DBA Role Elevates in the Cloud, New EMC Solutions There To Help

first_imgOracle Open World is an important time of year for Oracle customers to learn about everything Oracle. This year’s buzz is heavily focused on cloud computing. What is often overlooked is not all the cool tech, but how it will impact IT peoples’ day-jobs. DBAs are the nucleus around which all processes flow. As Oracle customers move to cloud computing, the DBAs’ role may change, but it won’t diminish. In fact, a recent IOUG survey of over 30,000 DBAs outlined their top weekly tasks including tuning performance, creating and maintaining copies of data, and managing uptime and availability.EMC invests heavily in providing Oracle DBAs tested solutions that filter out the fluff, document real-world results and provide technical guidance to help DBAs achieve outstanding results. Four new solutions have been published by EMC for Oracle DBAs.They include:Mixed Workloads With No Planning or Tuning – Historically, DBAs have frowned upon mixing non-production and production workloads on the same storage system. But with EMC XtremIO all-flash arrays (AFAs), it can now be done while maintaining SLAs and application performance. How is this possible? XtremIO’s unique architecture offers consistent and predictable performance at scale, including in-memory metadata and application copy services. These application copy services catalyze transformational levels of efficiency for DBAs, including:Providing development and QA teams with instant database copies with no space or SLA impact.Accelerating analytics workflows by delivering real-time and on-demand decision support extractions.Consolidating databases and scaling workload performance while — at less than half the cost of the current infrastructure.Database as a Service Without Production Impact – This new EMC solution shows DBAs how to use EMC AppSync to take control of database copy operations, including creating and restoring patch environments, creating test and development environments and using Oracle Snapshot Optimization to protect and restore production with or without Oracle hot backup mode. Creating copies is nearly instantaneous, so the timeframes shown are the actual times to click through the AppSync wizard to fully complete each process.Up to 20x Faster Oracle Backup and Complete DBA Control – Traditional backup solutions struggle to meet stringent SLAs for Oracle databases – especially the performance and efficiency required for databases stored on an all-flash array. In addition, many DBAs want full control of the RMAN backup process without involving the backup team. EMC Data Domain can offer the combination of performance, efficiency and control. Today, EMC announced ProtectPoint for XtremIO, which offers 20x faster backup and eliminates backup impact on Oracle servers – by empowering DBAs to backup directly from XtremIO to Data Domain via RMAN. For those organizations not ready for ProtectPoint, the EMC Solution here shows DBAs the steps to take full control of offloaded or online backups using DD Boost for Oracle RMAN. This includes showing how a 20 TB database can be backed up at 36 TB/hr. and also backed up while production runs online.The Next Evolution For DBAs: Self-Service Hybrid Cloud ComputingEMC solutions empower DBAs to handle their primary day jobs faster and easier, including cloud infrastructure management.This new EMC solution outlines step-by-step how DBAs can leverage EMC Hybrid Cloud to take control of database provisioning operations in a virtualized environment, including adding vCPU, memory and storage once provisioned. More EMC Hybrid Cloud Solutions for Oracle databases will be released soon!All of these solutions and others can be found on the DBA Society, where DBAs can engage other DBAs and EMC’s own database and analytics experts – we encourage all DBAs to join and become an agent of efficiency!last_img read more

Murtagh earns Ireland thrilling win

first_img Murtagh’s efforts carried Ireland home by just one wicket, with a solitary ball to spare, in the ICC World Cricket League clash at Stormont after the Scots had looked set to snatch a vital victory. Ireland’s last pair needed nine from the last three balls when Murtagh suddenly changed the game by hitting Rob Taylor for a maximum down the ground and following up with another boundary. Ireland captain William Porterfield, who scored a century against England, carried on where he left off in Malahide by rattling up 62 from 64 balls with 10 fours. But he fell soon after the dismissal of his opening partner Paul Stirling (30) and Ireland struggled to recover the momentum. Former captain Trent Johnston did weigh in with 24 from 34 balls but it was not until Sorensen got to work, putting on 29 for the ninth wicket with Murtagh, that hopes were truly revived. It seemed over when Sorensen swung and missed after coming down the pitch to Machan, but Murtagh held his nerve. Scotland had sensed victory when the dangerous Max Sorensen had been stumped off the bowling of Matt Machan in the penultimate over after a match-changing 31. Prior to that Ireland had slumped from 95 without loss to 180 for eight in pursuit of 224, Majid Haq taking three for 26. The defeat means Scotland, who play Ireland again in their final game on Saturday, can no longer climb into the eight-team competition’s second qualification spot. They will have one last chance in a qualification tournament next year. Ireland, the leaders of the WCL, have already booked their place at the 2015 World Cup in Australia and New Zealand. Scotland posted 223 for nine from their 50 overs thanks largely to an unbeaten 91 from their South African-born captain Preston Mommsen. Although wickets fell at regular intervals, Mommsen shared in important partnerships of 60 for the fourth wicket with Calum MacLeod (21) and 44 for the ninth with Safyaan Sharif (26). Mommsen hit 10 fours in his 122-ball knock, holding the innings together after Machan’s promising start was ended on 27 by Sorensen. Somerset spinner George Dockrell, who struggled in the one-day clash with England earlier this week, was the pick of the Irish bowling with four for 24 from his 10 overs while Sorensen took two for 37. Press Association Tim Murtagh smashed a six and a four in the final over as Ireland ended Scotland’s hopes of automatic World Cup qualification with a dramatic win in Belfast.last_img read more

Taking the torch: Coffey appears ready to take reins of Syracuse offense in sophomore season

first_img Comments Erica Morrow knew exactly how Rachel Coffey felt last year. Three years earlier, Morrow was a highly touted freshman struggling to adjust on the court at Syracuse. After dominating in high school, Morrow received a rude awakening at practices in which mistakes piled up, the coaches criticized every little thing and the physical play wore her down. Morrow’s confidence was broken, and it took time to build back up. Three years later, the senior guard watched Coffey wrestle with the same challenges in her freshman season. ‘The point guard position is probably the toughest position to play on the collegiate level, especially transitioning from high school to college,’ said Morrow, now an SU graduate assistant. ‘So she had the typical bumps in the road that any freshman has — having to play intense at every moment, having to play at a faster, more physical speed.’ Coffey arrived at Syracuse as a top recruit — ranked No. 19 overall in her class by Blue Star Basketball — known for her uncanny ball handling and passing ability in high school. But she only saw limited action last season as she settled into her role waiting behind four-year starters Morrow and Tasha Harris in the SU backcourt. Following the graduations of Morrow and Harris, Coffey will likely take over as Syracuse’s starting point guard in 2011-12. With the growing pains of her freshman campaign behind her, Coffey is confident in her ability to lead the Orange.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text The sophomore has been preparing for this role since she first started dribbling at 5 years old. Coffey wasn’t interested in playing with toys as a kid. She just played basketball, emulating ‘Pistol’ Pete Maravich and eventually learning to dribble two balls at once and spin the ball on her finger as he did. And like Maravich, she dribbled everywhere — around the house, to the store and to church, where Coffey even left during the service to work on her ball handling outside. ‘I didn’t really practice at it,’ Coffey said. ‘I just always had a ball and kept dribbling and it became good.’ Another place she dribbled to was the Rondout Neighborhood Center in Kingston, N.Y., where she played every day for four hours after school. On snow days, she was there from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Rob Dassie, the recreation leader of the center, always saw Coffey with a ball. When she wasn’t at the center, Dassie said, she was on the playground. Whether she was playing at the center or at the playground, Coffey was taking on older boys. They didn’t give her any breaks. She needed to get better and develop mental toughness if she wanted to survive. Coffey did more than just survive, she took it to them. ‘That’s what I really believe helped her out so well that she played so hard and she did so well against those guys,’ Dassie said. ‘A lot of times, they were nervous about guarding her because at the end of the game they’d sometimes be arguing, ‘She’s a girl. She’s too good. She did us wrong. She took us off the dribble.” Those countless hours spent at the center and on the playground honed her game and laid the foundation for a stellar high school career. Stephen Garner first saw the phenom play in fourth grade at a ‘Sports Saturday’ program held for elementary school students at Kingston High School. She fired one-handed, no-look passes that surprised her teammates and displayed an array of advanced dribbling moves. Impressed by her moxie, Garner kept an eye on Coffey. Garner, Kingston’s girls basketball head coach, made Coffey his manager in sixth grade. A year later, she starred on the JV team, and by eighth grade, she was ready to play varsity. It was the start of a five-year show at Kingston’s Kate Walton Field House. Word quickly spread about Coffey. Soon, the girls team was a bigger draw than the boys. The community flocked to the field house to see the basketball prodigy play. Her no-look passes dazzled the crowd and stunned her teammates. Her killer crossover made opponents fall to the floor and ignited a roar from the fans. ‘Every game, it was almost like you were always wondering what she was gonna do next,’ said Louise DiIulio, her teammate at Kingston. ‘She always put on a show.’ DiIulio said Coffey’s court vision was ‘unreal.’ She could see her teammates were open before they even knew it, and she hit them with perfectly placed passes. Those unbelievable passes happened in every game. Garner always knew when one was coming: on a pick-and-roll with teammate Charlise Castro. Coffey started with a head fake and hesitation dribble to freeze her defender for the screen before exploding around the corner. As the defense frantically collapsed on her, she snapped off a shovel pass to a wide-open Castro under the basket for the layup. Sitting on the bench, Garner hardly ever saw how Coffey managed to thread the needle. At home after every game, he’d pop in the tape of the game and watch the play again, rewinding it over and over in disbelief of the pass he had seen hours earlier. ‘I would rewind that sucker three, four times and go, ‘How did she get it in there?” Garner said. ‘I mean, traffic, traffic, traffic. ‘How did she get it in there?” Rewinding it wasn’t enough to satisfy the coach, though. He’d freeze frame the play and go through it one frame at a time just to see exactly what Coffey saw. But Garner and DiIulio still don’t know how she did it. ‘I saw her do things that I’ve never seen any other female basketball player do to this day,’ DiIulio said. By the time the curtain closed on her career at Kingston, Coffey led the team to five sectional championships and set school records with 1,507 points and 569 assists. Her spectacular play grabbed the attention of multiple top programs, and she ultimately decided to play for Syracuse. SU head coach Quentin Hillsman recruited Coffey to be the point guard-in-waiting as a freshman. He knew he needed a replacement for Morrow and Harris, and Coffey was the total package. For the first time in a long time, Coffey wasn’t the best player on the team. Her confidence disappeared as she sat and watched from the bench. But she pushed the senior guards at practice and never complained. By the end of the season, Morrow saw a different player step in for her at practice as she nursed a knee injury. One filled with the confidence and mental toughness developed at the center and on the playground. The freshman needed that year to learn how to play at the college level. With that experience under her belt, Hillsman said she needed to improve her conditioning for this season, especially because he expects her to handle the ball for 25 to 30 minutes per game. ‘She’s one of the top point guards in the country,’ Hillsman said. ‘And I just believe that once she gets her conditioning together, where we keep the ball in her hand, and she can play for longer stretches, we’ll be a very good basketball team.’ Six days a week during the offseason, she was at the Carmelo K. Anthony Basketball Center preparing for her increased role. She ran on the treadmill, lifted weights and then ran some more. Now, Coffey feels she’s ready for the challenge. After spending the last 16 years with a ball in her hand, it’s time for her to run the show at Syracuse. ‘I feel comfortable with the ball in my hands,’ Coffey said. ‘I just gotta make sure I make good decisions and don’t turn the ball over.’ [email protected] Published on November 9, 2011 at 12:00 pm Contact Ryne: [email protected]center_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more