The Vermont Interpreter Referral Service Marks 10 Year Anniversary

first_imgThe Vermont Interpreter Referral Service (VIRS) iscelebrating ten years of providing interpreting services for Vermonters.The Vermont Interpreter Referral Service was founded October 1,1992. Ithas grown steadily as awareness of the Service, its effectiveness, and theimplications of the landmark federal legislation, Americans withDisabilities Act (ADA), also enacted in 1992, have grown.VIRS provides state-wide interpreter and CART referral services forAmerican Sign Language (ASL)/English interpreting assignments in settingssuch as governmental, mental health, medical, legal, employment,educational, civil and recreational. VIRS serves all Vermonters, bothhearing and deaf, in need of securing a sign language interpreter.VIRS also provides advocacy for deaf clients, training opportunities forinterpreters and serves as an informational resource throughout the state.Initially established with funding from the Vermont Division of VocationalRehabilitation as a pilot project, the Service is currently funded with agrant from the Department of Aging and Disabilities and with fundsgenerated from finder¹s fees.Rene¹ Pellerin, Coordinator of Services for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing,says, “Without question, VIRS enables a far more efficient and effectivesystem of locating interpreters for assignments throughout the state ofVermont. Without them, it would be a time consuming task for individualagencies and businesses to obtain interpreting services.”In honor of the tenth anniversary, and marking yet another leap forward inthe evolution of communications access within the state, VIRS is pleased to announce the official launch of a new comprehensive website,at: www.virs.org(link is external), providing information online for businesses,organizations, interpreters, deaf and hard of hearing people as well asinteractive options for requesting interpreters.A special anniversary event, open to the public, is scheduled for May 3,2003 at the Vermont Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, 60 AustineDrive, Brattleboro. Additional details will be announced closer to thedate.last_img read more

Fridays on the Fly: The Last Best Man

first_imgMost anglers can trace the earliest days of their fly fishing journey back to one single outing, and often times that outing was made possible by none other than dear old Dad. Dads tend to be the primary reason why most fishermen and women take a liking to and ultimately develop a passion for the sport of fishing. But that’s not always the case.This time last year, the outdoor brand YETI, turned this assumption on its head with a moving video series titled “My Old Man”. The series follows several prominent outdoorsmen and women, and highlights the role—or lack thereof— that their respective fathers played in bringing the joy of the outdoors into their lives, as well the way in which they choose to share the power of the outdoors with their own children.One of the videos profiles Hilary Hutcheson, who I interviewed for an article on women in fly fishing just last year. Hutcheson, who grew up in Glacier, Montana where her father worked as a ranger for the National Park Service, had a unique story to tell.Though her father’s family lineage was heavily steeped in fly fishing culture and tradition, he himself had never taken it up as a passion, instead opting for the thrills of mountain climbing and other pursuits more closely associated with his high stakes job as a search and rescue ranger for NPS. The video below, titled “The Last Best Man”, follows Hilary and her father Dave as they embark on his very first fly fishing adventure on home waters in stunning Northwest Montana.It’s a touching short video that shows a rare role reversal where a fishing obsessed daughter gets to teach the art of fly fishing to her novice father, instead of the other way around. It gets particularly exciting when Dave hooks his first trout the fly somewhere around the five minute mark.To check out the rest of the videos in the YETI “My Old Man” series, including a great short film on the fishing guide son of legendary songwriter Townes Van Zandt, J.T. Van Zandt and a video profiling big wave surfer and avid hunter Shane Dorian, click here.last_img read more

Ex-GDF officer jailed for 22 years

first_imgMurder accused: Marc AngoyMarc Angoy of Buzz Bee Dam, Craig, East Bank Demerara (EBD), was sentenced to 22 years’ imprisonment by Justice Navindra Singh after pleading to a lesser count of manslaughter.The 44-year-old was accused of killing 13-month-old Arianne Gill and feloniously wounding the child’s aunt, Ashley Wellington, on October 18, 2015, at Eastville Housing Scheme, East Coast Demerara (ECD).After his plea, he was sentenced to 14 years for the murder and another eight for the felonious wounding. The sentences will run concurrently.Angoy was represented by Attorney-at-Law Mark Conway while the State was represented by Prosecutors Tuanna Hardy, Abigail Gibbs and Teriq Mohammed.The shooting reportedly stemmed from a restraining order that was taken out against him by his former lover, Shelly Norton, after being a victim of physical abuse.It was reported that the former Guyana Defence Force member was previously charged, but later acquitted, for the murder of a man in 1998 at Twelve and a Half Miles Issano, Mazaruni, Region Seven.However, during his confession, Angoy reportedly told detectives that he was angry that the woman had filed the restraining order although he gave her everything she wanted to live a comfortable life.On the day in question, he reportedly went to Norton’s Annandale, ECD home with the intention of killing her. Armed with a gun and peering through a window, the suspect reportedly fired into the house.The bullets struck and killed 13-month-old Arianne Gill and wounded her 12-year-old aunt, Ashley Wellington.Dead: Arianne Gilllast_img read more