John Mayer Announces Extensive 2019 Summer Arena Tour

first_imgToday, John Mayer has announced the dates for a lengthy 2019 summer tour. Following his previously announced international spring solo tour and his summer commitments with Dead & Company, Mayer will hit the road for a string of North American solo arena dates.Mayer’s summer 2019 solo stretch will begin on July 19th with a performance at Albany, NY’s Times Union Center, followed by a July 20th show at Dunkin Donuts Center in Providence, RI. From there, John Mayer will play Philadelphia, PA’s Wells Fargo Center (7/22); Washington, D.C.’s Capitol One Arena (7/23); two nights at New York City’s Madison Square Garden (7/25, 7/26); Pittsburgh, PA’s PPG Paints Arena; Toronto, ON’s Scotiabank Arena (7/30); Detroit, MI’s Little Caesars Arena (8/2); Columbus, OH’s Schottenstein Center (8/3); St. Paul, MN’s Xcel Energy Center (8/5); Milwaukee, WI’s Fiserv Forum (8/6); Nashville, TN’s Bridgestone Arena (8/8); Charlotte, NC’s Spectrum Center (8/9); Atlanta, GA’s State Farm Arena (8/11); Indianapolis, IN’s Bankers Life Fieldhouse (8/12); and Chicago, IL’s United Center (8/14).From there, after a two-week break, John Mayer will perform at the Jas Labor Day Experience in Snowmass Village, CO before continuing into September with dates at Kansas City, MO’s Sprint Center (9/2); St. Louis, MO’s Enterprise Center (9/3); Dallas, TX’s American Airlines Center (9/5); San Antonio, TX’s AT&T Center (9/7); Houston, TX’s Toyota Center (9/8); Phoenix, AZ’s Talking Stick Resort Arena (9/10); and San Diego, CA’s Viejas Arena (9/11). Finally, Mayer will close out his tour with a pair of performances at The Forum in Los Angeles, CA on September 13th and 14th.Tickets for all of the newly announced shows go on sale this coming Friday, February 1st, and noon local time. An American Express and Fan Presale will take place tomorrow, Tuesday, January 29th at 10 a.m. local time. For a full list of John Mayer’s various upcoming tour dates, or for more information on ticketing, head to Mayer’s website here.last_img read more

Beauty and the Box: How One Company Found a Perfect Fit with PowerEdge MX Modular Platform

first_img Video Player is loading.Play VideoPauseMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 2:13Loaded: 7.42%0:00Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -2:13 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.This is a modal window.RestartShare I recently spent a day at the Great Little Box Company (GLBC) company headquarters in Vancouver, Canada for an illuminating, first-hand look into how the Dell EMC PowerEdge MX can have a profound effect on a medium-sized business. This award-winning, family-owned and operated company provides customers with a single source for all packaging and shipping supplies—from corrugated boxes to folding cartons and protective packaging. GLBC customers range from consumer goods producers to aerospace manufacturers.The company is growing rapidly and needed a better way to respond to customer demands, create innovative designs, improve production efficiency, and precisely manage inventory and deliveries. To meet these needs, GLBC turned to their long-time partner, Dell EMC. The Dell EMC team spent time with the company leaders to better understand the group’s unique challenges and requirements and develop a solution to meet their needs now and into the future. The teams realized that in order to support the company’s growth requirements, GLBC needed major performance enhancements to the existing multi-vendor IT infrastructure.The manufacturer looked at various options including HPE and IBM before choosing the PowerEdge MX platform. This integrated, modular solution enabled GLBC to upgrade not only its computing, but also other critical data center assets including storage and networking resources in the same chassis.“Dell EMC PowerEdge MX was the best fit for us,” said IT Manager, Sorel Apreutesei. “PowerEdge MX has delivered performance increases of up to 100 percent—for both our ERP implementation and other key applications. We rely on it day to day to streamline our business processes from sales to the factory floor.  We’re excited that we can grow into the solution and stay with it over the next five to seven years.”With its previous infrastructure consisting of standalone servers and storage, GLBC also faced increasing power and cooling demands. “With everything in the same box, PowerEdge MX substantially decreases our power and cooling costs and enhances our commitment to sustainability,” adds Apreutesei.With Dell EMC OpenManage Modular and iDRAC, the rollout was greatly simplified, providing E2E visibility from a single pane of glass“Our entire focus is to provide customers with absolutely the best packaging products that support their vision and business,” says Doree Quayle, Vice President of Sales. “We have to make sure that we’re evolving alongside our customers. That’s where our new ERP system and PowerEdge MX come into play—ensuring that our people have the tools needed to do their jobs.”Check out the Great Little Box Company case study for complete details on their upgraded IT infrastructure, and the crucial role the PowerEdge MX plays in it.To learn more about the PowerEdge MX modular platform, and our breakthrough kinetic architecture, visit dellemc.com and follow @DellEMCservers.last_img read more

Metro-grown produce

first_imgA tree may grow in Brooklyn, but fresh vegetables will soon grow in the heart of Atlanta on a plot of land the city’s mayor has designated as an urban farming educational site.The .8-acre plot is located at 104 Trinity Avenue across from city hall. It was most recently the site of the city’s traffic court. A competition to select a design for the Trinity Avenue Farm closed Nov 1. Judges are currently reviewing designs submitted by Georgia designers. Work on the farm design will begin soon after the winner is selected.The winning design team will be given $25,000 from Wal-Mart, the major sponsor of the project. Other partners include the Atlanta Mayor’s Office of Sustainability, Sustainable Atlanta, the Atlanta City Council, the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Georgia Organics and Truly Living Well.UGA Cooperative Extension agents in Fulton County assisted by testing the soil on the site and recommending steps to prepare the soil for plants by spring 2012. The agents will provide support for the garden by educating the farm’s managers on community gardening, locally-grown foods and fighting food desserts.The demonstration project will support the City of Atlanta’s “Power to Change” sustainability plan and its commitment to bring local food within 10 minutes of 75 percent of all residents by 2020. “Local, sustainable and organic food practices have numerous health and environmental benefits,” said Susan Varlamoff, UGA’s director of environmental sciences. “Local food is often fresher, eliminates negative externalities, such as carbon emissions, and supports our local economy. We applaud Mayor Reed and the city for joining the local food movement by showcasing urban agriculture right in the heart of downtown.”last_img read more

Harvard researchers want more ‘crappy’ tests for COVID-19

first_imgThe aphorism “perfect is the enemy of good enough” has been played out to tragic effect in the US’s inadequate testing for the coronavirus, according to researchers calling for quick tests that cost only about a dollar each, and which may not be as accurate but can be carried out several times a week by the whole population.Michael Mina, assistant professor of epidemiology at Harvard University, has for weeks been pushing for what he calls “crappy” tests. His idea is to move away from the current high-precision molecular tests, known as PCR tests, which are still scarce in large swathes of the country and which people often have to wait hours to get done, and then have to wait days — or up to a week — for the results.  He has called for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to authorize the sale of rapid tests which can be done out at home using a strip of paper that changes color in a quarter of an hour to give a result, similar to a pregnancy test.These tests have a low sensitivity, which means they miss a lot of positive results, and hence give a lot of “false positives,”But for Mina and other experts, such a strategy would be more effective in terms of public health because across the whole population, the number of cases identified would be higher than under the current system.The quick tests tend to be good at detecting people who emit a large amount of virus, which is when they are more contagious, right at the beginning, while the PCR tests are very sensitive and can detect even small concentrations of the virus, when people are no longer as contagious.   “We’re so focused on high-end expensive tests that we’re not testing anyone,” said Mina in the podcast “This Week in Virology.””Maybe we only need a really crappy test,’ he said.”If it’s cheap enough to use it very frequently, then if it doesn’t detect less than five percent of people when they’re transmitting, maybe it detects 85 percent of people when they’re transmitting. And that’s a huge win over what we have right now.”The head of Harvard’s Global Health Institute, Ashish Jha, touched on the subject on Monday.”They’re not actually crappy tests,” he told reporters. “In certain circumstances they are not so sensitive when you have very low amounts of virus, and you’re not doing much spreading. But when you’re actually really infectious, you have large amounts of virus in your throat elsewhere and the test becomes much, much better,” he said.”From an epidemiologic point of view, that’s when you want to capture people. You want to get them when they’re infectious,” he said.Even if rapid tests miss half the cases, it is likely that with two tests a week, they will end up detecting them.It must also be noted that the current system is thought to be missing nine cases out of ten because so few people are being tested, according to estimates by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  The FDA has still not authorized the sale of any of the paper strip tests, which would cost between one and five dollars.”I’m worried that our federal government is still stuck in a mental model that doesn’t make sense for this pandemic,” said Jha.Topics :last_img read more