Study to Resolve Potential Conflicts between MCAS Cherry Point Neighbors

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR A joint land use study (JLUS) under way for Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point on the coast of North Carolina will address a number of potential conflicts between the base’s mission and neighboring land uses, including the construction of tall structures such as windmills, the density of development surrounding the airfield, noise impacts from the new F-35 Joint Strike Fighter and the use of surrounding waterways by boaters and commercial fishermen.“The JLUS process is fostering a good working relationship among the military installations and all neighboring communities to act as a team to prevent or curtail encroachment issues associated with the military mission,” Steve Player, project development manager for the Wooten Company, which is preparing the study, told the New Bern Sun Journal.The study is expected to recommend a uniform standard among surrounding counties governing tall structures that could present a danger to flight activities, as Craven, Pamlico and Carteret counties have differing rules.“We think that is probably a good step in the right direction as the Department of Defense looks at potential missions for Cherry Point down the road,” Player said.The study also will consider measures to limit development in accident potential zones near the installation’s runways, including recommendations discouraging mobile homes from being located there.“High density development is not a compatible use in association with the runways, the clearways and the accident potential zones that are immediately adjacent to the airfields, so we are looking at recommendations to reduce the density so that if an accident does occur, it would be less impactful,” said Player.The review will try to resolve conflicts between the installation’s bombing ranges and boaters in the Neuse River and Pamlico Sound, according to the story.“We are looking at suggestions and recommendations that would increase communication and decrease the conflict between the commercial and recreational fishermen and the mission that the Marine Corps has for those two air-to-ground bombing ranges,” Player said.The study also will address concerns about local infrastructure, such as the ability of area roads to handle increased military activity. Overall, the review is intended to preserve the ability of the installation to fulfill its military missions without affecting the quality of life for its neighboring communities.“We’ve been told that Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point has become a very desirable assignment for the Marines because of the quality of life in the surrounding communities,” Player said. “We want to continue to enhance those activities that make this a very attractive place for the Marines to come,” he said.last_img read more

Seabirds morphing wings inspire design for robots that can both fly and

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Seabird’s morphing wings inspire design for robots that can both fly and swim (2010, November 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-11-seabird-morphing-wings-robots.html (PhysOrg.com) — There are robots that can fly, and there are robots that can swim, but so far a robot that can both fly and swim does not exist. With the goal to design an aerial/aquatic robotic vehicle, a team of researchers is investigating how nature achieves both aerial and aquatic motion in a single entity, particularly in a seabird called the common guillemot. They plan to use their calculations, models, and simulations to design a robotic vehicle with a morphing wing similar to the one used by the seabird. Copyright 2010 PhysOrg.com.All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Explore further A robotic vehicle with the ability to fly and swim could have a variety of applications. For example, the vehicle could be used to inspect underwater oil pipes while flying to and from remote oil rigs. It could also be used for aerial and aquatic surveillance for counter-terrorism purposes. Variations in the missions could require very different operating speeds in each medium. The numerical model developed by the researchers takes these issues into consideration and can provide mission-specific optimal values to use in future concept vehicle designs. Currently, the researchers are developing an experimental platform from which they can investigate various parameters associated with flapping propulsion during aquatic locomotion.As Lock noted, there are still several challenges that need to be addressed, starting with the need to better understand the performance compromise between operations in the air and water due to the fact that robots of this type have not yet reached a level of maturity within the research community. “The second biggest challenge that we face is one that everybody within the robotics community has to deal with, and that is the problem of a suitable power source,” he said. “There is of course a finite payload which any robotic vehicle can carry, of which the power source invariably contributes a significant proportion of the overall mass. Implementing a power source that is light enough to allow aerial operations but provides sufficient power to enable the use of the locomotion mechanisms for any feasible length of time is a huge problem that we face. Luckily this is a common problem faced by many robots whereby the ultimate aim is for the untethered operations and as such many research groups are striving towards new power sources with greater power-to-weight ratios and lifespans. Although not currently available, we believe that in time a suitable power source will be developed that allows aerial/aquatic vehicles to be developed.“Finally, the third challenge we face comes from developing a vehicle of this scale capable of aerial operations utilizing beating wing flight. Very few mature examples exist that achieve this mode of locomotion through a flapping locomotion strategy, and they are not attempting operations in water as well. Solutions to this problem do exist, such as the inclusion of an additional propulsion source for use whilst in air such as a propeller, but this then moves away from the biological example from which the work drew inspiration. However, we are not ruling this out as a stepping stone whilst addressing other elements of the complex task that we face.”last_img read more