SBW opens up about a return to league

first_imgWilliams is targeting next year’s Rugby Union World Cup with the All Blacks but his future beyond that is undecided.The dual international turns 34 next August and is weighing up ending an illustrious career spanning Australia, New Zealand, France, Japan, rugby league, rugby union and boxing.Williams became a pariah in the 13-man game after his walk-out on Canterbury in 2008 over a contract dispute.He returned to play a leading role in the Sydney Roosters’ 2013 NRL premiership victory, only to again return to union, where he won the 2015 World Cup and appeared in the 2016 Olympics.He’s eyeing his third World Cup next year but refuses to rule out a third stint in rugby league in 2020 and says opportunities to work with the Pacific community and in coaching will affect his decision.”I’m 34 next year. I’m just happy doing what I love doing,” Williams told Fox Sports.”I really want to affect my Pasifika people. With that comes responsibility.”I need more knowledge in that field, which I’m doing – I’m doing for my coaching papers.”God willing I make it through next year and I make that World Cup side.”Then after that, I have to keep the wife happy and then if I do play on, it’ll have to be at a place where I can still have a voice.”Williams returned to the Roosters for two years in 2013-14 after a handshake agreement with Roosters chairman Nick Politis, which was struck following his first exit from the NRL.In the past few years, there have been rumours Williams will end his career with the Tri-Colours.He refused to give anything away about his future on Sunday but said he regretted the way he turned his back on the Bulldogs, the club that gave him a start as a teenager.”I still stand by my decision to leave. Though as a young fella you’re a bit rash and you do things you probably regret,” Williams said.”I’m no different. I’m human, I make mistakes.”When it came to that decision to leave, although things weren’t going the right way off the field, I just felt like I was backed into a corner and that was all I could do.”Looking back now, if I was a lot more confident in myself as a man, I probably could have gone and spoken to the administration and told them, ‘Look, I’m going to leave if you don’t do what you guys promised me’.”last_img read more

Liverpool’s Jurgen Klopp apologises to West Brom boss after Anfield fallout

first_imgLiverpool boss Jurgen Klopp offered an apology to West Brom manager Tony Pulis for his behaviour during and after last weekend’s heated encounter.The pair interacted with each other on a number of occasions during the feisty 2-2 Premier League draw at Anfield and Klopp did not exchange the customary handshake with his opposite number.Speaking immediately after the match, Klopp said he had not shaken hands because “it was not a friendly game” and also criticised West Brom’s style of play.Pulis clearly was still stewing over the incident when he spoke to the media on Friday and argued Klopp’s criticism was to deflect attention from the Reds’ failings.Klopp learned of Pulis’ comments just before his press conference ahead of Sunday’s clash with Watford but chose to extend an olive branch.The German insisted he had simply forgotten to shake hands in the heat of the moment as he went to his players to celebrate their late equaliser and thank the fans.Klopp said: “I can easily say sorry for everything I said during the game because I am very emotional, I think Tony Pulis is similar, and there were a few words.“We were very close together.“For me it was not a big problem but it was very intense and after the game I wanted to go to my team.“Really I forgot to shake hands. That’s all.“If we meet today, it would be no problem to say sorry and to shake hands, to have a talk about whatever.“I have big respect for his work, no doubt about this.“In that situation it was not easy to switch on the lamps and switch them off.”On his comments after the match, Klopp added: “It was not a game where five minutes were enough to come back to a normal situation.”The 48-year-old, though, denied the relationship with other managers is more heated in the Premier League than the Bundesliga.“Only the coaching zones are closer, that’s the only difference,” he said.“We are all emotional and best friends in the league.“We talk completely normal before the game, we ask about our families after the game and during the game.“We are coaches of different teams and we say things you never would usually.“That’s how it is on the pitch. But it was not that serious.”last_img read more