Do you see the bed bug hidden in this image? You will have to press play to see it in motion

first_imgImage: iStock While many people use camouflage simply to go fashion, many other living beings use this ability to survive in a world full of predators. Change color, cover yourself with sand or blend in with the surroundings, the art of camouflage has no limits, and there are already many videos and images that show it to us. Although at first glance it seems easy to identify it, it is not at allThe insect in question is called the stink bugcenter_img A great example of this can be seen in the video uploaded by photographer David Weiller. In the following recording you can see the bark of an Amazon tree located in the Colombian municipality of Leticia, however, this is not the only thing hidden in that scene. Although nothing is appreciated at first, it only takes a few seconds to discover that a small insect is hidden in the foreground. (embed) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7pGVW_xHn7A (/ embed) Youtube Video The insect in question is a stink bug. This little bug, receives this name because when it is in situations of high stress can emulsify a very unpleasant odor liquid composed of different elements, among which is cyanide.Currently, this insect is considered a threat to agriculture, since on the one hand, it reproduces very quickly, increasing the level of damage it causes to all types of crops, and on the other, it is resistant to most pesticides They are currently in the market.last_img read more

During the event our SJS Girl Scouts held their f

first_imgDuring the event, our SJS Girl Scouts held their first cookie booth sale of the year. The girls did a fantastic job and sold many, many boxes of cookies! Thank you to everyone who laced up their skates and came out for our ice skating event, and thank you to everyone who either purchased cookies for their own enjoyment or purchased cookies for donation to our troops!Visit our Facebook page to view all of the photos from the fun night.*Advertisement* St. John School enjoyed an evening of ice skating at our fourth annual family skate night at Steriti Rink last Friday. St. John School Fourth Annual Family Skate Nightcenter_img 1 of 14last_img

New AASM guideline recommends use of actigraphy for sleep disorders

first_imgJul 17 2018Actigraphy can be a useful clinical tool for the evaluation of adult and pediatric patients with suspected sleep disorders, including circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders, according to a clinical practice guideline from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM).The guideline, which is published in the July 15 issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, provides recommendations for the use of actigraphy in adult and pediatric patients with suspected or diagnosed sleep disorders or circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders. It includes seven conditional recommendations describing clinical scenarios in which clinicians can use actigraphy to help them understand a patient’s sleep habits across multiple nights. Additionally, one strong recommendation indicates that clinicians should not use actigraphy in place of electromyography for the diagnosis of periodic limb movement disorder.”Actigraphy is a clinical tool that has an important role in the assessment of certain sleep disorders, especially chronic insomnia and circadian-rhythm sleep-wake disorders,” said lead author Michael T. Smith, MA, PhD, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore. “Actigraphic devices are easy for children and adults to use at home, allowing clinicians to gather objective data across multiple nights to gain a better understanding of a patient’s typical sleep timing and duration.”Related StoriesMore than 936 million people have sleep apnea, ResMed-led analysis revealsSleep decline in one’s 50s, 60s increases risk of Alzheimer’s diseaseSleep disorders in patients with low back pain linked to increased healthcare visits, costsActigraphic devices typically are worn on the wrist or ankle for sleep assessment, and they use an accelerometer to record and integrate the occurrence and degree of limb movement activity over time. Mathematical algorithms are then applied to these data to estimate wakefulness and sleep. Potential benefits of actigraphy include its convenience, relatively low patient burden, longitudinal assessment capability, and relatively low cost.Developed by an expert task force and approved by the AASM board of directors, the guideline updated previously published practice parameters and was based on a systematic literature review, meta-analyses, and assessment of the evidence using the GRADE methodology. A draft of the guideline was previously made available for public comment.The systematic review focused exclusively on clinical grade devices approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. It did not cover consumer wearable devices, mobile apps, or other non-prescription devices directly marketed to consumers, which were the subject of a recently published AASM position statement on consumer sleep technology.”Actigraphy provides useful objective metrics across a variety of sleep-wake disorders in the setting of a comprehensive sleep evaluation at an accredited sleep center,” said AASM President Dr. Douglas Kirsch. “However, it is important to recognize that actigraphy is not a substitute for polysomnography when clinical circumstances require a more detailed evaluation of sleep.”Source: https://aasm.org/actigraphy-guideline-release/last_img read more