LACE to Provide Business Start-Up Grants for Youth

first_imgLove thanked LACE and other stakeholders of the project for putting smiles on her face-Launches House Hold Enterprise Sub-component of YOP; targets 15,000A project intended to provide business start-up grants for youth in 10 communities in Montserrado County has been launched by the Government of Liberia (GoL) through the Liberia Agency for Community Empowerment (LACE) and House Hold Enterprise (HHE) sub-component.The HHE, which was launched on Monday, April 16, is a sub-component of the Youth Opportunities Project, which will provide business start-up grants for youth and life-skills training to select beneficiaries to properly manage their own businesses.Joseph Williams, LACE Executive Director, said the initiative is part of the government’s plan to help create an enabling environment for young people between the ages of 18-35 and to create their own revenue through household enterprise and agriculture-related activities.“This sub-component is targeting 3,000 beneficiaries over the 5-year implementation period of the Youth Opportunities Project (YOP),” he explained.He added that the project is being sponsored by the World Bank to the tone of US$10 million. Mr. Williams commended the World Bank for the support, which he noted will go a long way for the young people of Liberia and the benefiting communities.The LACE Deputy Executive Director further noted that the project is placed into several components but LACE is focused on two components to include: The Household enterprise and the Productive, Public Works and life skills support.The ministries of Youth and Sports, as well as Gender, Children and Social Protection, and the Liberia Agency for Community Empowerment are the sole implementing partners under the YOP program.After the transparent lottery process, Williams said, 80 beneficiaries will be selected and they will go through a three-week youth orientation training by the service provider Education Care. After the training, the group will be divided into eight and each group will receive US$2,500 as a start-up.At the completion of the training, Education Care, the service provider, will identify the line of businesses for the beneficiaries and will place them in a group of eight and subsequently work with them for its effective establishment.In a symbolic style to show the transparency of the lottery exercise, Williams shook a white bucket in front of the participants and picked one of the tickets that identified Ms. Love Kromah as the first lucky winner. In a brief interview with reporters, Ms. Kromah thanked LACE and other stakeholders of the project for putting a smile on her face.She promised to utilize wisely whatever she will receive from the project, in a move to sustain herself. West Point, Sonewhein, Logan Town, Clara Town and many others are part of the communities benefiting from the project.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

DemBake hosts medical outreach at Land of Canaan

first_imgDemerara Bakery and the Giving Hope Foundation in collaboration with the Public Health Ministry, on Saturday hosted a medical outreach offering free cancer screening for both men and women in Land of Canaan and surrounding communities on the East Bank of Demerara.Dr Latoya Gooding and Dave LaltooPresident and founder of the Giving Hope Foundation, Dr Latoya Gooding noted that they were approached by DemBake to offer free cancer screening to residents and they readily agreed. Additionally, Dr Gooding explained that the outreach is part of their monthly exercises and made a call for more men to access the services offered.“We have decided to come and offer free cancer screening here at DemBake for the Land of Canaan population and surrounding areas. Here today what we are offering is free breast examination, pap smear, VIA [Visual Inspection with Acetic Acid], prostate checks that include the digital rectal examination and the prostate specific antigen blood test. We’re also offering free blood pressure and sugar testing,” the doctor told Guyana Times.The Giving Hope Foundation is a non-governmental organisation with the objective of trying to reduce the incidence of late stage cancer diagnosis in Guyana. They are going into communities to have outreaches and to educate the population in relation to cancer.“We always work in collaboration with the Ministry of Public Heath, the Chronic Disease Department because what we are doing is aligning with what they are doing as well, so we always tag along with them or we tag them along with us. We spread the word because cancer cannot be a one organisation, it takes a nation and the more organisations we have fighting cancer, better response we will have,” she added.Meanwhile, Administrative Manager of Demerara Bakery, Dave Laltoo said the aim of the outreach is to collaborate and give back to the community. He noted that this is the first project of its kind undertaken by the newly relaunched bakery.“One of things we noticed is when you go to the public hospitals and so persons do not have the opportunity to have this done free of cost and what the Giving Hope Foundation does is they have a strict free policy so we wanted to collaborate and give back to Giving Hope Foundation through the community,” Laltoo noted.There were three doctors and four nurses offering services to the residents of the area. The organisers expected to have over one hundred residents accessing the services.last_img read more

Rose Hall sugar workers intensify protest against closure

first_imgWorkers attached to the Rose Hall Sugar Factory in East Canje, Berbice have intensified their protest action against the impending closure of the estate.On Thursday, factory and field workers, accompanied by their family members and bolstered by sections of the business community and taxi drivers, marched from the Rose Hall factory to the entrance of East Canje — a distance of four miles — to signal their frustration at the APNU/AFC Coalition Administration’s decision, as announced on Monday by Agriculture Minister Noel Holder, to close the sugar estate by year end.Rose Hall sugar workers on Thursday intensified their protest action against the impending closure of the estateFollowing an earlier announcement made by President David Granger that Rose Hall is one of the estates tabled to be closed, workers had staged several small demonstrations in hope of getting the attention of the Agriculture Ministry before its subject minister presented the promised ‘white paper’ in the National Assembly last Monday.The realisation of what is likely to happen as a result of Government’s controversial decision has hit home, and the workers have expectedly reacted.In a release, the Guyana Agricultural and General Workers Union (GAWU) referred to the protesters as being large in number.“The workers are justifiably concerned over their future, which appears bleak if the Government pursues closure as it says. Regular employment is hard to come by, and closure of the estate will aggravate this problem in the area. It is such concerns that are prompting workers to come together and unitedly call on the APNU/AFC Government to ensure that Rose Hall Estate remains operable”, a release from GAWU has said.The release said Government closed Wales Estate last year, leaving many of that estate’s 1,700 workers now jobless and despairing. At the end of this year, Rose Hall and Enmore/LBI Estates are to be closed, as disclosed in Government’s ‘white paper’ on sugar, presented to the National Assembly on May 8.“The Berbice protestors were in an angry mood as they visualise hardships that await them, and the real prospects of destitution of them and their families that are expectedly in store if the Estate is allowed to go to the gallows at the end of this year,” GAWU has said.“The unconscionable anti-working class action by the Government, which failed to conduct a study of the consequences of its rash and haphazard decision, will impact seriously the victims – workers, pensioners, housewives, children, vendors and others”, the GAWU statement continued.“The Rose Hall workers recognise the need and importance to continue their united struggle, which they hope to sustain with greater solidarity in their courageous efforts to defend their jobs, their rights, their families, and ensure a secure and dignified future”, the GAWU statement concludes.GAWU official Seepaul Narine, who was a part of Thursday’s protest, said the workers are now upset following Monday’s announcement. He said they are convinced that what is happening is the perpetuation of a wrong decision.“So this morning you have more than one thousand workers who have come out to register their protest against the administration. We are asking the Government and GuySuCo to review this decision, because it is a decision that will hurt everyone who is employed and also those who are not employed with GuySuCo, because the Rose Hall Estate is the source of sustenance for many villages around,” he explained.He said the employees will be directly affected and the spin-off effect will affect businesses and the community as a whole. “There is no study as to what the workers will do when the estate is closed. We need them to go back to the drawing board,” he posited.Narine said the protest will continue, and is likely to intensify.Meanwhile, Region Six Chairman David Armogan explained that the decision will not only affect those at GuySuCo, but everyone in Region Six.He said the workers are being fooled by Government into thinking that alternative employment will be provided. “They are telling the people that alternative employment will be provided at Albion and Blairmont; but if you are reducing the cultivation to just about 2000 acres from what it is presently at 9000, you are knocking out about 7000 acres. So what will happen to those workers who were involved in the cultivation of the other 7000 acres?” he asked.Armogan said it is time Government comes straight in informing the sugar workers about the future, and there also is need for consultation, since it is obvious that there is no plan on the way forward if the estate does close. (Andrew Carmichael)last_img read more

Dejected Medo tears into Nakumatt bosses

first_img0Shares0000Nakumatt FC head coach Melis Medo reacts on the touchline during the club’s Kenyan Premier League match against Vihiga United on October 7, 2018. PHOTO/Timothy OlobuluNAIROBI, Kenya, Oct 8 – Nakumatt FC head coach Melis Medo has torn into the club’s management over the team’s failure to automatically cling onto the Kenyan Premier League (KPL), with the side now faced with a play-off to determine whether or not they will continue playing into the top tier.Nakumatt slumped into the play-off after Sunday’s 2-0 loss to Vihiga United in Ruaraka with the coach among other things lamenting that the players have gone three months without pay while according to him a sponsor has been ready to step in, but the club’s managers have been ‘lazy’. “We have a big sponsor waiting I don’t know why they don’t want to change the name… Delay delay delay delay…  I don’t know if its delay or laziness…. I don’t know what they are waiting for and it is costing this team,” the tactician told Capital Sport.He also took issue with the fact that they could not manage to secure Camp Toyoyo for their decider against Vihiga and had to play at Ruaraka, a pitch he says should not be hosting a KPL game.Nakumatt FC players converse in low tones after their defeat to Vihiga United during their Kenyan Premier League match on October 7, 2018. PHOTO/Raymond MakhayaHe added; “Again, We shouldn’t be playing here. Because of laziness on our part we didn’t register camp Toyoyo. Again, we couldn’t get Thika and we have to play on this pitch in Ruaraka.”The American born Egyptian coach says it has been difficult to motivate the players with the situation. Despite the club getting a new owner in politician Francis Mureithi, things haven’t gone as well as they would have expected.“You don’t expect much from players having not been paid for three months. They should earn a trophy as a matter of fact, we showed up fought and did our part. I don’t believe they (Vihiga) were better than us. We just had two mistakes and they scored two goals.”“For Gor Mahia, it was only one month and they did not train. For, us, it is three months and we have showed up and fought. These boys are fighters. I will never blame them. Before when we were doing okay, pay was on time and everything was on time. You can’t push them so much for 90 days. Half of the players are locked out of their homes,” Medo added.The tactician nonetheless is optimistic that if something is done between now and when they take part in the play-off, they will retain their status in the KPL.Nakumatt FC head coach Melis Medo passes instructions to Kevin Thairu and Tom Adwar during their defeat to Vihiga United in a Kenyan Premier League match on October 7, 2018. PHOTO/Timothy OlobuluNakumatt will face either Nairobi Stima or Ushuru in the play-off with the National Super League yet to be concluded.“At this point, it is not me. I did my part, infact I did more than my part but the owner needs to take care of his team. I am sure we will remain in the league if everything is taken care of,” further noted the coach.Nakumatt’s tribulations started last year when their parent company, supermarket chain Nakumatt Holdings started experiencing financial difficulties.They were handed a reprieve mid this year when politician Mureithi bought off the club, but despite a good start, things haven’t flown as smooth as was expected.0Shares0000(Visited 3 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

Chatsworth Historical Society pioneer gets name on museum

first_imgThe museum and preserved home are both part of the homestead, where paths meander past gardens and fruit trees. The one-room museum includes American Indian artifacts and photographs of families who settled in the area. Watson founded the Chatsworth Historical Society in 1963, and one of the group’s first major projects was to help save and move the original Chatsworth Community Church to the Oakwood Memorial Park where it still stands today. “There are still a bunch of us old-timers here who work and care for Chatsworth,” said Lillian Schepler, treasurer for the Chatsworth Historical Society. “We’ve had a wonderful life here,” she said. “Chatsworth has been so good to us.” Many who attended the event were unaware of Chatsworth’s early days, of those first families who settled on the land after President Abraham Lincoln signed the Homestead Act in 1862. The historic decree allowed any qualified citizen or intended citizen to acquire up to 160 acres of federal land in the West, free of charge. “I had seen these buildings before, but I had no idea what they were and what they meant,” said Elizabeth Puno, 55, of Reseda. Others said the event itself offered great history lessons. “I went panning for gold, I made butter, and I liked the bean bag race,” said Kristin Long, an 8-year-old Chatsworth resident. “And we learned to polish stones.” Her mother, Lisa Long, said they had come to the event at the last minute, but managed to experience more than they had expected. “It’s been a great outing,” Lisa Long said. “It’s a beautiful park and it’s been a wonderful day.” susan.abram@dailynews.com (818) 713-3664160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! CHATSWORTH – Virginia Watson helped bring the pioneers of Chatsworth home again. And in return for decades of work, Watson received what she called the best gift she could ever imagine on Sunday: Her name was emblazoned on a small, yet historically vibrant, museum she helped to establish. “I was terribly surprised,” the 86-year-old woman said after the ceremony. “It’s the greatest gift anyone could ever give to me.” Watson was honored during the annual Chatsworth Historical Society Pioneer Days, held on an acre stretch of land where the early-20th-century Hill-Palmer Homestead Cottage still stands inside Chatsworth Park. last_img read more

Chelsea announce signing of defender Matt Miazga from New York Red Bulls

first_imgChelsea have completed the signing of central defender Matt Miazga from New York Red Bulls.Miazga, who made his debut for the Red Bulls shortly after his 18th birthday, has signed a four-and-a-half year contract at Stamford Bridge.Boss Guus Hiddink confirmed on Friday that Miaza has been signed primarily as a “squad player” for the remainder of the season.Miazga said: ‘I am very happy to sign for Chelsea, a world-famous club with a reputation for major success. I am delighted to be in the Premier League, the best league in the world, and can’t wait to meet my team-mates and get going.“I am still at the beginning of my career but I believe this is the place to develop and learn from some of the best players in the world.”Hiddink had been keen to bolster his defensive options after it became increasingly clear a new move for Everton’s John Stones will have to wait until the summer.There is also a question mark over the future of Gary Cahill who has become increasingly unsettled with his lack of first-team opportunities.However Hiddink insisted this week that Cahill would be staying at Stamford Bridge and remained a vital part of his future plans. 1 Matt Miazga last_img read more

‘Footage’ of John Jensen receiving his Denmark squad list

first_imgJohn Jensen admitted he had to ask who his players were at what position they played in ahead of Denmark’s loss to Slovakia.Jensen answered his nation’s call when it was revealed first team stars were staying because of a dispute over commercial image rights between the Danish Football Association and the players’ union (Spillerne).It meant Futsal players and amateur footballers represented Denmark instead.“I had to start from scratch and ask each player his name and which position he plays on the field,” Jensen told a news conference. It reminded talkSPORT.com of a scene in Mike Bassett: England Manager.In the 2001 film, Bassett, played by Ricky Tomlinson, writes his squad list down on the back of a cigarette packet leading to unexpected call-ups for lower league players Ron Benson and Tony Hedges. impact How the Premier League table could change after the Boxing Day fixtures BEST OF Forbes list reveals how much Mayweather, Ronaldo and Messi earned this decade silverware RANKED Best clips, calls and talkSPORT moments of 2019, feat Hearn, McCoist and more Top nine Premier League free transfers of the decade Every Championship club’s best signing of the decade, including Taarabt and Dack REVEALED highlights center_img MONEY possible standings Most popular football news Ronaldo warned Lukaku how hard scoring goals in Serie A would be before Inter move Every current Premier League club’s best kit from the past decade Which teams do the best on Boxing Day in the Premier League era? smart causal ADVICE Every time Ally McCoist lost it on air in 2019, including funny XI reactions England’s most successful clubs of the past decade, according to trophies won last_img read more

South Africa’s first wine tourism exhibition

first_imgWine tourism will finally get its own official exhibition when the Vindaba takes place in September next year. (Image: Franschhoek Wine Route) MEDIA CONTACTS • André Morgenthal  Wosa communications manager  +27 21 883 3860 or +27 82 658 3883 RELATED ARTICLES • Wine route celebrates 40 years • SA wine farms invest in biodiversity • SA, France toast to wine exchange • SA wine bottles to lighten up • SA wines lead ‘green’ label driveShamin ChibbaTwo of South Africa’s leading industries, wine and tourism, will combine for the country’s first ever wine tourism exhibition.The Vindaba takes place at the Cape Town International Convention Centre (CTICC) in September next year and will run parallel with the Cape Wine exhibition at the same venue.The exhibition, backed by both national and provincial governments, will target the international travel trade as well as wine, travel and lifestyle media.According to André Morgenthal, Wines of South Africa’s (Wosa) communications manager, the Vindaba will look to exhibit the hotels, restaurants, wine routes, tour operators and farms that are linked to the wine industry.As South Africa is considered a world leader in eco-sustainable wine production, organisers aim to promote Vindaba as a green initiative by using recycled and recyclable materials.The Vindaba is the brainchild of Wosa, South African Tourism, Cape Town Tourism, Wine Routes, Cape Town Routes Unlimited and the Department of Finance, Tourism and Economic Development of the Western Cape.Morgenthal explained that the CTICC was chosen as a venue because it is able to accommodate the exhibition’s expected 1 000+ guests and more than 320 wineries and 100 travel trade organisations.Though the Vindaba and Cape Wine are taking place at the same time, Morgenthal said they target two different industries. The former looks to attract international tour operators who specifically offer wine tours, while the latter targets wine traders.SA part of the global wine tourism industryWine tourism contributes R5-billion (US$720-million) of the local wine industry’s annual R22-billion ($3.2-billion) turnover.Speaking at a stakeholder’s workshop in April this year, tourism minister Marthinus van Schalkwyk said wine tourism is currently one of the fastest growing sectors in the global tourism market. He further stated that it should be central in marketing South Africa as a long-haul destination.Van Schalkwyk added that wine tourism provides the country with a competitive edge when it comes to the global tourism market, especially over destinations such as Brazil, Kenya, Australia and Thailand.Another South African advantage is that the majority of vineyards are concentrated in the Western Cape, making travelling easier for tourists.With an organised wine tourism sector, more jobs will be created in an industry that already employs as much as 275 000 workers.Wine tourism’s long road to approvalThough wine tourism has been part of South Africa’s tourism setup since 1971, when the Stellenbosch wine route was launched, it has never received the marketing treatment that Vindaba promises.Morgenthal has spent nine of his 10 years in the wine industry trying to persuade relevant parties to believe in the value of wine tourism. “I was bashing my head and knocking on doors to officialise wine tourism.”He believes a lack of resources delayed its recognition as a worthwhile investment. He added that the industry had to mature over time before its intrinsic and financial value became evident.The phenomenon of wine tourismThe global growth of wine tourism can be attributed to the influence of the media, said Morgenthal, who believes genres such as the internet and television have played massive roles in shaping the public’s perception of wine in the last five years.He said people have become so interested in lifestyle and cooking shows that entire television networks are now dedicated to such shows. Thanks to these networks and the internet, the lifestyle attached to food and wine has become easily accessible.People, said Morgenthal, are willing to spend money on trips to vineyards that produce their favourite wines.“They want to get closer to the real thing, for the experience beyond the bottle. They want to be part of the process. When they are there, the wine tastes better.”Additionally, a trip to a vineyard educates enthusiasts who want to know more about wine.Morgenthal said some vineyards are finding creative ways to lure consumers by offering mountain bike rides, horse rides and even jungle gyms for children, therefore compelling the consumer to extend their visit.last_img read more

Yes, it is rocket science

first_imgSeen here during a class at Harvard,Siyabulela Xuza is one of the new younggeneration of Africans who are committedto developing the continent’s potential.(Image: Harvard School of Engineeringand Applied Sciences)MEDIA CONTACTS • Priscilla MoodleyNational Science Fair Director+27 11 894 1365 or +27 82 655 3605RELATED ARTICLES• Synthetic biology honour for students• SA pupils win World Literary Quiz• Fostering SA’s young scientists• SA women lead the way in science• Denel helps maths, science pupilsMediaClubSouthAfrica.com reporterEngineering whizzkid Siyabulela Lethuxolo Xuza is a young man with a big future.From the early days of experimenting with science in his mother’s kitchen in the poor community of Mthatha in the Eastern Cape, to international science and engineering accolades, he is now a role model for South Africa’s aspiring scientists.These days the darling of Nasa, who were so taken with him that they gave him a personal guided tour of their facilities, is the youngest member of the Africa 2.0 energy advisory panel.The pan-African organisation comprises the continent’s brightest minds and is committed to seeking sustainable solutions to challenges faced by Africans.In a March 2012 interview with US television network CBS, Xuza said that his current work is focusing on transforming homes into power plants “that capture the energy of the sun during the day and store some of it in fuel cells, for use at night”.Starting youngIn his own words, Xusa described the moment that sparked his lifelong passion for science.“I was chasing the roar of a Cessna plane dropping election pamphlets over Mthatha, my South African township,” he wrote on the America.gov website.“It was 1994, the first year of a new democracy in my country, and the sight of that technological marvel ignited in me a curiosity for science and a passion for using technology to engineer an African renaissance.”He was just five years old at the time. The youngster was also later inspired by South African entrepreneur Mark Shuttleworth’s trip into space in 2002, an event that was largely responsible for his long-standing interest in rocketry.His mother’s kitchen soon became the scene for much experimentation with formulations of jet and rocket fuel, but the informal laboratory had to be moved to the garage after a sticky incident with a too-hot stove.Xuza wasn’t deterred, and over the next few years he continued to work on the project, which culminated in the successful launch of a real home-built rocket, the Phoenix. This vehicle achieved a final height of over a kilometre and earned him the junior South African amateur high-powered altitude record.The rocket was propelled by Xuza’s own invention, a cheaper, safer type of rocket fuel, which became the subject of a project titled African Space: Fuelling Africa’s quest to space. It won a gold medal in the 2006 Eskom National Science Expo as well as a trip to the Nobel Prize ceremony in Sweden, where he presented his work to the Swedish king and queen.The same project took him to the 58th Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in Albuquerque, New Mexico, as part of Team South Africa.Here the project was entered in the energy and transport category and won the 18-year-old, then a matric pupil on a scholarship at St John’s College in Johannesburg, a Best of Category award and a First award.Xuza also received the honour of having a celestial body named after him by the MIT Lincoln Laboratory, which is replacing the complicated scientific names of thousands of minor planets with more accessible names in honour of the world’s top achievers.The minor planet 23182 Siyaxuza circles the solar system in the main asteroid belt near Jupiter and takes 4.01 years to complete a single orbit. It was discovered in July 2000.Xuza has garnered numerous other accolades, including a fellowship in 2010 of the African Leadership Network, and in 2011 he was made a fellow of the international student-run Kairos Society. Membership to this global body is by invitation only.A bright futureMatriculating in 2007 with a string of As, it was almost guaranteed that Xuza would take up further studies at a prestigious institution – that turned out to be Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, where he became one of just 1 948 students accepted out of about 28 000 who applied.He started his engineering degree in September 2008, but wasn’t afraid to take up academic challenges such as debating, the Mandarin language, and world music. These interests, he said, would broaden his mind.The young man from the Eastern Cape also joined the Harvard Forum for International Leadership, a society that brings together students from all around the world to discuss global issues such as HIV/Aids, terrorism and the development of emerging economies, as well as the need for efficient energy solutions.“I may not be able to predict what the future holds,” he wrote on www.america.gov, “but I am excited at how my engineering education will enable me to achieve my aspirations for Africa.”last_img read more

Are robotic milkers failing to live up to promises?

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Leisa Boley Hellwarth, a dairy farmer and attorney near CelinaIn a likely attempt to reach every dairy farmer in the U.S. who purchased robotic milkers, plaintiffs lawyers have been mailing information to every dairy farmer in the nation. The first post card arrived at my house several months ago from usfarmlaw.com, the website for Cullenberg & Tensen, a New Hampshire law firm. Attorney Arend Tensen looks more like the beef farmer he also is in his website pictures. There is more farm equipment pictured on his website than legal resources. Obviously, Tensen’s perceived strength is his agricultural background and current investments.The card that arrived last week came from Steuve. Siegel. Hanson, LLP, trial lawyers and no one in their website wears anything but power clothes, and I do not mean winter weight Carharts or hunting gear camo. This was one of the firms front and center in the Syngenta class action, so they are used to slaying Goliath, even if they look a little Goliathy to me. In fact, Attorney Patrick Steuve, who is handling the robotic milking litigation for the firm, wears a bow tie in his photo and there are 22 attorneys separately profiled in their attorney section of the website.A quick Google search (roboticmilkingfailue.com) determined that Tensen and Steuve are working together representing a class action against DeLaval. The lawsuit alleges that the voluntary milking system robots were defective and failed to perform as represented. Specifically, the systems did not achieve “true quarter milking” as promised, dairy farmers were not permitted to upgrade their VMS robots, and the system did not come equipped with mastitis detection and an online cell counter. The lawsuit further claims that the plaintiffs lawyers have already obtained evidence from former DeLaval sales agents, attached to the lawsuit that the robots were defective, and that its marketing was misleading or fraudulent.Of course, there are at least two sides to every story. I suspect that DeLaval denies the allegations and has a whole other explanation for the situation. Given that robots have been used successfully in Europe for years, there are likely to be denials and counterclaims. Tense and Steuve are also investigating potential cases against Lyle and Galaxy, related to the robotic milking systems they sold in the U.S. that had operational problems or failed to perform as advertised.Why a class action? So long as there are at least forty plaintiffs injured by the defendant in the same way, a class action aggregates many claims into one lawsuit, thereby lowering the cost of litigation. And, unlike the rest of civil litigation in this country, if a class action plaintiff prevails, the attorney fees are paid by the defendant. Keep in mind, however, that a class action binds all group members, unless a plaintiff formally opts out of the group.I always advise clients you do not go to court to make money. In this instance, should the plaintiffs prevail, they will be awarded damages to make them whole. And I have no idea how you calculate the cost of a defective robotic system in the middle of one of the worst dairy economies in history. This litigation is new, though, and anything is possible.last_img read more