Public Service Board approves 30-megawatt wind power project

first_imgThe Vermont Public Service Board on Thursday approved one of the largest wind power generating facilities in Vermont. The PSB issued a certificate of public good to Deerfield Wind LLC authorizing it to construct and operate a 15-turbine, 30-megawatt wind generation facility, and associated transmission and interconnection facilities, on approximately 80 acres in the Green Mountain National Forest, located in Searsburg and Readsboro. Seven turbines are to be placed on the east side of Route 8 on the same ridgeline as the existing Green Mountain Power Searsburg wind facility and eight turbines built along the ridgeline to the west of Route 8 in the northwesterly orientation.GMP’s Searsburg site is still the only commercially operating wind farm in Vermont. The eleven, 550-kilowatt wind turbines (6-megawatt) can provide enough electricity to supply 1,600 average Vermont households. It went online in July 1997.The new Searsburg project is the second large-scale wind project approved in the last two years. Vermont Wind LLC, a subsidiary of First Wind from Newton, MA, was granted a Certificate of Public Good by the Public Service Board in 2007 for a 40-megawatt project in Sheffield.The official order from the PSB is attached. AttachmentSize Wind Farm.pdf57.2 KBlast_img read more

Jakarta seeks to protect poor as COVID-19 outbreak leaves many homeless

first_imgThe Jakarta administration has set up a number of homeless shelters across the city as the economic slowdown caused by the COVID-19 outbreak forces some hard-hit residents to live on the sidewalk as they are no longer able to afford to pay their rent.A recent KompasTV report showed dozens of Jakartans, some of whom were small traders, resting on the sidewalks in the Tanah Abang area of Central Jakarta at nightfall, awaiting aid from volunteers who usually come during the fasting month.“I had a small stall in Kota Tua [in West Jakarta]. Because of the coronavirus outbreak, I lost my customers and the government’s regulations prohibited me from opening my place. Meanwhile, we must eat and pay for housing,” Reza, one of the homeless people, said in an interview. The Jakarta administration has said that it plans to turn all city-owned sports halls (GOR) across the capital into temporary homeless shelters for those who have lost their jobs and homes because of the pandemic.“The important thing is that no one is abandoned,” Governor Anies Baswedan said recently, adding that the sports halls would also be equipped with public kitchens.[RA::Hunger hits as many Indonesians struggle during COVID-19 pandemichttps://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2020/04/21/hunger-hits-as-many-indonesians-struggle-during-covid-19-pandemic.html]The Jakarta Public Order Agency (Satpol PP) relocated 92 homeless people, who were found on the streets in Central Jakarta and South Jakarta on Friday and Saturday, to the Karet Tengsin GOR in Tanah Abang. Central Jakarta Social Agency head Ngapuli Peranginangin said, however, that the majority of those relocated had relatives in the areas surrounding Jakarta who picked them up shortly after relocation.“We conducted an assessment so that the homeless people’s backgrounds were clear. We have given them and their family a statement of warning to prevent them from returning to the streets,” Ngapuli told The Jakarta Post on Monday.He said there were nine people left in the GOR, who had no relatives living nearby and who could not go back to their hometowns in Papua and Riau due to the government’s mudik (exodus) ban.“Our targets are the victims of the pandemic, including those who suffer because of policies like the mudik ban, or medical workers kicked out of their rooming houses. But we haven’t found that many of them,” Ngapuli said. (syk)Topics :last_img read more