employees, Customers, Communitieslast_img read more

Why Marriage Matters

first_imgKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox. Boys raised in non-intact families are more likely to engage in delinquent and criminal behavior.Marriage appears to reduce the risk that adults will be either perpetrators or victims of crime.Married women appear to have a lower risk of experiencing domestic violence than do cohabiting or dating women.A child who is not living with his or her own two married parents is at greater risk of child abuse.There is a growing marriage gap between college-educated Americans and less educated Americans.https://www.acpeds.org/why-marriage-matters”>https://www.acpeds.org/why-marriage-matters American College of Pediatricians 5 September 2016Marriage is important for more reasons than you may think. “Why Marriage Matters” is a book that highlights 30 conclusions from social sciences that proclaim the importance of marriage. They have compiled the 30 reasons into 5 domains. Here is a list of the 30 findings.Family Marriage increases the likelihood that fathers and mothers have good relationships with their children.Children are most likely to enjoy family stability when they are born into a married family.Children are less likely to thrive in complex households.Cohabitation is not the functional equivalent of marriage.Growing up outside an intact marriage increases the likelihood that children will themselves divorce or become unwed parents.Marriage is a virtually universal human institution.Marriage, and a normative commitment to marriage, foster high-quality relationships between adults, as well as between parents and children.Marriage has important biosocial consequences for adults and children.EconomyDivorce and unmarried childbearing increase poverty for both children and mothers, and cohabitation is less likely to alleviate poverty than is marriage.Married couples seem to build more wealth on average than singles or cohabiting couples.Marriage reduces poverty and material hardship for disadvantaged women and their children.Minorities also benefit economically from marriage.Married men earn more money than do single men with similar education and job histories.Parental divorce (or failure to marry) appears to increase children’s risk of school failure.Parental divorce reduces the likelihood that children will graduate from college and achieve high-status jobs.Physical Health and LongevityChildren who live with their own two married parents enjoy better physical health, on average, than do children in other family forms.Parental marriage is associated with a sharply lower risk of infant mortality.Marriage is associated with reduced rates of alcohol and substance abuse for both adults and teens.Married people, especially married men, have longer life expectancies than do otherwise similar singles.Marriage is associated with better health and lower rates of injury, illness, and disability for both men and women.Marriage seems to be associated with better health among minorities and the poor.Mental Health and Emotional Well-beingChildren whose parents divorce have higher rates of psychological distress and mental illness.Cohabitation is associated with higher levels of psychological problems among children.Family breakdown appears to increase significantly the risk of suicide.Married mothers have lower rates of depression than do single or cohabiting mothers.Crime and Domestic Violencelast_img read more

It was all set up for the Syracuse men’s and women’s rowing teams. Before their races, the Orange honored 2008 Olympic Gold Medalist Anna Goodale, who graduated from SU in 2005, and dedicated a new shell to the 1978 IRA champions.

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on April 19, 2009 at 12:00 pm It was all set up for the Syracuse men’s and women’s rowing teams. Before their races, the Orange honored 2008 Olympic Gold Medalist Anna Goodale, who graduated from SU in 2005, and dedicated a new shell to the 1978 IRA champions.Only one problem: The men failed to win their races.The men’s team lost the Varsity Eight race Saturday to Cornell and failed to win the Goes Trophy. The Big Red finished with a time of 6:03.1, about four seconds better than Syracuse’s 6:07.0. Navy finished third with 6:14.1.It was the first time the men’s team lost a cup race since it was defeated by Dartmouth on May 8, 2005. The loss to Cornell snapped the Orange’s near-three-year undefeated streak in cup races.The young Varsity Eight boat of No. 10 Syracuse, which is comprised of five sophomores, two juniors and two seniors, was matched up with tough competition in No. 9 Cornell and No. 13 Navy.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text‘We do not see it is a thing of youth,’ sophomore Kenny Marfilius said. ‘When we are out on the water rowing, we never look at ourselves as being five sophomores, two juniors and two seniors. We prefer to look at ourselves as being one unit.‘I do not believe the inexperience had anything to do with (losing the race),’ he added. ‘The ability to go out and race during our cup season allows us to see what we need to work on and ultimately work towards. We still have the same goal of getting the top seed at the Eastern Sprints and the IRA.’Despite finishing second in the Varsity Eight race, the men still had a shot at the Stagg Trophy, which is awarded to the team that finishes the regatta with the most overall points. However, the Big Red was not to be denied and swept the awards in a showcase weekend for Syracuse rowing.The women did not fare much better than the men, finishing third out of three in their Varsity Eight race. They were defeated by No. 15 Harvard and No. 21 Dartmouth. The Orange posted a time of 7:09.5, while the Crimson won the race in 6:48.6. The Big Green finished second with a time of 6:55.4.The men’s team finished the regatta with one first-place finish, three second-place finishes, and one third-place finish, while the women completed the day with two first, second, and third-place finishes in their races.The No. 24 women, newcomers to the Top 25, kicked off their day by suffering a third-place setback. The Orange entered Saturday’s regatta confident and motivated after being named the Eastern Association of Women’s Rowing Colleges Coaches and Big East Crews of the Week for their performance last weekend. The SU Varsity Eght won the Orange Cup for the first time since 2005 following its three-second victory against Northeastern and Pennsylvania.The women’s freshman eight continued to perform well, defeating Dartmouth by 4.1 seconds. The Big Green edged the Crimson by less than one second to finish behind the Orange.With Saturday’s regatta in the books, the Orange will gear up for the Big East Championship in Camden, N.J., Sunday.As for the men’s squad, it does not race until Saturday, when it takes on Boston University and Columbia for the Conlan Cup – its final race before the Eastern Sprints on May 10. The Varsity Eight squad will do its best to wash out the sour taste of this weekend’s disappointing finish.‘I have no doubts about anyone on this team, I don’t care how long or how little they have been rowing for,’ senior Martin Etem said. ‘We back each other up out there, so there are no worries here. When the time comes, we will perform on race day no matter who we are racing, or where we are racing.’[email protected]center_img Commentslast_img read more