Public Service Board approves 30-megawatt wind power project

first_imgThe Vermont Public Service Board on Thursday approved one of the largest wind power generating facilities in Vermont. The PSB issued a certificate of public good to Deerfield Wind LLC authorizing it to construct and operate a 15-turbine, 30-megawatt wind generation facility, and associated transmission and interconnection facilities, on approximately 80 acres in the Green Mountain National Forest, located in Searsburg and Readsboro. Seven turbines are to be placed on the east side of Route 8 on the same ridgeline as the existing Green Mountain Power Searsburg wind facility and eight turbines built along the ridgeline to the west of Route 8 in the northwesterly orientation.GMP’s Searsburg site is still the only commercially operating wind farm in Vermont. The eleven, 550-kilowatt wind turbines (6-megawatt) can provide enough electricity to supply 1,600 average Vermont households. It went online in July 1997.The new Searsburg project is the second large-scale wind project approved in the last two years. Vermont Wind LLC, a subsidiary of First Wind from Newton, MA, was granted a Certificate of Public Good by the Public Service Board in 2007 for a 40-megawatt project in Sheffield.The official order from the PSB is attached. AttachmentSize Wind Farm.pdf57.2 KBlast_img read more

Betting on Sports Europe to address industry’s looming crisis

first_img Related Articles Share Submit SBC announces digital future for Europe, America, CIS & Africa July 30, 2020 Björn Nilsson: How Triggy is delivering digestible data through pre-set triggers August 28, 2020 StumbleUpon Share Christopher Metcalf, Leon House: Social barriers must be broken on gambling treatment June 25, 2020 What can the sports betting industry do to avert an industry-wide crisis across Europe will be a key theme at this year’s Betting on Sports Europe conference, being held at Stamford Bridge on 2-4 June. The conference will take place against a backdrop of the sports betting industry coming under fire from both politicians and the media, with the criticism causing severe reputational damage and helping to bring about a climate in which more stringent regulation grows ever more likely.While coping with this onslaught it also has to tackle sporting integrity breaches, urgent player protection issues, such as improving help for problem gamblers and stricter management of VIP programmes, and serious operational problems, including how to succeed within new advertising restrictions and finding banks prepared to work with gambling businesses.There is also a real need for operators to share best practice, develop solutions that help both the industry and its customers, and to speak with a unified voice when responding to plans to amend legislation.Betting on Sports Europe is the ideal forum for the regulated industry to come together as a community and work towards creating a sustainable, customer-focused model for a sector that employs huge numbers of people and generates hundreds of millions in tax revenues across the continent.  With tracks dedicated to lotteries, esports, sports integrity, industry leadership, horse racing, football, payments & compliance and responsible marketing, the conference addresses many of the crucial challenges the betting industry faces, as well as a CEO panel examining how operators can work together to drive improvements. Andrew McCarron, Managing Director of event organiser SBC, said: “The European sports betting industry is faced with a perfect storm of intense government scrutiny, sustained media criticism and rising levels of competition, while some self-inflicted wounds have exacerbated the situation.“And over the past few years the industry has not been very effective at standing up for itself and responding to the barrage of negative publicity, or at sharing the best practice that many operators have developed individually in response to past errors.“Betting on Sports Europe will help to change that, providing a forum for operators to discuss the major threats to the future of sports betting, to share their solutions, and to strengthen relationships across the industry in preparation for the likely regulatory challenges ahead.”Taking place at Chelsea FC’s Stamford Bridge stadium on 2-4 June 2020, Betting on Sports Europe features ten full-day content tracks with insights from more than 200 expert speakers from across the European sports betting industry.Delegates can also look forward to an exhibition showcasing the latest innovations from 30 leading suppliers and some of SBC’s renowned evening networking events, all of which are included with your pass.last_img read more

Spacecraft hints at source of Jupiters mysterious auroras

first_imgSpacecraft hints at source of Jupiter’s mysterious auroras Jupiter’s auroras (depicted in this composite image) are by far the strongest in the solar system—and surprisingly, a new study finds, the brightest ones are not generated by the same processes that create our planet’s strongest auroras. On Earth, the brightest auroras (the high-altitude glows often called the northern and southern lights) are generated when electrons in outer space near Earth are accelerated by large electrical potentials, or voltages, along the lines in our planet’s magnetic field and slam into gas molecules in the upper atmosphere above polar regions. The same process, driven by even larger voltages, happens at Jupiter but plays an unexpectedly minor role in creating auroras there, the new analysis suggests. Scientists don’t fully understand what’s driving Jupiter’s strongest auroras, but data gathered by the orbiting Juno spacecraft hint that the electrons generating Jupiter’s polar glows may be accelerated by turbulent waves in the planet’s magnetic field—a process somewhat akin to surfers being driven shoreward ahead of breaking ocean waves, the researchers report today in Nature. Further analyses may help scientists better understand what’s going on in Jupiter’s atmosphere, scientists say. They could also help engineers better design probes that can survive repeated passes through the strong magnetic fields near Jupiter. By Sid PerkinsSep. 6, 2017 , 1:00 PMlast_img read more