FIBA World Cup: D’Tigers arrive Guangzhou to face Côte d’Ivoire

first_imgRelatedPosts Tinubu to Adesina: Re-election, affirmation of Africa’s confidence in your ability Oguchi named D’Tigers player of the decade Pirates attack Chinese vessel off coast of Cote d’Ivoire, Nigerian Navy rescues crew members D’Tigers have arrived in Guangzhou in time for their classification game against Cote d’Ivoire on Friday. Having narrowly missed out of the second round ticket, the team has now set their sight on picking an automatic ticket to the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo. Head Coach, Alex Nwora, said with the victory against Korea on Tuesday, there is everything to fight for, starting with the important game against their West African rivals. Nwora said: “The team has continued to improve and we hope to step it up on Thursday. “Tunisia, Senegal, Angola and Côte d’Ivoire will all be desperate to get the Olympic ticket. “So we must get our acts right and get the job done.” During the final phase of the World Cup qualifiers, Nigeria defeated Côte d’Ivoire in Lagos 84-73 points before suffering an away 72-46 points defeat in Abidjan to hand the Ivorians a World Cup qualification lifeline. Nwora said all records are now in the past with all teams in search of a ticket to Tokyo. He said: “We have played each other in the past but this is different. “The stakes are now high and we are all aware of that. “All the games we played in the past will count for nothing at this stage.” NBBF President, Musa Kida, said considering the financial implications of prosecuting the Olympics Qualification Tournament, it is important for the team grab the only ticket on offer for Africa at the World Cup. Kida said: “Inviting players, camping them and playing the OQT will involve money, which can be channeled to developing basketball back home. “The boys are fully aware of what is at stake and the need to continue their winning run.” For the team to stand a chance of qualifying, they must win their games against Côte d’Ivoire and host China to emerge as the highest placed team in Africa, having enjoyed better points deficit compared to the other four African teams.Tags: Cote d’IvoireD’TigersFIBA World CupGunagzhoulast_img read more

Shafer says Gulley ready to return kicks again at Georgia Tech, Estime solely H-back for now

first_img Published on October 17, 2013 at 11:24 am Contact Trevor: tbhass@syr.edu | @TrevorHass Facebook Twitter Google+ With George Morris II doubtful for Saturday’s matchup against Georgia Tech, Syracuse head coach Scott Shafer said he has no reservations using Prince-Tyson Gulley in the kick return game again this week.Gulley joined Devante McFarlane on kick returns in Syracuse’s 24-10 win against North Carolina State on Saturday. Gulley brought back his only chance from the end zone to the Syracuse 26-yard line early in the fourth quarter.“Prince has always been a viable option back there,” Shafer said.As for the multi-talented freshman H-back Brisly Estime, Shafer said there’s no issue with him being able to catch the ball. He has the skill set to return kicks, but Shafer and offensive coordinator George McDonald want to ease him into his role as an H-Back before thrusting him into the return game.“The issue is he can’t have too many pots on the stove,” Shafer said.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textShafer added that it could have been the other way around. He, McDonald and Co. could have chosen to hone Estime’s return game from the start of the season, but they considered him more of an asset catching passes.He said Estime catches the ball really well and that he’s just behind Syracuse punt returner Ritchy Desir in that regard. Estime’s role could expand in the future, but for now he’s solely an H-Back.Said Shafer: “That was an educated choice by all of us.” Commentslast_img read more

16th annual hoops for a cure

first_imgOne of the longest running rivalries will continue as the Chartiers Valley High School faculty and alumni will take to the hardwoods to take on the Pittsburgh Steelers in the 16th annual “Hoops For A Cure” doubleheader on April 15 at Chartiers Valley High School. With more than $1 million raised for pancreatic cancer research, the popular “HOOPS FOR A CURE” charity event will benefit the Nathan S. Arenson Fund for Pancreatic Cancer Research, which is overseen by Dr. Olivera Finn, professor and chair at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.The “HOOPS FOR A CURE” charity doubleheader will find the Steelers and the Chartiers Valley Faculty and Alumni tangling in the 8 p.m. finale. Prior to the main event, the evening will begin with the AAAA Section 4 All-Stars taking on the WPIAL All-Stars beginning at 6:30 p.m.The event has raised more than $1 million in the past 15 years for the Nathan S. Arenson Fund for Pancreatic Cancer Research at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute.Pancreatic cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Not only is this disease common, but it also is extremely difficult to diagnose and treat.(For more information or to purchase an admission or raffle ticket in advance of the event, contact Adrienne Arenson at (412) 279-1935. If you cannot attend the event but wish to make a charitable donation, please send a check payable to “UPCI/Arenson Fund” c/o Jeff Hilty, 633 Gregg St., Bridgeville, PA 15017.)last_img read more

Lunch Break Looks to Expand RB Facilities

first_imgRED BANK – Lunch Break is looking to expand.The soup kitchen and food panty, which has been providing food, clothing and the wherewithal for those in need in Red Bank and the surrounding area for nearly 30 years, is seeking borough approval to expand its facility. The organization is looking to build an addition on adjacent properties because of what its executive director said is an increasing need for its services.“We’ve definitely outgrown the space,” said Gwendolyn Love, “even for what we’re doing now.”Love sat at a table in the 121 Drs. James Parker Blvd. facility during lunchtime on Aug. 30 as volunteers and employees worked and moved briskly, serving lunch to the crowd.As she discussed the need for more space to conduct its various programs, a woman approached the table. Chandelle Morris, who lives on Bank Street, sat down at the table with her tray and its modest lunch, a small piece of cake and fruit juice. Morris said she doesn’t have breakfast or dinner most days, relying on her lunch here as her primary meal. “It’s something I look forward to when I get up in the morning,” she said.She thanked Love for what Lunch Break had to offer and turned and said, “They are saving my life.”Love glanced over with smile and thanked Morris for making her point about the work Lunch Break does and the need for the expansion.“We believe Lunch Break can be an instrument in the community to allow people to make it to the next level,” Love said.In June 2011 Justin and Victoria Gmelich, a Rumson couple, donated to Lunch Break two properties on the boulevard, each with a vacant single-family residential home, according to Love.Lunch Break representatives will appear at the borough Zoning Board of Adjustment on Thursday, Sept. 20, with its application to combine those lots and build an addition to the current site.According to the application on file at the borough’s Planning and Zoning Depart­ment, Lunch Break would demolish the existing homes at 113-115 Drs. James Parker Blvd. and use that 7,320-square-foot tract to expand the current 2,989-square-foot facility and build a 2,091-square-foot addition.The addition’s first floor, Love said, will be used, in part, to house Lunch Break’s clothing distribution program. Currently, it operates the program on Saturdays out of the dining area, where individuals and families can come to select free clothing and small household items they need.If the application is approved, the public will be able to drop off donations and pick up items from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays.Lunch Break could also use the site for its other clothing program, called Suited for Success, where clients can get clothing appropriate for job interviews.Along with those programs, Lunch Break would continue to operate its “Internet café” on site, where clients have access to computers and use the Internet connections, often to help locate work.The remainder of the site would be used for administrative offices, file and supply storage and to provide space for the various social service agencies that regularly appear to assist Lunch Break clients.“The new space will allow us to function more efficiently,“ Love said.The addition will “create a one-stop shopping” site for clients, who often don’t have cars or money for mass transit to visit social services offices, Love said.“Business has been too good,” she acknowledged. The facility has been seeing a growing need for services.“With the economy the way it is, with people looking for help, with new people looking for that help, Lunch Break will help them move to that next level in their life,” Love said. “It’s not a handout, it’s a hand up.” By John Burtonlast_img read more

Ridge Road Run Opens the Door to Talking About Suicide

first_img“Irefuse to have what happened to Jack be for nothing,” she said. LITTLESILVER – Dawn Wilcox, an avid runner who has organized her fair share ofraces, said she realized just how different the inaugural Ridge Road Run forSuicide Prevention was going to be last year while helping out at the racepacket pickup the day before the event. Eulner,19, who just wrapped up his freshman year at the University of South Carolina, willagain serve as co-director for the race. He agreed it wasn’t until participantsbegan to arrive to pick up race packets at Road Runner Sports in Shrewsbury theday before the race that he realized the impact the race would have. While heassumed most runners would be local, Eulner said he was surprised by big groupsthat arrived from North Jersey and one man who showed him photos of hisgrandson who had died by suicide and who just looked like a “popular, normalkid who played football,” said Eulner. Thisyear’s race will be held at RBR in Little Silver – a few miles down Ridge Roadfrom last year’s setting in Rumson – Sunday, May 19 and will feature a numberof events, including a 5K, a 1-mile fun run and kiddie dash. Proceeds for thisyear’s race will benefit local organizations, designated by each high school,which Wilcox said helps benefit members of the community. Proceeds from the race will benefit mental health programs at the three organizing high schools and the Mental Health Association of Monmouth County. Forthose wishing to watch the race and cheer on the runners, the course starts infront of RBR and heads down Harding Road to Rumson Road, loops through HanceAvenue and Vista Drive before heading back to the high school on Rumson Roadtoward Harding Road. Organizersare hoping for better weather than last year’s race day, which was cold andrainy with a driving wind. But that didn’t stop all involved from feeling thewarmth of what they were doing. Helooped in students from nearby high schools – and tapped into Wilcox’sexpertise organizing races – to establish the Ridge Road Run, which was held inApril 2018 at RFH. “TheRidge Road Run was more than just a platform for suicide awareness andprevention,” said Lori Jarck, mom to Pierce, a junior at RFH at the time of hisdeath and member of the school’s lacrosse team. “It was a place where we couldremember and honor the lives of our loved ones who died by suicide.” “Wehad family members coming in and showing pictures of loved ones they had lostand telling us why this was so important to them,” said Wilcox, who organizedthe Little Silver 5K for 10 years and continues in her role as one of threedirectors of the Ridge Road Run. “It was so emotional and the energy was justso different compared to other races.” Participantscan form a team or join one of the over 30 teams registered for this year’srace, like #loveyoumorejackmoore, a group running in honor of Jack Moore ofFair Haven, a college sophomore who died by suicide in 2016, or Breaking theBarriers, in memory of Matawan teen Jordan Phillips who died by suicide inApril 2017. Studentsfrom Red Bank Regional (RBR), Rumson Fair Haven (RFH) and Red Bank Catholic(RBC) high schools came together last year to organize the Ridge Road Run aftereach school community was touched by suicide. What they thought would be a wayfor students to put aside rivalries and unite in showing support for thosestruggling with mental health issues and beginning a discussion about suicide,instead grew into a sizable race that attracted almost 1,500 participants andraised over $118,000 for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention andMental Health Association of Monmouth County.  This article originally appeared in the May 9-15 print edition of the The Two River Times. RBR junior Claudia Kelly, 17, Little Silver – who serves as race co-director again this year – said a number of people came up to her last year to say, “You don’t know how much this means to me.” Kelly, like most of the race’s organizers, had been touched by someone who struggled with depression and suicidal ideation and she wanted to do something that would give her peers an opportunity to start talking about it. Shrewsburyresident Michael Eulner was a senior at RBR last year. He was galvanized to dosomething to prevent another student suicide after seeing on social media howRFH students were impacted by the death of their classmate, Pierce Jarck, inOctober 2017. Mooresaid her mission since Jack’s death is to encourage open conversations aboutsuicide and the Ridge Road Run provides a platform to do that in a “verynon-threatening way.” But she thinks kids are more open to those discussions,which is important with all the stress and anxiety teens face and the addedpressures of social media. “We are a little snapshot of what’s going on in theworld today.” “I can’t change the past, but we can try to change the future,” said Phillips, whose son was a freshman at Matawan High School at the time of his death and a member of the school’s marching band. What’smost special about the race, according to Christine Moore – whose son, Jack,died by suicide in 2016 – was that students from three local high schoolsorganized it. “The kids embraced this on their own,” she said. “They didn’t doit because a grown-up told them it would be a good idea.” It’sthe stigma of suicide, Jarck said, that needs to be removed and people need tolearn how to talk about it, even though it can be difficult and uncomfortable. If you or someone you know has thoughts of suicide, there are people who want to help. Reach out to the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 1-800-273-8255 or Text HOME to 741741 to contact a trained crisis counselor. A confidential and anonymous helpline for New Jersey’s youth and young adults called 2nd Floor can be reached at 1-888-222-2228. LuannePhillips, whose son Jordan died by suicide in April 2017, will be at the raceagain this year and said she loved that the kids were the ones who organizedthe event and wanted to start the conversation. “It was reallyone of the most empowering days,” said Moore, Fair Haven, whose son Jack was 19and preparing to start his sophomore year at the University of Richmond when helost his battle with depression and anxiety. Reflecting on race day, she said, “Itwasn’t a sad day. I can’t stress that enough.” Get the 4-1-1 on the Ridge Road Run By Amy Byrnes The 5K race will kick off at 8:30 a.m., followed by a 1-mile fun run at 9:30 a.m. and a kiddie dash at 10 a.m. To sign up for a race, volunteer or make a donation, head to the Ridge Road Run website at ridgeroadrun.org. Describedby participants in last year’s race as “empowering” and “special,” this year’sRidge Road Run for Suicide Prevention is set for Sunday, May 19 at Red BankRegional High School in Little Silver and offers lots of opportunities toparticipate. Hesaid he thought, “This just can’t happen again,” and began talking to RBRadministrators and staff to see what he could organize to help shine a light onsuicide and mental health. As class president, he said he felt like he was in aposition to be able to create awareness throughout the Two River area. “Myson, Pierce, led a full, vibrant, loving and caring life and I hope that hewill be remembered how he lived and not how he died,” said Jarck. “The Ridge Road Run gave us the chance to outwardly and openly honor and remember our beloved Pierce.”last_img read more

SANTA MONICA STAKES QUOTES

first_imgTRAINER QUOTES MARTIN GARCIA, SWEET MARINI, SECOND: “She got a little bit tired. We were going pretty fast up front and when we got to the stretch the other horse just got by us today.” ELVIS TRUJILLO, SAM’S SISTER, WINNER: “It was the perfect trip. I knew there was going to be a lot of speed in there and I knew it would be fast early on. But I knew that sooner or later they would have to stop. She’s a nice filly. I knew Martin (Garcia on Sweet Marini) would stop; it was too fast for three horses head-to-head.” JOCKEY QUOTEScenter_img JERRY HOLLENDORFER, SAM’S SISTER, WINNER: “We got a 22 and 43 (fractions), so it makes it a little easier to close ground. We thought that might happen, but then when Dancinthenightaway kind of shook loose a little bit, it looked a little bit risky. But we were able to sustain and run her down in the end.“I’m just taking these races one at a time (when asked if she might stretch out). We thought she would run long (entered in Saturday’s La Canada at 1 1/16 miles, but scratched), but we thought this was a more advantageous race, so that’s why we went here.“We’ll take a look at a few different things (races).”NOTES: The winning owners are Mark Dedomenico of Belleview, WA; Jerry Hollendorfer of Point Richmond, CA; and George Todaro of Seattle. -30-last_img read more

Huskies hang 49 in first half, hammer Lions

first_imgForget Fortuna’s up and down regular season, the Huskies are 1-0 where it matters — the playoffs. Fortuna found no trouble against the visiting El Molino Lions, sailing to a 55-14 victory in the first round of the North Coast Section Division-IV playoffs in front of the Huskie faithful, Friday night in Fortuna.With Friday’s win the No. 6 seeded Huskies (6-5) advance to the second round of the NCS playoffs where they will face No. 3 Kennedy (8-2) next Saturday, Nov. 10 in Richmond.“Our guys …last_img

Announcing the July Featured Geocacher of the Month

first_img SharePrint RelatedAugust Featured Geocacher of the Month Nominees – Add Your CommentsAugust 16, 2012In “Community”July Featured Geocacher of the Month Nominees – Add Your CommentsJuly 20, 2012In “Community”Featured Geocacher of the Month Award WinnersAugust 25, 2011In “Community” The July featured Geocacher of the Month took matters regarding Trackables in his own hands, spiced things up, and brought a community closer together.July Featured Geocacher of the Month, De WijngemachtigdeCongratulations to De Wijngemachtigde for being named July’s Featured Geocacher of the Month!Guus, a.k.a. De Wijngemachtigde, is recognized for encouraging a record number of geocachers across the Netherlands to participate in Geocoin races.His creative approach to get the community to put their Trackables in circulation, instead of keeping them at home, allowed the coins to travel across all 415 municipalities of the Netherlands.As one geocacher put it, “Not only has he [De Wijngemachtigde] put and continues to put a lot of effort in the Dutch Geocoin race, he also frequently gives away Geocoins to other cachers through quizzes and sweepstakes. These initiatives really create a very positive vibe for geocaching in the Netherlands and beyond!”De Wijngemachtigde will receive a collector’s edition Featured Geocacher of the Month Geocoin, along with a Geocacher of the Month hat and certificate acknowledging his contributions signed by two of the founders of Geocaching.com.Featured Geocacher of the Month IconThank you to the fellow July nominees and all those who supported them. The nominees not chosen as featured Geocacher of the Month will receive a gift of appreciation from Groundspeak. See a list of all the featured Geocachers of the Month here.The geocaching community is encouraged to re-nominate those who have yet to be honored as featured Geocacher of the Month.If you know an outstanding geocacher who should be considered for the honor, send an email to geocacherofthemonth@groundspeak.com. Every nomination must meet the following requirements: Please include your name, the name of your nominee, their username, at least one picture of the nominee and description (in 500 or fewer words) explaining why he or she deserves to be the Geocacher of the Month. Please inform your nominee that you’ve submitted them for the award. Nominations for the August featured Geocacher of the Month must be received by the end of the day on Friday, August 10th.Once we have received all of the nominations, we will choose the top candidates and post them on the Latitude 47 blog. You will then get a chance to champion your favorite. Our goal is to involve the entire geocaching community in this process so we might learn from each other.Share with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

Should the DOE Increase Furnace Efficiency Standards?

first_imgDo you know when the U.S. last raised furnace efficiency standards? It was 1987. Do you know how long the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been trying to change that? At least since 2007.The past eight years have been a sad case of industry heavyweights preventing progress on this important issue. The DOE, however, just proposed a new rule, so we might finally see some action here. Do you know when it’s set to go into effect, if passed?A bit of furnace efficiency historyIn 1987, the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act set a minimum of 78% Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE). That’s when furnaces with standing pilot lights went away.In 2007, the DOE proposed raising the minimum from 78 to 80 AFUE. What?! Yes, it’s true. They really did that, even though the rule would have had pretty much zero effect on saving energy.Why? Because even though 78 AFUE was the minimum allowed, nearly every furnace being made is 80 AFUE or higher. I think I’ve seen only one new furnace that had an AFUE lower than 80. RELATED ARTICLESA New Efficiency Standard for Gas FurnacesGovernment Orders More Efficient Furnace FansAll About Furnaces and Duct Systems When HVAC Manufacturers, Efficiency Advocates Find Common GroundWater Heaters Get an Efficiency MakeoverRefrigerators Get New Efficiency StandardsCongress Plays with the Light Bulb MandateCalifornia’s Efficiency Standards Applied to TVs President Obama Orders Energy Department to Raise Appliance Efficiency Standards So the battle began. The state of California and a coalition of environmental and energy efficiency groups sued the DOE. That led to a set of regional standards, whereby Northern states (those with more than 5,000 heating degree days) would have had to go to 90 AFUE and the warmer South and Southwest would get to stick with 80 AFUE.And that’s when the American Public Gas Association (APGA) blew up. According to the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE), the APGA “argued that consumers would flock to electric resistance furnaces rather than install high-efficiency gas furnaces.” (See their article, Why DOE’s Cave on Furnace Standards Is Such a Big Deal.)There’s no way they really thought that would happen, of course. Heat pumps maybe, but electric resistance furnaces? No way. They’re not allowed for primary heating even here in Georgia, a warm state (IECC climate zones 2, 3, and 4). The truth is that the gas industry really should be afraid of heat pumps, not electric resistance heat.So the effort to enact regional standards fell apart.The latest move by the DOEOn February 10, 2015, the DOE announced a proposal to adopt a 92 AFUE standard nationwide. That’s nice. It should be higher and it should have been done a long time ago, but if enacted, it would effectively kill atmospheric combustion furnaces.There will be opposition. According to The ACHR News, Stephen Yurek, president and CEO of the Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI), said, “Now, even though natural gas and oil prices are lower than they were [three years ago when the DOE issued regional standards] — in the case of oil, much lower — the DOE now feels a 92 percent nationwide standard is appropriate. How can that be? What’s changed?”And the Air Conditioning Contractors of America seems to be getting itself ready for opposition. “It’s very aggressive,” said senior vice president Charlie McCrudden in the same ACHR News article. “This would harm a lot of people, including those in lower income brackets.”So, as homes are required to reach greater levels of airtightness, the furnace efficiency circus continues.Oh, another thing: Do you know when the new requirement would go into effect, if approved? 2021. At the earliest.Pros and consChanging the minimum efficiency of equipment available isn’t a big deal for new homes. Yeah, the cost is a little higher, but it’s existing homes that will feel the biggest blow if the DOE proposal gets approved.DOE efficiency standards for equipment, however, cannot distinguish between new homes and existing homes. The DOE’s efficiency standards apply to equipment, not uses of equipment. So if the DOE approves this proposal, anyone changing out an atmospheric combustion furnace afterward will also have to change out the flue. That could add several hundred dollars to the cost. It may increase it even more, and in multifamily buildings, the difficulty level will be higher.The obvious benefit of going to a higher efficiency furnace is the energy savings. Going from 80 AFUE to 92 or, better, 95 AFUE will reduce the amount of natural gas or propane being used and save money for the homeowners. Unfortunately, the price of gas is really low in a lot of places now, so return on investment may not be favorable.The biggest reason to make the change, in my opinion, isn’t energy savings though. It’s indoor air quality. Condensing, sealed combustion furnaces that bring in their own combustion air won’t backdraft a natural draft water heater (which is still allowed in homes). It won’t depressurize a home and suck in bad air from the garage or moldy crawl space. And it won’t ever spill exhaust gases into a home when common-vented with a natural draft water heater because it cannot be common-vented.It’s past time to make this change. Let’s go, DOE. Make it happen.External Resources DOE – Rulemaking for Residential Furnaces Energy Conservation StandardsDOE page on residential furnacesACEEE – Why DOE’s Cave on Furnace Standards Is Such a Big DealAppliance Standards Awareness Project page on furnaces Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, energy consultant, RESNET-certified trainer, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. Check out his in-depth course, Mastering Building Science at Heatspring Learning Institute, and follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard.last_img read more