OUSU campaign takes consent classes to France

first_imgIt Happens Here (IHH), Oxford University Student Union’s (OUSU) sexual harrasment campaign group, has recently taken their consent classes to France.Several members of the IHH committee ran the workshops with students aged 15-18 at the Anglophone Section of the Lycée François Premier in Fontainebleau, a commune close to Paris, from 24 to 27 November.The consent classes, which are similar to those IHH organise through JCRs for freshers’ week, mark the first international trip of the group’s latest initiative to offer adapted versions of consent workshops in schools outside Oxford.The workshops were some of the first of their kind to take place in France, where the idea of consent education is relatively unknown compared to the UK.Josh Rampton, the co-chair of IHH, which is “committed to raising awareness of sexual violence, supporting survivors, and promoting consent and first response education”, described the work as “a great success”.Rampton told Cherwell, “The committee members were pleasantly shocked by how quickly and fervently most of the students became engaged with the subject. The students, much like those in Freshers Week, were horrified but often not surprised by the statistics that were discussed. They were given French statistics illustrating the prevalence of sexual harassment, assault, and rape in these workshops.“Despite many comments to the effect of ‘but this is obvious…’, quite a few very basic misconceptions surrounding sexual assault were successfully dismantled. Many students were surprised to learn of the controversy these workshops provoked in the UK.”One sixth-former at the Lycée, Antoine Sacco, shared the optimism of IHI. He said, “It was definitely a good idea, and the fact that we had data for both France and the UK was very pleasant. Students liked it much [sic], even though it would have been great to have different activities. Reading comments about sexual harassment was quite boring from the fourth one.“I believe everybody enjoyed it and praise the initiative taken there.”On behalf of the University’s Faculty of Modern Languages, Simon Kemp, Associate Professor of French at Somerville, told Cherwell, “We’re very proud of our students’ determination to make a difference and delighted to have the university associated with such important work. I’m glad that the consent workshops in France were a success, and that French media interest means their efforts may have a broader impact.”For the first time this October, every Oxford JCR ran ‘compulsory’ consent classes.Similar workshops were met with backlash at some universities. Undergraduates at York University and Clare College in Cambridge boycotted the “patronising” consent classes.last_img read more

News story: Photocentric: company wins Queen’s Award for International Trade

first_imgAward-winning innovationThe Queen’s Awards for Enterprise recognise the contributions and outstanding achievement of UK businesses in innovation, international trade, sustainable development and promoting opportunity through social mobility.The founder of Photocentric, Paul Holt, said: A grant from Innovate UK in 2014 helped us to develop a prototype and employ a new chemist. A few months later – and much to my amazement – the chemist created a 3D printed rook. It was a very bad one, but it was the most significant object we will ever print. The impact on our business has been completely transformative. This year, we will invest over £1 million in R&D and we are working with some of the best universities and biggest companies in the world. Kalvis Gredzens and Richard Wenborn, 3D Development Engineers at Photocentric, developing the next generation of Liquid Crystal 3D Printers.A growth in sales and scientific staffHolt said: In March this year, Photocentric also received the Manufacturing Innovation Award at the Made in Central and East England Awards. Earlier, in February, the company was selected as a CommonwealthFirst Export Champion by the Commonwealth Enterprise and Investment Council.This isn’t the first time the company has won a Queen’s Award. In 2016 Photocentric received the award for Enterprise: Innovation.Photocentric leads development in 3D printingPhotocentric began in 2002 with the aim of making the creation of business stamps simpler and cheaper. Since then, the company has evolved into manufacturing 3D printers and patented photopolymer packs for making stamps. It is now the largest clear stamp manufacturer outside China.The 3D printers developed by Photocentric operate using patented technology to create a 3D object from a 2D image on a screen. They use the light emitted from an LCD screen that was originally intended for use in a mobile, tablet or TV to harden a special polymer made to react in daylight. The printers make both extremely high-resolution objects and very large format ones.Photocentric has been able to produce the printers at lower costs than alternative methods because the screens are made for mass-market applications. This has widened the scope of possible applications, including prototype building and small-scale manufacturing. Manufacturing and materials of the future is a core area in the government’s Industrial Strategy. Through the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund it is seeking new, affordable, light-weight composite materials.Find out more about the manufacturing and materials challenge. This is wonderful news for our business and we are very proud to be a winner of this prestigious award. We have always tried to innovate with new product ideas and being in a niche sector has meant that we have had to export to gain sales growth. This year we expect to sell over £2.3 million of 3D printers and photopolymers, rising to over £8 million by 2020 – all from an invention in 2014 which was a consequence of an Innovate UK grant. More than 74% of our sales are to overseas markets. Apply for innovation funding. The company’s strategy is based on product development and innovation, together with competitive pricing and excellent customer service.Over the last 5 years, sales have grown from £2.5 million to £5.7 million, with exports rising from £1.7 million to over £4 million. Their US subsidiary has further sales of over $3 million.Photocentric has also created 35 new jobs – almost doubling its workforce to 80. The company has a distribution network covering more than 50 countries worldwide. See how other companies have benefited from funding and support from Innovate UK.last_img read more

Creepy Crawlers

first_imgThey have a thousand legs and are often considered to be among the most disliked insects. But millipedes and centipedes aren’t even insects. In fact, millipedes are more closely related to lobsters, crayfish and shrimp.I have recently received calls concerning “a small, worm-like insect.” These worm-like pests can be seen crawling around on carports, the sides of homes and around the edges of structures by the hundreds. You may also occasionally find them dead inside your home.   These callers are actually referring to millipedes or centipedes. Millipedes are often called “thousand-legged worms.” Their counterpart, the centipede, is often known as the “hundred-legged worm.” Neither the millipede nor the centipede carries diseases that affect people, animals or plants. They are most active at night, when the house centipede searches for cockroaches and other insects.Millipedes aren’t poisonous, but some species are capable of secreting chemicals that can irritate the skin and eyes and cause allergic reactions. It is not advisable to handle these pests with your bare hands. Some millipedes have a defensive spray that contains hydrochloric acid, which can burn the skin. Centipedes seldom bite, and their jaws contain poison glands.Millipede species vary in length from less than 1 inch to 2 or more inches and range in color from light brown to black. Depending on the species, centipedes vary in length from 1 to 12 or more inches, but the most common species found in Georgia is less than 5 inches long. Centipedes vary in color from light yellow to dark and reddish brown.Both the millipede and the centipede like similar cool, dark, moist environments, like under stones and logs, in the soil, wood piles, leaf litter and debris, and rotting materials.University of Georgia Cooperative Extension recommends control of these pests through habitat removal (wood piles, leaf litter and piles of trash). Moving mulch at least 3 feet away from the sides of buildings will reduce millipede breeding. Next, physically prevent them from entering your home. Make sure that doors and windows fit tightly and ensure there are no cracks or crevices available as entry points. Pesticides can also be applied. If you spray insecticides on wood piles, do not burn the wood for at least two weeks following application.For more information about millipedes or centipedes, see the UGA Extension publication “Millipedes and Centipedes” at www.extension.uga.edu/publications.last_img read more

Security forces with Operation MARTILLO seize 14 tons of cocaine and capture 55 alleged drug traffickers

first_imgThe Boutwell’s crew will receive ribbons for their successful interdictions and stickers recognizing the cocaine seizures will be affixed to ship’s bridge wing, in keeping with Coast Guard tradition. By Dialogo October 14, 2014 The operations, conducted by U.S. Coast Guard and Navy patrols in cooperation with Latin American partner nations, seized the drugs and captured 55 suspects during 18 separate interdictions off the coasts of Central and South America. The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Boutwell brought the seized drugs to Naval Base San Diego, in the state of California, on October 6. U.S. authorities offloaded the drugs at the base. “You’ve made a tremendous difference in this work to combat the criminal networks that operate to transport illicit drugs and to bring great evil to this region and this hemisphere,” Vice Adm. Charles Ray, commander of the Coast Guard Pacific Area in Alameda, said during a ceremony aboard the Boutwell on October. 6. “Your work with these seizures made a big dent in their operations, and I couldn’t be prouder.” “Our crew used their unique capabilities and authorities as a military service, law enforcement agency, and member of the U.S. intelligence community to disrupt transnational organized crime networks in the Eastern Pacific and keep drugs from making it to the U.S.,” said Capt. Edward A. Westfall, the Boutwell’s commanding officer. “These illegal drug networks are dangerous breeding grounds for all types of trafficking and their immense profits fuel violence and instability.” The Boutwell’s crew will receive ribbons for their successful interdictions and stickers recognizing the cocaine seizures will be affixed to ship’s bridge wing, in keeping with Coast Guard tradition. “Our crew used their unique capabilities and authorities as a military service, law enforcement agency, and member of the U.S. intelligence community to disrupt transnational organized crime networks in the Eastern Pacific and keep drugs from making it to the U.S.,” said Capt. Edward A. Westfall, the Boutwell’s commanding officer. “These illegal drug networks are dangerous breeding grounds for all types of trafficking and their immense profits fuel violence and instability.” The Boutwell made six interdictions, seizing more than 2,267 kilograms of cocaine worth more than $75 million (USD), and its crew captured 19 alleged drug smugglers. The Coast Guard Cutter Bertholf, the USS McClusky, the USS Vandergrift, the USS Ingraham, the Coast Guard Tactical Law Enforcement Team South from Miami, Fla., and Coast Guard Helicopter Interdiction Tactical Squadron from Jacksonville, Fla., also made seizures and detained 36 additional alleged smugglers in the Eastern Pacific. “You’ve made a tremendous difference in this work to combat the criminal networks that operate to transport illicit drugs and to bring great evil to this region and this hemisphere,” Vice Adm. Charles Ray, commander of the Coast Guard Pacific Area in Alameda, said during a ceremony aboard the Boutwell on October. 6. “Your work with these seizures made a big dent in their operations, and I couldn’t be prouder.” Security forces working as part of Operation MARTILLO have between July and October seized about 14 tons of cocaine, worth an estimated $423 million (USD). The Boutwell made six interdictions, seizing more than 2,267 kilograms of cocaine worth more than $75 million (USD), and its crew captured 19 alleged drug smugglers. The Coast Guard Cutter Bertholf, the USS McClusky, the USS Vandergrift, the USS Ingraham, the Coast Guard Tactical Law Enforcement Team South from Miami, Fla., and Coast Guard Helicopter Interdiction Tactical Squadron from Jacksonville, Fla., also made seizures and detained 36 additional alleged smugglers in the Eastern Pacific. “The success of the crew of Cutter Boutwell, and of all our U.S. forces deployed throughout the Eastern Pacific Ocean, showcase the resolve of the Coast Guard, our interagency partners, and the international community to combat transnational organized crime networks operating in the Western Hemisphere. These Coast Guard men and women successfully confronted the risks brought on by the rising threat of transnational organized crime networks, which must be confronted to ensure maritime safety, efficiency, and security in the Western Hemisphere.” In 2013, security forces with Operation MARTILLO seized 131metric tons of cocaine, more than 32,000 pounds of marijuana, and 4,000 grams of heroin. Security forces with Operation MARTILLO also captured 295 suspects. The countries participating in Operation MARTILLO include Belize, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Guatemala, Honduras, the Netherlands, Nicaragua, Panamá, Spain, Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States. The countries participating in Operation MARTILLO include Belize, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Guatemala, Honduras, the Netherlands, Nicaragua, Panamá, Spain, Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States. Security forces working as part of Operation MARTILLO have between July and October seized about 14 tons of cocaine, worth an estimated $423 million (USD). The operations, conducted by U.S. Coast Guard and Navy patrols in cooperation with Latin American partner nations, seized the drugs and captured 55 suspects during 18 separate interdictions off the coasts of Central and South America. The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Boutwell brought the seized drugs to Naval Base San Diego, in the state of California, on October 6. U.S. authorities offloaded the drugs at the base. “The success of the crew of Cutter Boutwell, and of all our U.S. forces deployed throughout the Eastern Pacific Ocean, showcase the resolve of the Coast Guard, our interagency partners, and the international community to combat transnational organized crime networks operating in the Western Hemisphere. These Coast Guard men and women successfully confronted the risks brought on by the rising threat of transnational organized crime networks, which must be confronted to ensure maritime safety, efficiency, and security in the Western Hemisphere.” In 2013, security forces with Operation MARTILLO seized 131metric tons of cocaine, more than 32,000 pounds of marijuana, and 4,000 grams of heroin. Security forces with Operation MARTILLO also captured 295 suspects.last_img read more

Ireland’s NPRF to ‘look at’ possible legal action against State Street

first_imgCorrigan, whose NTMA oversees the reserve fund, also confirmed that the NPRF was referred to as client A in a recent report by the UK’s Financial Conduct Authority, published alongside the regulator’s decision to fine the transition management business £23m (€28m) for its failings.Following the announcement of the fine, the Commission announced that State Street Global Advisors (SSgA) had also been dropped as manager of equity mandates worth a total of €700m.In the FCA’s report, the regulator detailed how staff within State Street’s transition management business discussed how best to “get more revenue” from a deal tendered by the NPRF – which saw the fund liquidate close to €5bn of its portfolio due to the need to contribute toward’s Ireland’s €85bn bailout.One suggestion was to levy a 1-basis-point management fee “or something to that nature”, excluding any further commission, but to then take a spread of the deal.“We need to charge a fee, then – otherwise, they get suspicious,” the FCA report further quoted internal exchanges.Other exchanges discussed the possibility of raising further income after the fixed management fee levied on the third tranche of the transition was lowered from 1.65 basis points to 1.25bps.One employee said there was a “need to be very creative” in generating other sources of revenue.The unnamed employee then went on to outline what he believed should be done with “our new best friends”, adding the charge should be 1.65bps “for the privilege of working with us”.The employee later concluded: “We HAVE (sic) to show revenue in our numbers.”Corrigan said during the committee hearing that the overcharging had turned out to be “rogue behaviour”.When the FCA fine was announced, State Street noted it had self-reported the incident to the regulator and “dismissed individuals centrally involved in the overcharging” in 2011.“Also in 2011, we notified all transition management clients about the overcharging, only six of whom were directly affected,” the statement added.State Street declined to comment on the potential for legal action, instead referring IPE to a previous statement issued in the wake of the NPRF’s termination of the mandates overseen by SSgA. The National Pensions Reserve Fund (NPRF) has not ruled out legal action against State Street following an investigation that found the asset manager’s UK transition management service had “deliberately” overcharged the fund and five other clients.Paul Carty, chairman of the NPRF Commission, told a parliamentary committee that it was still considering “what detriment was suffered and if there is any further action that has to be considered”.However, speaking during the same Oireachtas committee of public accounts, National Treasury Management Agency (NTMA) chief executive John Corrigan confirmed that, while the Commission would “look at” legal action, he was uncertain if the route would be pursued.“The legal advice we are getting is that it could be problematic,” he said. “Perhaps I should say no more, lest I prejudice a case if it is decided to take one.”last_img read more