PEMCo performs “Into the Woods”

first_imgTags: cinderella, into the woods, little red riding hood, pasquerilla east music company, PEMCo, Washington Hall Pasquerilla East Music Company’s (PEMCo) production of “Into the Woods” will begin performances Thursday night on Washington Hall’s main stage.Actor Chris Siemann said the musical’s plot is a “mash-up” of fairy tales.“It’s Cinderella, Jack and the Beanstalk, Little Red Riding Hood and Rapunzel all thrown into the same story,” Siemann said.Auditions for the cast were held at the beginning of the semester and rehearsals began in September, for several nights a week, Siemann said.“On average, for each of us, it was maybe one to three hours a night,” he said. “Some nights I wasn’t even called, but other nights I was there for four hours.”Siemann said he plays the role of the wolf from Little Red Riding Hood, as well as Cinderella’s prince.“The parts were meant to be double cast, for symbolic reasons,” he said. “The wolf interacts with Little Red Riding Hood, and that story plays out the way you think it would. Then I have to kind of quick change into the Cinderella’s Prince — without spoiling too much, he’s exactly who you think he’s going to be. The characters are similar; they have a very similar mindset of instinct, and getting what [they] want.”“Into the Woods” is a unique show because it has a large cast but no chorus, Siemann said.“There are seventeen people and they’re all unique characters, and we all have our own moment, so to speak, on the stage,” Siemann said. “It’s really cool that we get to develop these characters. When you’re in a chorus, you can still develop your character, but you don’t have as much to work with. So it’s really cool that we’re all on even playing ground.”The production is entirely student-run, which creates a unique experience for all the members of PEMCo, he said.“Everyone understands everyone else’s commitments, we’re all doing school, we all have other things that we’re involved in,” he said. “It makes you feel really proud of something, that we’re working as one unit.”Producer and senior Emma Kusters said she began preparations for the production last semester, along with fellow producer and senior Shannon Kirk.“We started last spring, when we reviewed director applications and selected a director for the show, and we picked what show we were going to do,” Kusters said. “Over the summer we were e-mailing, designing set and costumes, and then we had auditions the second week of school.“A large part of my time this summer was revamping the PEMCo website,” Kusters said. “I’ve really been trying to make the information about PEMCo more accessible, so that we can reach students who aren’t already in the PEMCo fold, so we can be pulling in new talent, so that everyone feels welcome to participate and audition in whatever capacity they can.”Kusters said the producers considered several factors in choosing PEMCo’s fall show.“Part of the consideration is always budget,” Kusters said. “We took a pretty big risk this year because usually our fall show is a smaller-scale show. Last year there were only four actors in the show, and the year before that there were seven.“This year we have a seventeen-person cast, and we actually ended up spending even more money on this show than we did on ‘Legally Blonde’ last year, which was our big show last year,” she said.The producers also looked for a show that would appeal to the student body, Kusters said.“Into the Woods’ is all these fairy tales coming together in a sort of fantastical way, in a way that’s also very relevant to the human experience and everyone here,” she said.Kusters said the show has a variety of stunts and visual effects, as well as an elaborate set.“Everyone in the cast has to pitch in to make the set; it was a really a group effort,” she said. “I think this is the best set PEMCo has had in a while.”“Into the Woods” premieres Thursday, November 6th at 7:30 p.m., in Washington Hall. Performances also running November 7th at 7:30 p.m., and November 8th at 4:00 p.m. Tickets are $7 for students and $10 for non-students.last_img read more

Supreme Court sides with Hobby Lobby on HHS mandate in 5-4 decision

first_imgLifeSiteNews 20 June 2014This morning the U.S. Supreme Court decided closely held corporations with religious objections cannot be compelled to furnish potentially abortion-inducing drugs to their employees by a 5-4 decision.The Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993 (RFRA) allows for closely-held corporations like Hobby Lobby to maintain their religious outlook and still do business, the majority ruled in a 49-page opinion written by Justice Samuel Alito. The law holds that government may only impose a mandate that burdens religious business owners’ consciences if the government has a compelling interest in doing so and uses the least invasive means possible.“We must next ask whether the HHS contraceptive mandate ‘substantially burden[s]’ the exercise of religion,” the justices wrote. “We have little trouble concluding that it does.”“We reject HHS’s arguments that the owners of the companies forfeited all RFRA protection when they decided to organize their businesses as corporations rather than sole proprietorships or general partnerships,” they added. “The plain terms of RFRA make it perfectly clear that Congress did not discriminate in this way against men and women who wish to run their business as for-profit corporations in the manner required by their religious beliefs.”The ruling holds that the HHS mandate is not the least invasive alternative. “The mandate plainly fails that test,” the opinion holds.http://www.lifesitenews.com/news/breaking-supreme-court-sides-with-hobby-lobby-on-hhs-mandate-religious-freelast_img read more

Euro 2106 line-up complete

first_imgAfter Sweden and the Ukraine booked their places in France last night, the seedings have been finalised.The Ukraine claimed a 3-1 aggregate win over Slovenia to secure a place among the second seeds, while Sweden will be in Pot 3 after a 4-3 victory over both legs of their play-off tie against Denmark.Joining Ireland in Pot 4 will be Turkey, Iceland, Wales, Albania and Northern Ireland.last_img

LeBron James explains what he was doing during ridiculous travel that wasn’t called

first_imgLeBron James got away with one of the worst travels in NBA history, and he knows it.During the first quarter of the Lakers’ Wednesday night win against the Jazz, James was dribbling the ball up court before he started just walking with the ball in his hands. Jazz defender Bojan Bogdanovic was covering James on the play and couldn’t believe his eyes. He immediately looked directly at the referee wondering why there was no call. NBA POWER RANKINGS:Bucks, Lakers look like title contenders; Knicks, Warriors sink to bottomLMAO LeBron 😂 pic.twitter.com/62xwLe8aD0— House of Highlights (@HoHighlights) December 5, 2019James said he saw a replay at halftime after a coach showed him, and responded to a heckler joking, “That’s one of the worst [travels] I’ve ever done in my life.” LeBron talking to a fan about the no call travel??“That was f*cked up…” 😂😂 pic.twitter.com/mruuwsR4xu— Dime (@DimeUPROXX) December 5, 2019After the game, the Lakers star explained why he suddenly picked the ball up after crossing halfcourt.“I think at the same time, I was watching the underneath play, and [Kentavious Caldwell-Pope] and Donovan [Mitchell] got into it. KCP started to run, and Donovan bumped into him, he fell on the ground,” James said. “I think I was ready to pass the ball, and my brain just kind of just, I had a malfunction. I really had a malfunction.” James added, “It was the worst thing, probably one of the worst things I’ve ever done in my career.”He also said he feels bad for whoever missed the traveling call, because they’re going to hear about it.”I feel bad for the refs on that one because they’ll probably get a write-up on that or something,” James said. “That was pretty bad.”last_img read more

16th annual hoops for a cure

first_imgOne of the longest running rivalries will continue as the Chartiers Valley High School faculty and alumni will take to the hardwoods to take on the Pittsburgh Steelers in the 16th annual “Hoops For A Cure” doubleheader on April 15 at Chartiers Valley High School. With more than $1 million raised for pancreatic cancer research, the popular “HOOPS FOR A CURE” charity event will benefit the Nathan S. Arenson Fund for Pancreatic Cancer Research, which is overseen by Dr. Olivera Finn, professor and chair at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.The “HOOPS FOR A CURE” charity doubleheader will find the Steelers and the Chartiers Valley Faculty and Alumni tangling in the 8 p.m. finale. Prior to the main event, the evening will begin with the AAAA Section 4 All-Stars taking on the WPIAL All-Stars beginning at 6:30 p.m.The event has raised more than $1 million in the past 15 years for the Nathan S. Arenson Fund for Pancreatic Cancer Research at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute.Pancreatic cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Not only is this disease common, but it also is extremely difficult to diagnose and treat.(For more information or to purchase an admission or raffle ticket in advance of the event, contact Adrienne Arenson at (412) 279-1935. If you cannot attend the event but wish to make a charitable donation, please send a check payable to “UPCI/Arenson Fund” c/o Jeff Hilty, 633 Gregg St., Bridgeville, PA 15017.)last_img read more