H1N1 FLU BREAKING NEWS: American attitudes, work absences in Britain, Canada’s vaccination plans

first_imgAmericans not worried about H1N1 but will get vaccineMore than 60% of Americans say they are not worried about the novel H1N1 flu, but 55% plan to get the H1N1 vaccine for themselves or someone in their household, according to a Washington Post ABC News Poll. The poll indicates that about one in eight Americans is very worried that the pandemic will affect his or her family, while twice as many are not at all worried, the Post reported. Nearly 75% were confident that the government will be able to cope effectively with the epidemic.http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/08/19/AR2009081901585.htmlAug 19 Washington Post storyMany British firms have had H1N1-related absencesIn a survey of 429 small and medium-sized British companies, 72% said they had weathered staff absenteeism because of the H1N1 flu and 38% expected that their sales would suffer, Reuters reported yesterday. The survey by the law firm Eversheds also found that one in five businesses said they expected to have to close or partially close premises, and 87% said they had introduced new sanitation measures to combat the virus.http://www.reuters.com/article/internal_ReutersNewsRoom_ExclusivesAndWins_MOLT/idUSTRE57I42920090819Aug 19 Reuters reportCanada expects November vaccination launch, adequate supplyCanadian officials hope to license the country’s novel flu vaccine and begin immunizing people in November, the Canadian Press reported yesterday. Canada’s vaccine supplier, GlaxoSmithKline, will ship about 10 to 15 million doses and will be able to quickly replenish supplies as healthcare workers administer the vaccine to patients. Officials project that GSK’s antigen production will outpace its fill-and-finish capacity but said finishing the vaccine elsewhere would cause delays.Australian doctors question country’s vaccination plans Australia’s major infectious disease society is questioning the safety of the country’s novel H1N1 vaccination plans, the Australian Broadcasting Corp. reported today. In a letter to the government, the Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases cited a risk of cross-contamination when using multidose vials and said the flu epidemic has subsided, so the campaign needn’t be rushed. A spokeswoman for vaccine maker CSL countered that the single-dose approach would be slower and more expensive.http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009/08/20/2662321.htm?section=justinAug 20 Australian Broadcasting Corp. storyNovel H1N1 deaths in Latin America exceed 1,300Deaths from H1N1 flu in Latin America, the world’s hardest-hit region, have reached 1,303, more than 70% of the global total of 1,799 listed by the World Health Organization, Agence France-Presse reported yesterday. Argentina has had 404 deaths, the second-highest toll after the United States’ 477, and Brazil has 368, the story said. Trailing Brazil are Mexico, with 164 deaths; Chile, 105; and Peru, 62.Zimbabwe, Belarus report first novel flu casesZimbabwe’s health ministry today announced the confirmation of the country’s first novel H1N1 cases, in five private-school children who got sick in early August, Agence France-Presse reported. Doctors at Zimbabwe’s state hospitals are on strike over wage and allowance issues, but the health minister said the medical system is coping. Meanwhile, Belarus confirmed its first novel flu case yesterday, in a Chinese man who had recently returned from visiting China, the Interfax news agency reported.last_img read more

Virus-hit Iran says masks compulsory from next week

first_imgHe also did not say what the penalty would be for those who fail to observe the measure.According to deputy health minister Iraj Harirchi, services would not be provided to those without masks in areas such as government organizations and shopping malls.But implementing the measure may be difficult, as according to Tehran’s mayor, many do not wear masks in places like the capital’s public transport network, where it is already mandatory.”Fifty percent of metro passengers wear masks… and even fewer in buses,” Mayor Pirouz Hanachi was quoted as saying by the semi-official ISNA news agency.”We can’t forcefully confront people without masks,” he added. President Hassan Rouhani said Iran would have to live with the virus for the “long haul”, as he announced the latest measures to combat it.Mask-wearing would be “obligatory in covered spaces where there are gatherings”, he said during a televised meeting of the country’s anti-virus taskforce.According to him, the measure would come into force as of next week, continue until July 22 and would be extended if necessary.Rouhani said the health ministry had devised “a clear list” of the types of spaces and gatherings deemed high-risk, but he did not elaborate. ‘Red’ countiesIran reported its first COVID-19 cases on February 19 and it has since struggled to contain the outbreak.The health ministry on Sunday announced 144 virus deaths in the past 24 hours, its highest for a single day since April 5, raising the total to 10,508.Spokeswoman Sima Sadat Lari also raised total confirmed infections to 222,669, with 2,489 new cases during the same period.Official figures have shown an upward trajectory in new confirmed cases since early May, when Iran hit a near two-month low in daily recorded infections.”Considering the rising numbers, I plead with you to definitely use masks outside and in covered places,” Lari said.Iran closed schools, cancelled public events and banned movement between its 31 provinces in March, but the government progressively lifted restrictions from April to try to reopen its sanctions-hit economy.The economy is starting to suffer under the pressures of the health crisis.The country’s currency, the rial, has hit new lows against the US dollar in recent days, mostly over border closures and a halt in non-oil exports, according to analysts.The increasing virus caseload has seen some previously unscathed provinces classified as “red” — the highest level on Iran’s color-coded risk scale — with authorities allowing them to reimpose restrictive measures if required.According to Rouhani, the measure would also be extended to provinces with “red” counties.”Any county that is red, its provincial (virus) committee can propose reimposing limitations for a week”, which could be extended if needed, he said.The government launched an “#I wear a mask” campaign on Saturday and pleaded with Iranians to observe guidelines aimed at curbing infections.One Iranian is infected with COVID-19 every 33 seconds and one dies from the disease every 13 minutes, Harirchi said on Saturday.Zanjan county in northwestern Iran has already reimposed restrictive measures for two weeks, its governor said in a televised interview.It followed a “certain indifference from Zanjan residents and as the number of our [virus] deaths picked up again in recent weeks,” said Alireza Asgari.The limitations include closing wedding halls and a ban on funeral events held at mosques, as they can lead to large gatherings, he added. Iran said Sunday it will make mask-wearing mandatory in certain areas and has allowed virus-hit provinces to reimpose restrictions, as novel coronavirus deaths mounted in the Middle East’s worst-hit country.The new steps were announced as Iran counted 144 new fatalities from the COVID-19 disease, its highest death toll for a single day in almost three months.The Islamic republic has refrained from enforcing full lockdowns to stop the pandemic’s spread, and the use of masks and protective equipment has been optional in most areas. Topics :last_img read more

Poll finds stoned staff a growing concern

first_imgStuff.co.nz 17 April 2014Getting high before work is common for a wide range of Kiwis – and employers are increasingly undertaking drug testing themselves.The Global Drug Survey 2014, conducted in partnership with Fairfax Media, found that, of the 5646 New Zealand participants, 13.7 per cent of respondents had in the past year taken drugs, including alcohol, less than two hours before starting work.A further 13.8 per cent had done so, but not in the past year.One industry where illicit drug use was reported to be common was farming.Warrick Cocker, who works on a small south Wairarapa dairy farm, said he knew of a farm where workers grew their own marijuana, but they got the job done so their boss did not care.A 29-year-old man, who did not wish to be identified, reported that he showed up to work stoned every day for five years while he worked on farms in Waikato, Canterbury and Southland.“There’s only three or four people working on a farm, and there’s always been one person who had weed,” he said. “We’d just get real high and do our work. This isn’t like a little bit of weed, this is smoking three or four times, every time we come back to the house for a break.”http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/9951035/Poll-finds-stoned-staff-a-growing-concernlast_img read more

Culture of hate and lack of respect permeating through society

first_img Sharing is caring! Share Share 58 Views   2 comments Sharecenter_img LocalNews Culture of hate and lack of respect permeating through society by: – April 19, 2012 Tweet Photo credit: bumperstickermagnet.comPrime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit has spoken out against what he refers to as a ‘culture of hate’ and disrespect permeating through society.Mr. Skerrit who was a guest on the Next Level Radio Program on Tuesday evening said while everyone has a right which they can exercise; they must also consider that rights come with responsibilities.While he identified that there is a culture of hate, he said the difficulty lies in “getting rid of it”.Mr. Skerrit believes that there are too many citizens who are “not caring enough” who are disrespectful towards authority and do not set proper examples for the young people.“We have to start speaking about respect, we are lacking in respect for people, for ourselves, for each other, for our fellow classmates, for our family members, for our friends, for our co-workers. A society cannot maintain peace and law and order if people think that it is ok to disrespect authority. You have a responsibility to the state; whether you like the government or not, you have to respect the authority established”. Mr. Skerrit explained further that there has been an attack on the office of the president, prime minister and bishop among others, yet community activists and leaders have not condemned thisdisrespectful behavior.He believes that this lack of respect is also responsible for the increase in crime and violence.“It is the first time in our history people are attacking a president like that and then you don’t get these people condemning it and then we want to have people from all over the world come and tell us about how to fight crime; crime can be solved by ourselves”.The prime minister said respect must be instilled in citizens to prevent the culture of disrespect to dissipate. Hon. Roosevelt Skerrit (file photo)“People walk on you these days they don’t say good morning or good afternoon to others at all. People believe that they can curse anybody; they can curse a priest, they can curse a school teacher, they can walk in and slap the teacher of the school, they can curse the police, they can do anything that they want because we have a culture in the society that promotes that level of disrespect”.He also called on parents to be careful what they say in the presence of children and to pray with them.“Some parents believe that it is so good to listen to talk shows first thing in the morning before their children go to school instead of kneeling down and praying with their children. They don’t pray with their children but they put on talk shows first thing in the morning; they don’t pray with their children anymore”.Mr. Skerrit also noted that there are too few “edifying and educational programs” and that citizens need to go to church.“The churches are empty, there is nothing edifying, nothing educational and then we talk about neighbourhood watch? We don’t need neighbourhood watch in the country we need respect”.“What we need is respect for each other and unless we bring back respect for each other we will be doing all sorts of things,” he concluded.Dominica Vibes Newslast_img read more

Batsmen let India down against South Africa – Kohli

first_imgSKIPPER Virat Kohli insisted India’s batsmen must take the blame for a Test series loss to a South Africa side that he admitted were better in every department.Debutant Lungi Ngidi tore into the tourists on the final day of the second Test, the paceman taking 6-39 as the top-ranked side were bowled out for only 151 to suffer a 135-run defeat at Centurion.Victory for the Proteas gave them a 2-0 lead with only one match to play, leaving India still without a Test series success on South African soil.It is the first time in three years that India have lost a series in the longest format and captain Kohli, a centurion in the first innings, was left to rue the inability of a star-studded batting line-up to deliver.“When we went in I told the guys it looks very different to what we saw before the toss. I felt we gained momentum from the way South Africa lost wickets in the first innings and we should have capitalised: we were in a position to get a lead if we could have had a good partnership,” said the skipper.“That is something we have let ourselves down with from the first game and also in the second. It is the batsmen that have let us down again.“We tried our best, it was just not good enough and South Africa were better than we (were) in every department, especially fielding.”The prolific Kohli took no consolation from his magnificent 153, which left his side trailing by only 28 after the first innings.“The 150 means nothing, we’ve lost the game and the series,” he added. “If the 150 had won the game for my team that would have mattered, but having not won the game personal milestones do not matter to me at all.”last_img read more