UVU Baseball Meets Utah Tuesday in Non-Conference Tilt

first_imgFellow junior right-hander Paxton Schultz leads Utah Valley with 57 strikeouts on the season. Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSALT LAKE CITY-Tuesday, Utah Valley baseball (8-27, 5-7 in WAC play) meets the University of Utah (10-19, 3-12 in Pac-12 play) at Smith’s Ballpark. Senior left-handed pitcher Joshua Tedeschi (4-3 on the season) has inched over .500 and remains the ace of the Utes’ staff. He is also third on the staff in strikeouts with 26. The Wolverines are led on the season by senior outfielder Ryan Eastburn (a .352 batting average) while junior outfielder Alexander Marco (28 home runs, 6 RBI) leads Utah Valley in each of those categories. April 16, 2019 /Sports News – Local UVU Baseball Meets Utah Tuesday in Non-Conference Tilt The Utes are led by junior infielder Oliver Dunn (a .353 batting average, 16 RBI, 2 home runs), senior outfielder Erick Migueles and redshirt junior catcher Zack Moeller (symmetrically with 3 home runs and 25 RBI apiece). Tags: Alexander Marco/Erick Migueles/Jesse Schmit/Joshua Tedeschi/Oliver Dunn/Paxton Schultz/Ryan Eastburn/Smith’s Ballpark/UCCU Ballpark/Utah Baseball/UVU Baseball/Zack Moeller The Utes lead the all-time series against the Wolverines 30-23, including a 16-10 mark at Salt Lake City. The squads will meet again April 23 at UCCU Ballpark in Orem. Junior right-handed pitcher Jesse Schmit (2-5 on the season) has the Wolverines’ best record on the mound. Fellow senior left-hander Kyle Robeniol and sophomore right-handed hurler Brett Brocoff have 27 strikeouts apiece for the Utes. Brad Jameslast_img read more

HMAS Newcastle Completes Intensive Counter-Terrorism Operation

first_img View post tag: Defence HMAS Newcastle Completes Intensive Counter-Terrorism Operation View post tag: Defense Share this article View post tag: completes View post tag: Counter- terrorism View post tag: Naval View post tag: HMAS View post tag: Navycenter_img View post tag: Intensive Back to overview,Home naval-today HMAS Newcastle Completes Intensive Counter-Terrorism Operation In July, HMAS Newcastle completed an intensive counter-terrorism focused operation in the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden with the multi-national Combined Task Force 150 (CTF 150).During the focused operation, Newcastle executed 58 boarding actions, three replenishment activities with foreign ships and five deterrence transits of the Bab-el-Mandeb strait (BAM).The BAM, which translated from Arabic means the ‘Gate of Grief’, is a critical choke point that connects the Gulf of Aden to the Southern Red Sea, leading north to the Suez Canal. The narrow body of water is part of a global shipping network that connects the West and the East. It is frequently used by ships travelling from Europe to nations whose maritime boarders are on the Indian Ocean. CTF 150 estimates that between 55 and 65 merchant ships transit the BAM daily.Principal Warfare Officer, Lieutenant Mike Forsythe described the BAM as a high risk area for terrorism related activities.“It is high risk because of the width of the strait and the number of small boats that operate in it,” Lieutenant Forsythe said.“The aims of the coalition and regional partners involved in the focused operation were to build a better understanding of the patterns of life in the area, to deter terrorist activities, and restrict the terrorist’s freedom of movement,” he said.The boarding actions executed byNewcastle during the focused operation were Approach and Assist Visits (AAV), which are conducted regularly by coalition warships to build rapport with local mariners and seek information on what they may have seen in the area. The visits allow the coalition ships to collect intelligence on patterns of illegal activity.Newcastle used her S-70-B2 Seahawk helicopter to survey the area of operations to gather intelligence on patterns of life and identify targets for her Boarding Party to visit.During the focused operation, Newcastle also conducted three replenishment activities with coalition ships, from France and the United States, to take on fuel and stores ensuring that Newcastle could remain in the area and focused on her mission.The Australian crew battled through 97 percent humidity for more than four hours to complete one of the Replenishment at Sea (RAS) evolutions with the United States Naval Service oiler USNS Patuxent, which included a Heavy Jackstay. Newcastle also conducted her first evening RAS with French Ship (FS)Somme, their third replenishment  activity together since Newcastle arrived in the Middle East Area of Operation (MEAO).The focused operation was a true multi-national affair with the Australian warship interacting with British, French, U.S. and Spanish units.“The BAM is an important strategic strait to the international community. Without it, ships would have to transit all the way around Africa. We all have an interest in the security of this region,” Lieutenant Forsythe said.On completion of the counter-terrorism focused operation, Newcastle was assigned to another CTF 150 operation – targeting the smuggling of weapons.CTF 150 is one of three task forces operated by the Combined Maritime Forces (CMF), a 28-nation coalition based in Bahrain. The principle mission of CTF 150 is to deter, disrupt and defeat attempts by international terrorist organisations to use the maritime environment as a venue for attack or as a means to transport personnel, weapons and other materials.Newcastle is in the Middle East Area of Operations (MEAO) assigned to Operation SLIPPER – the Australian Defence Force (ADF) contribution to the international campaign against terrorism, counter smuggling and counter piracy in the Gulf of Aden, and enhancing regional maritime security and engagement. Her deployment is the 55th rotation of an Australian warship to the MEAO since 1990.[mappress]Press Release, August 30, 2013; Image: Australian Navy View post tag: Newcastle View post tag: News by topic View post tag: operation August 30, 2013last_img read more

IKE CSG holds anti-submarine drill with Turkish Navy

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today US aircraft carrier holds anti-submarine drill with Turkish Navy US aircraft carrier holds anti-submarine drill with Turkish Navy View post tag: US Navy Authorities June 27, 2016 Share this article View post tag: Ike CSG U.S., Turkish Navy ships during ASWEX. Photo: U.S. NavyShips assigned to the Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (Ike CSG) met with Turkish naval forces to stage an anti-submarine warfare exercise on June 25.Shortened to ASWEX, the exercise was designed to utilize the navies’ skills while defending multiple units from possible sub-surface threats.“Anti-submarine warfare is a major component in protecting the U.S. homeland and reassuring our commitment to our NATO partners,” said Capt. Scott Switzer, commander of Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 26 and the sea combat commander for Ike CSG. “Working with our counterparts in the Turkish Navy helps hone our skills and amplifies our interoperability for future missions.”The ASWEX, Ike CSG’s second since departing homeport June 1, focused on communication, maneuvering and surveillance and was executed from the guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94).“This is a great opportunity to work with Turkey and to practice all components of anti-submarine warfare,” said Lt. Alex Coker, submarine operations officer for DESRON 26. “The exercise execution was safe and professional for all units involved.”The centerpiece of the group, aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69)(Ike) and embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3, also took part in an air-defense exercise along with Turkish naval forces ships.The ADEX portion required communication between participating ships and aircraft in order to share tactical data and carry out a safe exercise.“All units in the carrier strike group must work together to maintain the recognized air picture,” said Lt. Mathew Rechkemmer, the air and missile defense commander’s liaison officer to Ike CSG. “Our mission is to ensure all ships and aircraft are ready to defend themselves and protect the aircraft carrier at all times.”Throughout the exercise, each unit was responsible for its share of a collaborative effort, strengthening the interoperability between each nation’s military. The ships involved in the exercises include ships from the Ike CSG guided-missile cruiser USS San Jacinto (CG 56) and guided-missile destroyers Nitze and USS Mason (DDG 87); other U.S. ships operating in the area: USS Donald Cook (DDG 75), USS Porter (DDG 78), and the Turkish G-class frigates TCG Gemlik (F-492), TCG Gaziantep (F-490). View post tag: Turkish Navylast_img read more

Music Review: Vertigo

first_imgby Alexandra Paynter The first Vertigo this term had been dogged by misfortune; acts had backed out and new bands had to be found and sorted out at the last minute. Luckily this disaster wasn’t evident and didn’t spoil the evening. Jack Harris, an Imsoc regular, was the first to step up with his folk tune offerings. His songs dealt with topics ranging from bears to mountains to the flowers around him. They reminded one of stories heard as a child and soon he had a small group sitting around his feet, listening intently. Realising this he offered the rest of the cellar a chance to sit down, adding “Don’t just obey me; that’s fascism!” Much of his performance was of this rather surreal, delightful nature. His style was that of a storyteller and his soulful voice was comparable to the passion in David Gray’s “Babylon.” He kept the laughs going until he was ushered off stage for the next act.Dave House was an earnest, likeable South Londoner with the ghetto-complex of Jamie T and the lyrics of Lily Allen. He also has much in common with Get Cape. Wear Cape. Fly, to whose label he is signed. They both sing in American accents for no good reason – indeed, House’s voice is reminiscent more of Death Cab For Cutie‘s Ben Gibbard than Lily Allen‘s mockney gurnings. He was certainly fun, and very enjoyable, but his work is hardly groundbreaking. Many artists in London sing in exactly the same style and about the same things and House doesn’t exactly stand out from them. He certainly isn‘t bad, but he will need to step up his game if he is to be at the forefront of this new movement.Francois and the Atlas Mountains, however, were exceptional. In the vein of Architecture in Helsinki they used a variety of different instruments to produce a very funky folk sound. Headed by the ridiculously good looking Francois, possessor of a wonderfully soft French accent, the songs instantly sounded beautiful on an almost mystical level, without bothering with silly things like lyrics. However, they held the audience’s attention best during their most energetic songs, which brought out their eccentric, fun side, whereas their slower tracks work best on record. If you get a chance to see them, this band is a must and they may just become an instant favourite in your record collection.Photo of Francois and the Atlas Mountains by Alexandra Paynter.last_img read more

Environmental Lecture Series on Thursday: Diamondback Terrapins

first_imgLecture Description:As the only species of turtle in North America to be capable of living its entire life in brackish (a mix of salt and fresh) water, the diamondback terrapin is a decidedly unique turtle species. Come learn more about these fascinating turtles during a lecture by one of The Wetlands Institute’s research scientists, Brian Williamson. Topics discussed will include basic natural history of the species, the threats that they face, what The Wetlands Institute is doing to study and conserve them, and how you can help terrapins.Background:Founded in 1969 by Herbert Mills, The Wetlands Institute is a non-profit organization located in Stone Harbor, New Jersey. Our mission is to promote appreciation, understanding, and stewardship of coastal and wetland ecosystems through programs in research, conservation, and education. The diamondback terrapin will be the subject of a lecture Thursday, April 16 at the Ocean City Free Public LibraryThe Environmental Lecture Series at the Ocean City Free Public Library continues at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 16 with Brian Williamson, research scientist for The Wetlands Institute in Stone Harbor speaking about diamondback terrapins.The talk will be held in the Chris Maloney Lecture Hall at the library. It is free to attend and sponsored by the Ocean City Environmental Commission.last_img read more

Sep 1935

first_imgThe importance of seeing that everything is perfect cannot be overestimated. For instance, say you have made 24 Madeira cakes that are not all they should be. The batter may have been cold and, instead of being potential ’trade-getters’, the resultant cakes are a little tough.Many confectioners pass articles like these into their shops every week, never pausing to consider the homes where that weekend they will exclaim, “Blank’s cakes are not as nice as they were.” A suggestion will be made to mothers and wives that they try somewhere else the following week.last_img

Consumer preference for chocolate brownies

first_imgChocolate brownies have claimed the top spot in a survey, by Dawn Foods, to discover the nation’s favourite chocolate bakery treat.Following on from its research into the nation’s signature treat, during British Food Fortnight, Dawn carried out a further poll during National Chocolate Week (10-16 October 2011).The chocolate brownie took 28.6% of the votes, with the chocolate chip cookie achieving 19%, the double chocolate muffin 14.3%, and chocolate cake taking 14.3% of the votes.Dawn Foods marketing manager Jacqui Passmore commented: “Chocolate Week was the perfect time to quiz people on their favourite chocolate bakery treats and we were unsure which product would emerge victorious. “Chocolate brownies are, for many people, a rich comfort food that, along with a cup of tea or coffee, can satisfy any chocolate cravings. This result is the perfect example of how its popularity has grown in recent years.”>>Scones voted UK signature treatlast_img read more

Creative with Cognac

first_imgRenowned Cognac producer Rémy Martin and its sister brand Cointreau are to undergo something of a reinvention. Keen for both to be seen as young and fashionable brands, the Rémy Cointreau Group formed through a merger in 1990 of the holding firms of the Hériard Dubreuil and Cointreau families that controlled E Rémy Martin & Cie and Cointreau & Cie respectively has embarked on a mission to widen the appeal of these brands.The group has launched a ’premium gastronomy’ strategy and created sample recipes, to give its customers and potential customers ideas about how it is already used and how it can be used with food.Rémy Martin, established in 1724, specialises in the pro-duction of Fine Champagne Cognac, which it says is what makes it different to all the other Cognac producers in the region, which simply produce Cognac.Its Cognac is made using grapes from the Grande and Petite Champagne regions, which, as the name Champagne implies, are areas of chalky soil. Rémy makes around 80% of all the Fine Champagne Cognac in the world, and is proud of its heritage and of the brand it has built up. It does not want to be a mass-market competitor, but it is keen to increase its brand’s use at different times of the year other than Christmas. Victor Griffiths, field sales manager, Keylink, which supplies culinary alcohols, says the argument from manufacturers and retailers about using alcohol in food has always been that summer is a family time, but then what is Christmas if not a family-orientated celebration? And it is used in plenty of foods at that time of year.The group is also hoping to increase the incorporation of the culinary alcohol version of its Cointreau liqueur into a wider range of applications. Cointreau is an orange liquor made with natural sweet and bitter orange peels, so works well with ingredients such as chocolate. Frédéric Ratajczak, international sales director (gastronomy), explains that he wants to create a new sector for Cointreau, for use in summer desserts, and wants consumers to think of it as a very trendy brand. The liqueur was created in 1839 by a pastry-maker, to be used as a food ingredient in ganaches, for example. It then became a liqueur in its own right, but the company is keen for its use as a culinary alcohol to be expanded. Cointreau has been created at 60% proof for use in gastronomy, but it is needed for the flavour, not the alcohol content, says Ratajczak. Cointreau Concentrate is also sugar-free and offers less evaporation to its sister liqueur. Ratajczak says it has the highest essential oil content, compared to competitors, at 575mg/l, and the lowest sugar content at 240g/l. Rémy also offers a 54% variant that does contain some sugar this is only to be used for when a company wants to be able to say the product contains liqueur.Artisan baker Thierry Dumouchel, whose bakery Dumouchel in Garforth was a finalist for The Craft Business Award at the Baking Industry Awards this year, has been the brand ambassador for Rémy in the UK for around 14 years. He works with customers to develop recipes using Rémy Martin Fine Champagne Cognac and Cointreau, and says he can find a way to combine it with any ingredients you have in mind. His recipe suggestions include macarons, chocolate gateaux and patisserie (see side panel for his Cointreaupolitan Cupcake recipe, created exclusively for British Baker). The group already works with Crown Bakery, Marks & Spencer and Relais Desserts and, with its new strategy, is looking to develop a niche market with high profitability for its partners, and increase its brand awareness, by making use of its technical and marketing know-how. In addition, Griffiths is also a fully qualified chef and contributes on development concepts/recipes, with around eight years’ experience of consulting with NPD and innovation managers within the industry.During the visit, Dumouchel demonstrated some ways in which Rémy and Cointreau can be used in bakery and patisserie. He combined Rémy Martin with fig, passion fruit, dark chocolate, raspberry and cherry for example: filled choux pastry balls on a stick; small patisserie items such as fig purée topped with a circle of sponge, cream and chocolate; and mini cakes with a pipette of Cointreau to inject into the cake yourself. Dumouchel says the supermarkets are starting to look for something new. He says he now sells more individual mini cakes than big cakes at his bakery even though the smaller cakes are more expensive. Cointreaupolitan Cupcake recipe: l Cupcake size 4.5cm diameterl Makes 24IngredientsButter300gEgg300gCaster sugar300gSelf raising flour300gVanilla essence3gMethod1. Cream the butter and sugar until smooth and fluffy. Mix in vanilla essence2. Gradually beat in the egg3. Gradually add the sieved flour4. Pipe into the cupcake/bun cases (45g per case)Cosmopolitan CocktailVodka50gCointreau25gCranberry juice20gLime juice10gMix all of the above together. Reserve 50g for the butter cream. Drizzle the rest over the cupcakes.ButtercreamUnsalted butter250gEgg white 100g (whisked)Sugar200gWater60gMethod1. Bring the water and sugar to 120C in a pan2. Pour the cooked sugar over the whisked egg white. Whisk together to form a meringue until cool (Italian meringue)3. Soften the butter and mix with the remaining 50g of cocktail4. Fold into the meringue until smooth, then pipe on to the cooled cupcakes.5. Decorate as required.last_img read more

Library considers renovations

first_imgFifty years ago, in 1962 , the cornerstone of the Hesburgh Library was laid.  When the towering, 14-story structure opened in 1963, it was the largest college library in the world and a forward-looking model for research and study. But Diane Parr Walker, Edward H. Arnold university librarian, said the library is now in a transition stage. Stacks are overflowing. Upper floors lack proper study space. Changes to services and space allocation, she said, are crucial for the library to fulfill its 21st century needs. “A 19th century library really was about books, much of the 20th century was about that as well, but a 21st century library is going to be about the mix of digital and physical formats, [about having] a lot of services and creating spaces that foster and encourage intellectual activity using both digital and physical collections,” she said. Walker, who began her position as university librarian in July, served as deputy university librarian at the University of Virginia before coming to Notre Dame.  She spent the past few months getting to know campus and listening to the various concerns of faculty and students. Walker said her vision for the library is threefold: to increase physical and digital collections, expand expertise services and create more comfortable and inspiring study spaces.  “We have no intention of getting rid of the books,” Walker said. A few projects, including a library café and renovation of the first floor current periodicals area, are now in the planning stages. But the library lacks funding to launch a full-scale renovation.  “The University has a policy of not building or renovating until most of the money is in hand,” Walker said.  The library announced plans for Phase Two of the renovation in the spring of 2009, and construction on the first and second floors was targeted to begin in the summer of 2011.  Phase One, renovation of the lower level, was completed in 2002. “The planning for that renovation of the first two floors of the Hesburgh Library really got going just about the time the economy collapsed,” she said. “And so while we had donors pledging funds, in many cases they haven’t been able yet to make good on those pledges.” Faculty and staff started a petition in the summer of 2009, arguing the proposed Phase Two renovation would be insufficient and the entire library system, not just the two main floors, needed restructuring.  Those renovation plans were shelved in 2010, Walker said. She said the library is now “stepping back” to develop a program plan for the entire building, but will not begin speaking to architects again until more funding comes through. Walker said several initiatives would be completed independently of the longer-term renovation.  In time for graduation, the current periodicals area on the first floor will be renovated with new study spaces and technologies from the Office of Information Technologies (OIT). The room will have new carpeting, beanbag chairs, study booths, soft seating,  reading tables, and if funding comes through, a video wall for group presentations. “We’re going to see what we can do to enliven the space,” Walker said. “It’s a space that doesn’t seem to be particularly well-used, but it’s very, very visible.” By next fall, the library will have new listening and viewing equipment in the music and media area on the second floor. Walker said these spaces will be conducive both to individual and collaborative work. “I’m also hoping that this will help with fundraising when we can show prospective donors the kinds of things that we envision for the building,” she said. Walker discussed the possibility of a café, which could open as early as the fall of 2013 in what is currently the vending room space in the library’s concourse. “We’re talking with Food Services now about the possibility of converting the vending room space … into an actual café, so they’re thinking that they’ll begin talking with franchises that might be interested,” Walker said. “This summer, Facilities [Operations] plans to renew the pavers on the terrace in front, so we’re also talking about what might be done to change the landscaping, allow for … some outside seating there, and a doorway [where] you could get out to the terrace from a café.” Library shelving is almost entirely full, Walker said, both in the main and branch libraries. She said she is speaking with the Office of the Provost to identify a space for remote shelving close to campus.  “We can deliver things that are there as we now deliver around the campus, so that we don’t have to use all of the floor space in the library for stacks,” she said. For the future longer-term renovation, Walker said she imagines the first floor as a “hub of activity” and the second floor as more focused, housing print collections, group study rooms and expertise for music, media and art. The upper floors, Walker said, could be imagined as “oases of contemplation” that serve the needs of book-based work but are not crowded with stacks. She said the biggest challenge the library will face in becoming a 21st century library will be balancing competing needs of faculty and students.  “Students tell me that the most important thing about the libraries is space, faculty and graduate students tell me that the most important thing is collections and services. It will be important to strike the right balance,” she said.  Walker said she hopes smaller-scale projects the library is taking on now will encourage greater support of the renovation.  “I’m hoping that we can generate a lot of excitement around the idea that a great way to celebrate the 50th anniversary would be to actually kick off a thorough renovation,” she said.,Fifty years ago, in 1962 , the cornerstone of the Hesburgh Library was laid.  When the towering, 14-story structure opened in 1963, it was the largest college library in the world and a forward-looking model for research and study. But Diane Parr Walker, Edward H. Arnold university librarian, said the library is now in a transition stage. Stacks are overflowing. Upper floors lack proper study space. Changes to services and space allocation, she said, are crucial for the library to fulfill its 21st century needs. “A 19th century library really was about books, much of the 20th century was about that as well, but a 21st century library is going to be about the mix of digital and physical formats, [about having] a lot of services and creating spaces that foster and encourage intellectual activity using both digital and physical collections,” she said. Walker, who began her position as university librarian in July, served as deputy university librarian at the University of Virginia before coming to Notre Dame.  She spent the past few months getting to know campus and listening to the various concerns of faculty and students. Walker said her vision for the library is threefold: to increase physical and digital collections, expand expertise services and create more comfortable and inspiring study spaces.  “We have no intention of getting rid of the books,” Walker said. A few projects, including a library café and renovation of the first floor current periodicals area, are now in the planning stages. But the library lacks funding to launch a full-scale renovation.  “The University has a policy of not building or renovating until most of the money is in hand,” Walker said.  The library announced plans for Phase Two of the renovation in the spring of 2009, and construction on the first and second floors was targeted to begin in the summer of 2011.  Phase One, renovation of the lower level, was completed in 2002. “The planning for that renovation of the first two floors of the Hesburgh Library really got going just about the time the economy collapsed,” she said. “And so while we had donors pledging funds, in many cases they haven’t been able yet to make good on those pledges.” Faculty and staff started a petition in the summer of 2009, arguing the proposed Phase Two renovation would be insufficient and the entire library system, not just the two main floors, needed restructuring.  Those renovation plans were shelved in 2010, Walker said. She said the library is now “stepping back” to develop a program plan for the entire building, but will not begin speaking to architects again until more funding comes through. Walker said several initiatives would be completed independently of the longer-term renovation.  In time for graduation, the current periodicals area on the first floor will be renovated with new study spaces and technologies from the Office of Information Technologies (OIT). The room will have new carpeting, beanbag chairs, study booths, soft seating,  reading tables, and if funding comes through, a video wall for group presentations. “We’re going to see what we can do to enliven the space,” Walker said. “It’s a space that doesn’t seem to be particularly well-used, but it’s very, very visible.” By next fall, the library will have new listening and viewing equipment in the music and media area on the second floor. Walker said these spaces will be conducive both to individual and collaborative work. “I’m also hoping that this will help with fundraising when we can show prospective donors the kinds of things that we envision for the building,” she said. Walker discussed the possibility of a café, which could open as early as the fall of 2013 in what is currently the vending room space in the library’s concourse. “We’re talking with Food Services now about the possibility of converting the vending room space … into an actual café, so they’re thinking that they’ll begin talking with franchises that might be interested,” Walker said. “This summer, Facilities [Operations] plans to renew the pavers on the terrace in front, so we’re also talking about what might be done to change the landscaping, allow for … some outside seating there, and a doorway [where] you could get out to the terrace from a café.” Library shelving is almost entirely full, Walker said, both in the main and branch libraries. She said she is speaking with the Office of the Provost to identify a space for remote shelving close to campus.  “We can deliver things that are there as we now deliver around the campus, so that we don’t have to use all of the floor space in the library for stacks,” she said. For the future longer-term renovation, Walker said she imagines the first floor as a “hub of activity” and the second floor as more focused, housing print collections, group study rooms and expertise for music, media and art. The upper floors, Walker said, could be imagined as “oases of contemplation” that serve the needs of book-based work but are not crowded with stacks. She said the biggest challenge the library will face in becoming a 21st century library will be balancing competing needs of faculty and students.  “Students tell me that the most important thing about the libraries is space, faculty and graduate students tell me that the most important thing is collections and services. It will be important to strike the right balance,” she said.  Walker said she hopes smaller-scale projects the library is taking on now will encourage greater support of the renovation.  “I’m hoping that we can generate a lot of excitement around the idea that a great way to celebrate the 50th anniversary would be to actually kick off a thorough renovation,” she said.last_img read more

Ave Maria Press serves national Catholic community

first_imgAcross St. Joseph’s Lake, past Moreau Seminary and beyond Moreau Drive, there stands a flat, unassuming building adorned in brick familiar to the quads of Notre Dame. But despite its ordinary appearance, the building is home to one of America’s oldest and largest Catholic publishing houses, complete with over a century and a half worth of history. Thomas Murphy | The Observer Ave Maria Press, founded by Fr. Sorin in 1865, sits on the far north edge of campus. Once a magazine, they are now a leading publisher of Catholic books.It was Fr. Edward Sorin, Notre Dame’s founder, who established Ave Maria Press in 1865. The press has since found its way into the homes, parishes and schools of Catholics across the country.Ave Maria Press CEO and publisher Thomas Grady said Sorin founded the press in honor of Saint Mary in order to provide spiritual direction to the growing community of Catholics in America.“Fr. Sorin had apparently long dreamed of starting a Catholic press in the United States,” Grady said. “ … He wanted to showcase the best Catholic writing in the country and provide sustenance and nourishment to a largely immigrant Catholic community at the time.”Sorin began working on his dream by buying a printing press in Chicago, hauling the machinery back to Notre Dame and setting it all up in Brownson Hall. Out of these humble origins grew Ave Maria Magazine, which quickly became a popular national publication featuring Catholic history, theology, children’s stories, poetry and biographies of saints.As Notre Dame grew and Sorin took on more responsibility at the University, he turned the press over to Sister Angela Gilsepie, who had previously served as a nurse in the Civil War. By 1900, Ave Maria Magazine was the most popular Catholic magazine in America.But as time wore on and trends in Catholic readership changed, Ave Maria Magazine’s circulation declined. In 1970, after 105 years of publication, Ave Maria Magazine came to an end. The end of this era, however, became the beginning of a new one as Ave Maria Press focused its efforts on publishing books, again hoping to feature the best Catholic writing in the country.Now, 154 years after its founding, Ave Maria Press is a leader in American Catholic publishing, especially in high school textbooks, Grady said. He estimates the company has books in over 50 percent of the 1,200 Catholic high schools in the country, holding “46 percent of the Catholic high school market in terms of the number of books sold.”The nature of the publishing industry is always changing, and in recent years Ave Maria Press has expanded its business into e-books and videos. In fact, Ave Maria Press no longer physically prints books and works only as a publisher, Grady said.Through its many evolutions, Grady said Ave Maria Press has remained determined to serve and nourish the spiritual lives of Catholics.“The nature of the mission hasn’t changed,” he said. “As a ministry of Holy Cross … it’s our mission, in the words of Holy Cross, to make God known, loved and served and to operate and act as what Holy Cross calls ‘educators in the faith.’ So, our mission has been conversion of hearts, formation of Catholics and ongoing nourishment of those Catholics in the Church and in their spiritual lives.”The business of publishing demands variety and value from all market entities. Senior publicist Stephanie A. Sibal said the aim of promoting Catholic families and faith is consistent throughout the many books and products Ave Maria Press publishes.“The variety of books that we publish each season, a goal of a lot of them is to strengthen the faith of average Catholics in the pew,” Sibal said. “We’re building the Church by providing resources — whether it’s a high school textbook or a prayer book or a book on spirituality or a book on apologetics — we’re helping to build the knowledge of the Church and deepen people’s faith.”Associate publisher and director of sales and marketing Karey Circosta said employees at the Ave Maria Press take pride not only in their work’s purpose, but also in its quality.“We are a ministry, but we’re also here, we’re trying to sell lots of books that promote our ministry and at the same time making really good ones,” Circosta said. “Everybody is dedicated to that throughout the whole company.”Sibal said Ave Maria Press’ impact on the Church is what motivates her work.“I think that we’re providing a great service to the Church,” Sibal said. “One of the reasons I like working here is because I feel like I’m working for the Church and I’m helping to spread my faith.”Several of the employees at Ave Maria Press had worked at secular publishing houses before arriving at the ministry. Grady said working at the press has allowed him to join together the facets of his life in a way most others cannot.“I’ve been in publishing for 40 years this year, and this is really the first time that I’ve been able to unite my spiritual faith, my Catholic faith, with my work,” Grady said. “ … It’s nice to not have to compartmentalize your work life and your personal life.”Tags: American Catholicism, Ave Maria Press, Catholicism, congregation of holy cross, Father Sorin, Fr. Edward Sorin, publishing, Sister Angela Gilsepielast_img read more