CDC says new virus spreading beyond travelers

first_imgApr 28, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – As the official count of US swine influenza cases rose to 64 today, top federal health officials said it’s becoming increasingly clear that the virus is spreading beyond people who recently traveled to Mexico, the epicenter of the outbreak.”The information we’re seeing from states and locals . . . is that this appears to be acting like a normal flu virus, which has a fairly high rate of transmission in families,” Dr. Richard Besser, acting director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), said at a news briefing this afternoon. He said investigators are finding respiratory and flu-like illnesses in family members of case-patients.Besser said the only confirmed case of person-to-person transmission in the United States so far is in the two Kansas cases, which officials have said involved a husband and wife. But he said that probably only reflects the limited extent of testing, adding, “I expect we are seeing transmission within families.”Later he commented that while travel history is an important diagnostic clue in people who have a flu-like illness, “I wouldn’t limit it to that, because it’s really [in] a minority of cases to date that we’ve identified that travel history.”The signs of ongoing transmission seem to fit with the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) move yesterday to raise the pandemic alert level to phase 4, which means a new flu virus can spread efficiently enough to cause sustained community outbreaks.This morning the CDC raised its case count to 64, from 40 as of yesterday, including 45 cases in New York, 10 in California, 6 in Texas, 2 in Kansas, and 1 in Ohio. Besser said five patients have been hospitalized—three in California and two in New York—but provided no details on their illnesses.The Associated Press reported this afternoon that “several hundred” students who attend a New York City Catholic school that has been hit by swine flu are sick.Besser reported that the latest illness onset date in a confirmed swine flu case is Apr 24, but that doesn’t mean there has been no transmission since then.”We’re asking that if you are a confirmed case not only that you stay home, but that the rest of your family stay home as well,” to limit the virus’s spread, he said.States all want suppliesIn other comments, Besser reported that all states have now requested their shares of antiviral drugs and personal protective equipment from the Strategic National Stockpile, and the CDC is working to fulfill the requests. He called the requests “a forward-leaning step,” since most states don’t have any cases yet.In response to a question, he said the CDC has not yet identified anything that distinguishes swine flu from seasonal flu, aside from the possible clue of a travel history. He said it was an advantage that the new virus did not emerge in the middle of the regular flu season.”If this outbreak had occurred in January or February it would’ve been very difficult to detect because of all the flu activity going on,” he said.On vaccine issues, Besser called the possibility of adding a swine flu antigen to the seasonal flu vaccine “an attractive approach” in that one vaccine could protect against seasonal and swine flu infections. “We do know that seasonal flu vaccine production is moving forward, and we don’t want to delay that, but that is under consideration,” he added.The other possibility is to make a monovalent vaccine, containing just the swine flu strain, he noted.The CDC previously said it was developing a seed strain of swine flu virus for companies to use in making a vaccine. Besser said the seed strain has not yet been sent to the manufacturers.He also reported that the incubation period in US swine flu cases appears to range from 2 to 7 days, which he termed typical for flu.Earlier in the day, Dr. Keiji Fukuda of the WHO emphasized—as he did yesterday—that the swine flu represents “a serious situation” but that a pandemic is not yet inevitable. “We really are in a period in which countries should take this opportunity to really prepare themselves for the possibility of a pandemic,” especially countries not yet dealing with cases, he said.He said that as of today the WHO officially counted 79 cases, including 40 in the United States (the number reported yesterday), 26 in Mexico, 6 in Canada, 3 in New Zealand, 2 in Spain, and 2 in the United Kingdom.Later today, the WHO in an online statement reported that Israel has confirmed 2 cases. The numbers are confirmed cases reported by governments.Fukuda, the WHO’s assistant director-general for health security and the environment, stressed how much remains unknown about the new virus, including where it originated and why severe cases seem to be confined to Mexico.”We still do not have a good explanation for why the pattern of cases in other countries appears relatively mild while the pattern in Mexico appears to be much more severe,” he said. Besser said much the same in the CDC briefing.When asked about reports that the virus might have originated in Mexico’s Vera Cruz state, Fukuda said, “I think right now it’s not possible to really know where this virus originated.” He added that the swine flu isolates that have been analyzed have been very similar, suggesting that the virus emerged recently and has not been around long enough to branch into many variants.Fukuda cautioned that even if swine flu activity subsides sometime soon, it will be at least several months before experts can conclude that a pandemic won’t happen. “It’s very hard to know when something like this disappears. I don’t think we’ll be able to conclude that in the next few weeks.”He also warned not to forget how the great pandemic of 1918-19 unfolded. “It also started out as a relatively mild spread of illness that really wasn’t much noted in most places, but then it became a very severe pandemic in the fall,” he said.See also: CDC swine flu pagehttp://www.cdc.gov/swineflu/Apr 28 WHO updatehttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2009_04_28/en/index.htmlWHO swine flu pagehttp://www.who.int/csr/disease/swineflu/en/index.htmllast_img read more

Jim Riggleman

first_imgShould the Reds hire Jim Riggleman as their permanent manager?  I would say “yes”.  I like his traditional way of managing.  I am sure he has all of those statistics that are now available to all baseball teams, but his on-field moves go back to the way baseball used to be played.  He tries to bunt, although none of his players seem to know how to do it.What Riggleman needs in order to succeed is better talent.  Unfortunately, the Reds budget is tied up with Homer Bailey and Joey Votto.  Votto is still earning his keep, but Bailey is not.  If they want to keep Gennett, it will take more money as well.  He certainly deserves it.  What they desperately need are starting pitchers.  Of all the prospects they traded for or those developed in their system, only Castillo is doing a major league job.I would bet that Riggleman will be let go because it is easier and cheaper to replace him then to find the good players they need.  Riggleman is not making a lot of money which might work in his favor.  We will see.last_img read more

Pirate Track At Taylor University

first_imgA small group of Greensburg Track and Field members traveled to Upland Friday evening to compete in the Taylor HSR Qualifying meet. The evening started with Brenner Hanna winning the 3200m with a new Indoor Personal Record time of 11:38.99 which also sets a new Indoor School Record.Hanna also competed with teammates Emily Mangels, Sophie Nobbe, and Emma Wilmer in the 3200m Relay placing 3rd in 11:18.72.The Boys 3200m and Distance Medley Relay teams of Sawyer Sanders, Jonathon Ralston, Andrew Johnson and Hunter Butz also competed at Taylor University Friday night. The 4 x 800 team placed 5th in 9:24.47 and the DMR placed 7th in 12:57.31. Long Jumper Daimon Austin also competed and earned 8th place with a 19’8.75 leap.Based on current state standings the Pirates Track and Field Teams will have multiple competitors in the Hoosier State Relays, often referred to as the Indoor State Meet, next Saturday at Indiana University. Individually Lily Grimes punched her ticket to Indoor State earlier this month and will be competing in shot put while Brenner Hanna has qualified in the 3200m race. The Girls 3200m Relay team and the Girls DMR team including Hanna as well as Emily Mangels, Emma Hatton, Emma Wilmer, and Sophie Nobbe will also be racing at the Indoor State Meet. From the boys team Daimon Austin qualified with his 20’2″ leap at Wabash last weekend and will be competing in long jump at HSR at IU. Other Pirate individual athletes and relay teams may have a chance to participate in HSR too if other competitors from across the state choose to scratch out of an event.Courtesy of Pirates Coach Katina Tekulve.last_img read more

Casillas: “I’m sure we’ll feel at home in Morocco”

first_imgIker Casillas has underlined Real Madrid’s eagerness to extend their historic winning streak in Morocco: “We’re raring to win the Club World Cup and to keep up the level of form we’ve shown all season so as to capture this trophy in a fitting manner”, the goalkeeper told FIFA.com.The ‘Los Blancos’ squad touched down in Rabat on Sunday and were able to experience for themselves the stormy conditions that have forced their game against Cruz Azul to be moved to Marrakech.”We arrived in Rabat and the weather was very different to what it was like in Madrid, but I’m sure there will be lots of fans supporting us and we’ll feel at home”, Casillas added.last_img

Lunch Break Looks to Expand RB Facilities

first_imgRED BANK – Lunch Break is looking to expand.The soup kitchen and food panty, which has been providing food, clothing and the wherewithal for those in need in Red Bank and the surrounding area for nearly 30 years, is seeking borough approval to expand its facility. The organization is looking to build an addition on adjacent properties because of what its executive director said is an increasing need for its services.“We’ve definitely outgrown the space,” said Gwendolyn Love, “even for what we’re doing now.”Love sat at a table in the 121 Drs. James Parker Blvd. facility during lunchtime on Aug. 30 as volunteers and employees worked and moved briskly, serving lunch to the crowd.As she discussed the need for more space to conduct its various programs, a woman approached the table. Chandelle Morris, who lives on Bank Street, sat down at the table with her tray and its modest lunch, a small piece of cake and fruit juice. Morris said she doesn’t have breakfast or dinner most days, relying on her lunch here as her primary meal. “It’s something I look forward to when I get up in the morning,” she said.She thanked Love for what Lunch Break had to offer and turned and said, “They are saving my life.”Love glanced over with smile and thanked Morris for making her point about the work Lunch Break does and the need for the expansion.“We believe Lunch Break can be an instrument in the community to allow people to make it to the next level,” Love said.In June 2011 Justin and Victoria Gmelich, a Rumson couple, donated to Lunch Break two properties on the boulevard, each with a vacant single-family residential home, according to Love.Lunch Break representatives will appear at the borough Zoning Board of Adjustment on Thursday, Sept. 20, with its application to combine those lots and build an addition to the current site.According to the application on file at the borough’s Planning and Zoning Depart­ment, Lunch Break would demolish the existing homes at 113-115 Drs. James Parker Blvd. and use that 7,320-square-foot tract to expand the current 2,989-square-foot facility and build a 2,091-square-foot addition.The addition’s first floor, Love said, will be used, in part, to house Lunch Break’s clothing distribution program. Currently, it operates the program on Saturdays out of the dining area, where individuals and families can come to select free clothing and small household items they need.If the application is approved, the public will be able to drop off donations and pick up items from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays.Lunch Break could also use the site for its other clothing program, called Suited for Success, where clients can get clothing appropriate for job interviews.Along with those programs, Lunch Break would continue to operate its “Internet café” on site, where clients have access to computers and use the Internet connections, often to help locate work.The remainder of the site would be used for administrative offices, file and supply storage and to provide space for the various social service agencies that regularly appear to assist Lunch Break clients.“The new space will allow us to function more efficiently,“ Love said.The addition will “create a one-stop shopping” site for clients, who often don’t have cars or money for mass transit to visit social services offices, Love said.“Business has been too good,” she acknowledged. The facility has been seeing a growing need for services.“With the economy the way it is, with people looking for help, with new people looking for that help, Lunch Break will help them move to that next level in their life,” Love said. “It’s not a handout, it’s a hand up.” By John Burtonlast_img read more

Sea Bright Residents Can Visit Property Monday, Tuesday; 56 Buildings Deemed…

first_imgBy Michele J. KuhnWEST LONG BRANCH – Sea Bright residents will be permitted to check on their homes and retrieve essential items  – according to a set scheduled – on Monday and Tuesday, Nov. 5-6, and most likely will not be able to move back until they have obtained a Certificate of Occupancy.Residents are also bracing for a nor’ester than is predicted to hit the area Wednesday, bringing with it high winds, and heavy rains.While the damage in Sea Bright has been extreme, there has been no loss of life, Mayor Dina Long said. “Thank you…  for hanging in there … for keeping the faith,” he said before requesting a moment of silence and reciting the Pledge of Allegiance.Long held a meeting Sunday afternoon outside in the stadium at Shore Regional High School to update the resident of the borough that was hard-hit by Hurricane Sandy. Hundreds of residents sat on metal bleachers in the chilly air and listened to Long as she and other officials spoke over a bullhorn.The mayor told residents that all properties in the borough had been assessed for damage and that 56 were deemed to be uninhabitable and no admittance could be gained. Others had been deemed as substantially damaged; still others had from little visible damage to varying degrees of damage.“Every single house in Sea bright sustained some damage,” Councilman C. Read Murphy told the shivering crowd.Each borough property has been inspected and its assessment is listed on the borough’s website at www.seabrightnj.org.“We have moved heaven and earth to get you in to your property,” Long said of the schedule officials mapped out for residents to return briefly to their homes.Those living in the northern end of the borough up to the Rumson Bridge may visit their property from 9 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 5. Those with property south of the bridge may visit from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 6.Residents may bring bags to get essential items to the foot of the Rumson Bridge during those hours. There they will be put on shuttle buses and dropped at their property. They will later be picked up and shuttled back to Rumson. “Please do not bring children. Please do not bring pets,” she said. Long also asked that resident not walk around the borough because conditions are still considered dangerous.While visiting their homes, residents can board their windows with plywood and supplies donated by Builder’s General. Borough employees will be able to help residents with the window boarding.While Long said she believed residents with would not be able to go back to their homes with full access for themselves and their cars until Monday, Nov. 12, Councilman James LoBiondo said he believed it could be this Friday, Nov. 9. Long later said she hoped LoBiondo’s assessment was the correct one. She called the situation in Sea Bright “fluid” with changes occurring on a regular basis.LoBiondo reported to the cheers of the residents that all gas leaks had been contained but service would be shut off to half of the borough for up to a month because of the damage to the system.Sewer pumps that were damaged in town were being replaced this week.Water service has not been interrupted and the system would not be shut down because officials wanted to keep the sprinkler systems in buildings with them operational. However, resident who had burst pipes were told they could shut off water to their homes, if it could be safely done.LoBiondo said the fire department has been going door-to-door to look for noticeable water pipe breaks.Crews from Jersey Central Power & Light (JCP&L) were working Sunday in town, along with power company crews from as far away as Ohio, to restore power. They were initially replacing or straightening utility poles and checking their status. Once that was completed, they would begin repairing or restringing power lines.Six feet of sand was blown onto Sea Bright streets and could be fouling various service lines. Crews were working to check them and were looking to see if storm sewer lines needed to have sand blown out of them to help lessen the impact of any flooding from the anticipated storm this week.Councilman Murphy reported that the seawall had been breached in two placed, near Tradewinds and the old Anchorage beach clubs.Murphy praised the mayor and council and said they all had “boots on the ground since day 1” to assist residents and get the borough back to as near normal as possible. Long also praised council members, borough employees, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Monmouth County for its response to the disaster.A representative of FEMA told the crowd that he worked in Washington. D.C. and had worked on other East Coast hurricane recoveries. “I toured your area a couple of days ago,” he said, “and, to be honest with you, it blew me away.” He urged residents to call FEMA (1-800-621-3362) and get a case number so the agency can assist them.Representatives from FEMA will be available on Tuesday at the Fair Haven Fire Department on River Road — where Sea Bright residents are to cast ballots on Election Day — to help answer questions and assist residents. Phones will be avaiable for those who need to contact loved ones or their insurance companies.Long said Bingham Hall, 40 Bingham Ave, in Rumson was a place where residents could go for warm clothing, a hot meal, hot showers and take care of other needs. Food, water and cleaning supplies will also be available at the VNA office at 141 Bodman Place in Red Bank. The mayor urged residents to keep checking the borough’s website for updates and not to believe rumors that have been swirling about.Rescue workers got a bit of a boost Sunday when world class chefs David Burke of David Burke Fromagerie in Rumson, Chris Wood of Woody’s Ocean Grille in Sea Bright, Pat Trama of Ama Ristorante at Driftwood  and others brought food and equipment to the Sea Bright Firehouse and cooked them a meal.last_img read more

Ridge Road Run Opens the Door to Talking About Suicide

first_img“Irefuse to have what happened to Jack be for nothing,” she said. LITTLESILVER – Dawn Wilcox, an avid runner who has organized her fair share ofraces, said she realized just how different the inaugural Ridge Road Run forSuicide Prevention was going to be last year while helping out at the racepacket pickup the day before the event. Eulner,19, who just wrapped up his freshman year at the University of South Carolina, willagain serve as co-director for the race. He agreed it wasn’t until participantsbegan to arrive to pick up race packets at Road Runner Sports in Shrewsbury theday before the race that he realized the impact the race would have. While heassumed most runners would be local, Eulner said he was surprised by big groupsthat arrived from North Jersey and one man who showed him photos of hisgrandson who had died by suicide and who just looked like a “popular, normalkid who played football,” said Eulner. Thisyear’s race will be held at RBR in Little Silver – a few miles down Ridge Roadfrom last year’s setting in Rumson – Sunday, May 19 and will feature a numberof events, including a 5K, a 1-mile fun run and kiddie dash. Proceeds for thisyear’s race will benefit local organizations, designated by each high school,which Wilcox said helps benefit members of the community. Proceeds from the race will benefit mental health programs at the three organizing high schools and the Mental Health Association of Monmouth County. Forthose wishing to watch the race and cheer on the runners, the course starts infront of RBR and heads down Harding Road to Rumson Road, loops through HanceAvenue and Vista Drive before heading back to the high school on Rumson Roadtoward Harding Road. Organizersare hoping for better weather than last year’s race day, which was cold andrainy with a driving wind. But that didn’t stop all involved from feeling thewarmth of what they were doing. Helooped in students from nearby high schools – and tapped into Wilcox’sexpertise organizing races – to establish the Ridge Road Run, which was held inApril 2018 at RFH. “TheRidge Road Run was more than just a platform for suicide awareness andprevention,” said Lori Jarck, mom to Pierce, a junior at RFH at the time of hisdeath and member of the school’s lacrosse team. “It was a place where we couldremember and honor the lives of our loved ones who died by suicide.” “Wehad family members coming in and showing pictures of loved ones they had lostand telling us why this was so important to them,” said Wilcox, who organizedthe Little Silver 5K for 10 years and continues in her role as one of threedirectors of the Ridge Road Run. “It was so emotional and the energy was justso different compared to other races.” Participantscan form a team or join one of the over 30 teams registered for this year’srace, like #loveyoumorejackmoore, a group running in honor of Jack Moore ofFair Haven, a college sophomore who died by suicide in 2016, or Breaking theBarriers, in memory of Matawan teen Jordan Phillips who died by suicide inApril 2017. Studentsfrom Red Bank Regional (RBR), Rumson Fair Haven (RFH) and Red Bank Catholic(RBC) high schools came together last year to organize the Ridge Road Run aftereach school community was touched by suicide. What they thought would be a wayfor students to put aside rivalries and unite in showing support for thosestruggling with mental health issues and beginning a discussion about suicide,instead grew into a sizable race that attracted almost 1,500 participants andraised over $118,000 for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention andMental Health Association of Monmouth County.  This article originally appeared in the May 9-15 print edition of the The Two River Times. RBR junior Claudia Kelly, 17, Little Silver – who serves as race co-director again this year – said a number of people came up to her last year to say, “You don’t know how much this means to me.” Kelly, like most of the race’s organizers, had been touched by someone who struggled with depression and suicidal ideation and she wanted to do something that would give her peers an opportunity to start talking about it. Shrewsburyresident Michael Eulner was a senior at RBR last year. He was galvanized to dosomething to prevent another student suicide after seeing on social media howRFH students were impacted by the death of their classmate, Pierce Jarck, inOctober 2017. Mooresaid her mission since Jack’s death is to encourage open conversations aboutsuicide and the Ridge Road Run provides a platform to do that in a “verynon-threatening way.” But she thinks kids are more open to those discussions,which is important with all the stress and anxiety teens face and the addedpressures of social media. “We are a little snapshot of what’s going on in theworld today.” “I can’t change the past, but we can try to change the future,” said Phillips, whose son was a freshman at Matawan High School at the time of his death and a member of the school’s marching band. What’smost special about the race, according to Christine Moore – whose son, Jack,died by suicide in 2016 – was that students from three local high schoolsorganized it. “The kids embraced this on their own,” she said. “They didn’t doit because a grown-up told them it would be a good idea.” It’sthe stigma of suicide, Jarck said, that needs to be removed and people need tolearn how to talk about it, even though it can be difficult and uncomfortable. If you or someone you know has thoughts of suicide, there are people who want to help. Reach out to the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 1-800-273-8255 or Text HOME to 741741 to contact a trained crisis counselor. A confidential and anonymous helpline for New Jersey’s youth and young adults called 2nd Floor can be reached at 1-888-222-2228. LuannePhillips, whose son Jordan died by suicide in April 2017, will be at the raceagain this year and said she loved that the kids were the ones who organizedthe event and wanted to start the conversation. “It was reallyone of the most empowering days,” said Moore, Fair Haven, whose son Jack was 19and preparing to start his sophomore year at the University of Richmond when helost his battle with depression and anxiety. Reflecting on race day, she said, “Itwasn’t a sad day. I can’t stress that enough.” Get the 4-1-1 on the Ridge Road Run By Amy Byrnes The 5K race will kick off at 8:30 a.m., followed by a 1-mile fun run at 9:30 a.m. and a kiddie dash at 10 a.m. To sign up for a race, volunteer or make a donation, head to the Ridge Road Run website at ridgeroadrun.org. Describedby participants in last year’s race as “empowering” and “special,” this year’sRidge Road Run for Suicide Prevention is set for Sunday, May 19 at Red BankRegional High School in Little Silver and offers lots of opportunities toparticipate. Hesaid he thought, “This just can’t happen again,” and began talking to RBRadministrators and staff to see what he could organize to help shine a light onsuicide and mental health. As class president, he said he felt like he was in aposition to be able to create awareness throughout the Two River area. “Myson, Pierce, led a full, vibrant, loving and caring life and I hope that hewill be remembered how he lived and not how he died,” said Jarck. “The Ridge Road Run gave us the chance to outwardly and openly honor and remember our beloved Pierce.”last_img read more