Victor Moses ‘will complete £9m move to Chelsea’

first_imgWigan star Victor Moses is set to join Chelsea for £9m, the Daily Mirror say.It is claimed that Latics chairman Dave Whelan has agreed to a deal worth less than the £10m he insisted it would take to prise the former Crystal Palace forward away from Wigan.Moses is now tipped to discuss personal terms and complete his move to Stamford Bridge.The Mirror also say Chelsea plan make-or-break talks with Marseille on Monday to try to land Spanish right-back Cesar Azpilicueta – and that QPR’s Joey Barton is on the verge of a season-long loan move to Blackpool.It is claimed Barton is open to the idea of joining the Tangerines and that Blackpool are keen to sign him in order to get one over their neighbours Fleetwood Town.Barton, who is banned for the first 12 matches of the season, has been training with Fleetwood and it has been suggested that he could join them on loan.This page is regularly updated.See also:Saints confident of seeing off Chelsea’s interest in youngster – reportFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Changing Stories at Saturn and Titan

first_img(Visited 28 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 News from the ringed planet and its largest moon shows scientists can’t keep their stories straight when trying to keep Saturn billions of years old.Saturn NewsAge of the rings:  First they were old, then they were young, now they are old again.  Mike Wall at Live Science claims that the “age of Saturn’s rings” has been “revealed.”  The revelation was not inspired, though: “Saturn’s iconic rings likely formed about 4.4 billion years ago, shortly after the planet itself took shape, a new study suggests.”  How, then, do they remain so pristine?  How do they keep from grinding down to dust?  How do they escape the constant bombardment of micrometeorites and atomic nuclei?  Sascha Kempf (U of Colorado) bases his judgment on the low particle count coming from the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) for which he is a prime investigator.  The extremely low hit rate (10-19 g/cm2-s-1) at 2 to 50 Saturn radii is “consistent with an old ring system,” he says – at least for the main rings.  The article did not address how the more ephemeral D, F, G, and E rings are maintained, or how the rings survive other destructive processes like sputtering, collisional spreading, gas drag, and sunlight pressure.  CDA only detects dust, not ions.  For a primer on Saturn’s rings, see a feature on Space.com.Tiny blip to moon factory:  A barely-visible lump at the outer edge of the A ring is causing some to imagine Saturn as a modern moon maker.  “A rebellious moon might have just popped out of Saturn’s rings,” Lisa Grossman wrote for New Scientist.  Cassini scientists saw a disturbance that has quieted down.  What does it mean?  If a tiny “weird object” popped out, it’s too small to see – less than a kilometer wide.  But they gave it the name “Peggy” anyway.  This object (if it exists) might grow into a moon, they say, but then again, it might have been destroyed in a collision.  They didn’t explain how a moon-growing process could go on for billions of years.  If material is being lost from the rings continually, why is there a finite number of small moons, and where does new material come from to replenish what is lost?Plasma in, plasma out:  Remarkably, most of the plasma in Saturn’s magnetosphere comes from the little geysering moon Enceladus, when its water gets dissociated and swept into the magnetic field.  That puts plasma in; what takes it out?  The plasma content appears to be nearly in a steady state.  An article on PhysOrg suggests that Saturn’s fast rotation sets up currents that sweep excess ions down the magnetotail.  The article did not address the question of how long the tiny Arizona-sized moon Enceladus could feed the giant.A hex on Saturn:  A beautiful color movie of Saturn’s north polar hexagon made the news on Dec. 4 (see JPL press release).  This atmospheric feature – unique in the solar system – is thought to form by standing waves in a jet stream, but there are mysteries.  The nearest analogy mentioned is the ozone hole at Earth’s south pole, but most such features are “notoriously turbulent and unstable,” atmospheric scientist Andrew Ingersoll said.  “A hurricane on Earth typically lasts a week, but this has been here for decades – and who knows – maybe centuries.”  The images are clear enough to see “small vortices rotating in the opposite direction of the hexagon,” some as large as Earth hurricanes.  A massive storm rotates at the center of the 220,000-mile-across feature.  The south pole has a similar vortex, but no hexagon.Titan NewsTitan swamped:  Titan is Saturn’s largest moon.  Keeping Titan old for billions of years requires erasing all the craters that should be there.  Only 11 have been found for certain; another 50 are “potential” craters.  Science Magazine tried various crater erasing theories.  Sediments from mountain lakes?  No; some craters are out in the plains.  Wind-blown sand from the dunes?  No; there’s no sand in the crater-free polar regions.  Cryovolcanoes?  Doesn’t explain why craters are in some regions and not others.  Methane rain?  Not fast enough to erase a large crater.  The latest theory is that Titan has a methane-soaked, swampy surface hundreds of meters deep.  Impactors would sink into the quicksand-like material, leaving no trace.  There are exceptions, like well-preserved craters in the Xanadu lowlands (Titan’s oldest terrain), that require some ad hoc reasoning to explain.  Maybe those craters were formed when the surface was dry, before the atmosphere formed.  It’s convenient that none of those theory-rescuing factors are observable, otherwise someone might think Titan is young.Glorifying Titan’s methane lakes:  Titan’s north polar lakes made news on two fronts.  For one, the radar mapper has a big enough composite picture to amaze viewers.  Simon Redfern at The Conversation gave a nice write-up and picture, with video clip, of the latest buzz.  See also coverage by the BBC News, New Scientist, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory.   The other news comes from Cassini radar’s chance to ping the depth of one of the large northern seas named Ligeia Mare.  Bounces from the bottom of the lake indicate it is 170 meters deep (like Lake Michigan) at most.  Surprisingly, its radar transparency suggests it is filled primarily with methane (CH4), not ethane (C2H6) as expected.  Though not nearly the global ocean once predicted, the lake is still a big container; nearby Kraken Mare is four or more times as large.  “The total volume of the hydrocarbon Titanic seas corresponds to around 300 times that of Earth’s oil reserves, in a celestial body smaller than Earth,” Redfern said.  (Titan’s diameter would just about cover the United States.) Space.com states the volume is estimated to be 2,000 cubic miles.Still, that much fluid falls far short of the global ocean predicted:Jeffrey Kargel, from the University of Arizona Tucson, pointed out that the presence of extensive methane seas and lakes at Titan’s north pole makes worse a long acknowledged deficiency of heavier hydrocarbons expected from models of Titan’s chemistry.  Among them are ethane, ethylene, propylene, acetylene and benzene – heavy hydrocarbons generated as sunlight causes chemical reactions in Titan’s soup of natural gas.(We’ve reported on the ethane deficit problem since before Cassini arrived at Saturn; search on Titan for entries.)  Another puzzle, though, is how smooth the liquid surface is.  Radar measurements show that there are no ripples higher than 1 millimeter.  That’s as smooth as the paint on your car.  This is surprising for a moon windy enough to form a belt of large sand dunes around the equator.Titan get-together:  The uncharacteristic size of Titan compared to all the other Saturn moons makes planetary scientists wonder how it got there.  Science Now addressed the puzzles that Douglas Hamilton [U of Maryland] is trying to answer:Titan is dominatingly big, having almost twice the mass of Earth’s moon and comprising 90% of the mass in orbit about Saturn. Titan is alone, orbiting in a million-kilometer gap bounded by tiny moons. And Titan’s orbit is odd: It is slightly elliptical rather than nearly circular and is tilted with respect to Saturn’s equator. With all those oddities, Hamilton said, “the biggest mystery is how it came to be in the first place.“Hamilton’s latest proposal is that several small moons got together to form the giant.  This would explain why there’s a gap.  Assuming tidal interactions affected the collisions, it would also explain the strange orbit.  To make it work, Hamilton has to assume the collisions were gentle, so the bodies would merge instead of splatter.  It’s also ad hoc; “even Hamilton acknowledges he’s not sure how he would ‘prove’ that he is right.”  How all that nitrogen and methane got into its atmosphere is for others to figure out.Futures:  Cassini has about 3 and a half more years to go before the end of its second extended mission.  Planned observations include more Titan mapping, an Enceladus plume fly-through in August 2014, shots of Enceladus’s north pole, high-altitude studies of the rings, and as much science as the limited fuel will allow before the orbiter’s death plunge into Saturn in 2017.  Having observed Titan since before its equinox, scientists are excited to watch for changes in the lakes and dunes as the Saturn system approaches northern solstice.  Will the lakes migrate from the north pole to the south?  Only time will tell.In my 14 years’ experience on the Cassini team, I had the opportunity to meet and talk with many of the scientists, and hear them lecture, including Sascha Kempf and Andy Ingersoll.  There is no question all the JPL scientists are extremely smart and talented at what they do.  They got a bus-sized spacecraft to Saturn after all.  They cannot see their bias, though, when it comes to dating things.  The Age of the Solar System (A.S.S.) is a Law of the Misdeeds and Perversions, which cannot be altered (from Daniel 6:8).  It’s not that these scientists are incapable of conceiving a younger age than 4.5 billion years, it’s that their brains have marinated in millions-and-billions language throughout their education and career, it never enters their minds to follow the evidence for youth honestly; the old age is a great Truth that they all Know.  I’ve heard one of them say that he was trying to make Saturn’s rings last for billions of years for “philosophical reasons,” implying that the idea of young rings was repugnant to him.Another factor is the “herd mentality” among scientists (see 12/09/13).  These scientists all know each other.  They meet at international conferences several times a year.  They give presentations to one another.  While there is some limited latitude for unique ideas that don’t stray from the A.S.S., there is no question that wanting to be liked and accepted by their peers is a factor in their behavior.  None of them wants to hear his esteemed colleagues call out “boo” or indicate disgust with an idea too far outside the paradigm.  This is how a consensus can form and persist despite powerful evidence against it.  No ad-hoc scenario is too bizarre to prevent a kick in the A.S.S.  And when you consider that youth of planets is often associated with the despised “young earth creationists,” none of them would ever dare to give aid and comfort to such “anti-science” outcasts.  Evidence be damned; long live the consensus!It appears hopeless to penetrate the dogma in this community, even if an individual here or there might be open to consider out-of-the-box ideas.  Probably it will take a younger community doing a better job of explaining things outside the paradigm, over time as the old graybeards fade away.  Meanwhile, we’ll keep reporting the news here, praising the good, pointing out the bad, and asking questions the paradigm never considers.Research projects: (1) Calculate the volume of Titan’s lakes and see if the production rate of ethane can account for it in 4.5 billion years.  Is there an upper limit?  (2) Calculate the output of plasma by Enceladus and infer the water emission rate.  What percentage of the moon’s mass would have to be ejected over 4.5 billion years?  (3) Considering the rate of dust measured by the CDA instrument, what would be the maximum age of the rings?last_img read more

The case for corn price rally potential

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLCThe March corn futures have been range bound for the last 150 days, usually staying within a tight trading range of $3.70 to $3.90. March corn was only above $3.90 for 3 days during that time, and over the last 100 days, March corn has traded below $3.70 for only 3 days.This lack of movement is clearly illustrated in only a 10-cent range for the closing prices of March corn on the last 8 Fridays:1/18 – $3.811/11 – $3.781/4 – $3.8312/28 – $3.7512/21 – $3.7812/14 – $3.8412/7 – $3.8511/30 – $3.78.Current corn fundamentals paint a picture from a macro level that suggests realistic expectations for higher corn price potential. Global position: U.S. corn is the lowest priced corn globally based on prices today. U.S. corn is about 5 cents lower than Argentina and 15 cents below the Ukraine. Upcoming planting acre estimates: Corn needs nearly 3 to 4 million additional acres planted in 2019. Currently the new crop corn/bean ratio is 2.36 : 1. While this should encourage farmers to switch a small number of bean acres to corn, it might not be as much as was assumed was possible two months ago. The wet fall could have prevented some acres from getting the necessary fertilizer or fall field work done when prices were much more favorable to plant corn. Carryout: March corn is trading 30 cents higher today versus a year ago. Last year saw March corn rally 30 cents from this date forward when the carryout was reduced from 2.3 billion at harvest time to 2 billion as the year continued on. Currently the carryout is projected at 1.78 billion and may be reduced to 1.7 billion pending the final yield number from the USDA. Even if the carryout isn’t lowered further this will still be the lowest carryout in 4 years. Demand: Corn demand has been steady the past couple of months. Exports continue to be strong, feed demand has been steady, and the ethanol grind has maybe only slowed a little. There is a good chance all three will offset each other to keep demand the same or maybe even generate a slight increase. Still, until the government can reopen to provide production and usage information, everyone is in the dark.Overall corn has several positive fundamentals going into spring, which could mean good news down the road for farmers. If China would start buying a little corn to offset the trade imbalance, which has been discussed in the trade, the news for farmers could be even better. Does fertilizer buying correlate with corn selling?Several farmers throughout the Midwest asked for my thoughts on selling corn when making fertilizer purchases for their 2019 crop. Evidently these farmers had been approached by fertilizer sales teams trying to show a correlation between corn and fertilizer prices and how they should sell some of their corn when they buy their fertilizer.I don’t have the details of the sales pitch the farmers were given to give any advice there. However, I can look at the effects of purchasing fertilizer on farm operation budgets as well as the correlation between corn and fertilizer prices. Comparing fertilizer and corn prices the same wayIn most years fertilizer prices don’t change more than $100 per ton year over year. While $100 per ton may sound like a lot, the price per acre is low and usually only amounts to about 11 cents per bushel at most on the budget. I calculate all farm operation budgets on a cost per bushel, so prices are comparable to each other (i.e. apples to apples). That small of an effect on the cost of production doesn’t compare to the more than 85-cent range that corn futures had during the last growing year.There are many things that can affect fertilizer prices, here are just a few:Fertilizer production inputs are a major factor. For example, natural gas is the main ingredient in many fertilizers, so big shifts in natural gas prices can change the demand structure. But, there are also substitute fertilizers not containing natural gas that could increase or decrease production to offset big price adjustments.Acre shifts could have an impact, but a change bigger than 5% in either direction is rare. While a 5% shift could send an initial price spike or dip in the short-term, the impact long-term should be minimal.Seasonally fertilizer prices have highs and lows pending demand. Just as there are seasonal trends for corn that would suggest that prices will be the lowest at harvest there seems to be a season pattern to fertilizer that happens when farmers aren’t usually applying the product. Usage correlation between fertilizer and cornThe total tonnage of fertilizer used per acre is 20 to 70 times less than the total tonnage of grain harvested from the same acre, depending on the type of fertilizer applied. So, I don’t see how this would be a relationship between the price of either commodity. The sheer size difference is just too big to be relatable. Plus, in reviewing historical data, I couldn’t find any type of trend to support a price correlation between the two commodities.So no, I wouldn’t adjust my corn marketing strategy to align with my fertilizer purchasing. They are different commodities with separate and independent price fluctuations. Instead, I would just buy fertilizer when it looks like the right price at the time of year it makes sense for my operation. And I don’t see any reason to sell some corn, just because I bought fertilizer on the same day. Please email jon@superiorfeed.com with any questions or to learn more. Jon grew up raising corn and soybeans on a farm near Beatrice, NE. Upon graduation from The University of Nebraska in Lincoln, he became a grain merchandiser and has been trading corn, soybeans and other grains for the last 18 years, building relationships with end-users in the process. After successfully marketing his father’s grain and getting his MBA, 10 years ago he started helping farmer clients market their grain based upon his principals of farmer education, reducing risk, understanding storage potential and using basis strategy to maximize individual farm operation profits. A big believer in farmer education of futures trading, Jon writes a weekly commentary to farmers interested in learning more and growing their farm operations.Trading of futures, options, swaps and other derivatives is risky and is not suitable for all persons. All of these investment products are leveraged, and you can lose more than your initial deposit. Each investment product is offered only to and from jurisdictions where solicitation and sale are lawful, and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations in such jurisdiction. The information provided here should not be relied upon as a substitute for independent research before making your investment decisions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC is merely providing this information for your general information and the information does not take into account any particular individual’s investment objectives, financial situation, or needs. All investors should obtain advice based on their unique situation before making any investment decision. The contents of this communication and any attachments are for informational purposes only and under no circumstances should they be construed as an offer to buy or sell, or a solicitation to buy or sell any future, option, swap or other derivative. The sources for the information and any opinions in this communication are believed to be reliable, but Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of such information or opinions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC and its principals and employees may take positions different from any positions described in this communication. Past results are not necessarily indicative of future results.last_img read more

Five 3D Applications for the iPhone

first_imgA Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Bonus: Coming Soon – Carnival CrazeCanadian kids’ broadcaster Family Channel, the Sheridan Visualization Design Institute, and Spatial View Inc. collaborated, through an Ontario Centres of Excellence OCE project, to create a glasses-free 3D mini game called Carnival Craze. The game is aimed at kids ages eight through fourteen. The application is currently undergoing the iTunes App Store approval process. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 2. 3DeeVUsion3DVUsion is an application that lets you turn your own photos saved in the iPhone’s photo library into 3D images. With the app, you can select a pair of images from the library for viewing. sarah perez Spatial View Inc., a company known for developing both hardware and software-based 3D display technologies, recently released a 3D software development kit for the iPhone. Applications developed using this kit are 3D-enabled – with no special glasses required! In order to see the 3D content, however, you will need to purchase a special protective case called the Wazabee 3DeeShell ($49.99) that contains a lens that can be slid in and out as needed. To demonstrate the capabilities of this technology, the company also released a handful of 3D applications including everything from photo viewers to 3D games.1. 3DeeFriendsThe 3DeeFriends app lets you view your Facebook photo albums and those belonging to your Facebook friends in 3D. Photos can be viewed either as an anaglyph, interlaced, side by side, or as a cross over 3D image. Tags:#Apple#Product Reviews#web 5. Hunter 3DeeHunter 3Dee is a top-down space shooter iPhone game. It offers two zones and six levels of play, all of which are in 3D. Related Posts 3. 3Dee!oaderWith 3Dee!oader, you can both manage your Flickr photos and view them in 3D. You can load images side-by-side and convert them on-the-fly to anaglyphs. You’re also able to search, view, and manage your Flickr account from your iPhone and save Flickr photos for later viewing. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 4. 3DeeCameraThe 3DeeCamera application lets you create 3D images using your built-in iPhone camera. You can take two side-by-side photos or choose two stereo-pairs from storage to create the 3D images by shifting, rotating, and scaling the image pairs. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Four held in U.P. for ‘objectionable’ social media posts on Pulwama

first_imgThe Uttar Pradesh police have arrested at least four persons in different districts for posting allegedly objectionable remarks on social media on the Pulwama suicide attack. A youth identified as Mohammad Osama was arrested in Mau for allegedly justifying the Pulwama attack, the police said. A resident of Madanpur area, Mr. Osama, in a Facebook post, called the attack a retaliation for the atrocities committed by the Army in Kashmir. He was booked under Section 153A of the Indian Penal Code and Section 66 of the IT Act.Superintendent of Police Surendra Bahadur said “communal harmony could have been disturbed by the objectionable post”. In Ballia, one Ravi Prakash Maurya was arrested on similar charges, while in Lucknow, a first-year student, Razab Khan, was arrested and also expelled from his college for an objectionable post on Pulwama, the police said.Pro-Pak. sloganThe police arrested one Taufeek at Bansi in Siddharthnagar district for allegedly writing a pro-Pakistan slogan on Facebook.The police crackdown comes after a student of Aligarh Muslim University was on Friday booked for allegedly posting an objectionable tweet on the CRPF personnel who died in the suicide attack. Basim Hilal, a mathematics student at the university, allegedly posted on Twitter, “How’s the Jaish? Great Sir,” playing on a dialogue from the recently released film Uri. A case has been registered against the student, who hails from Jammu and Kashmir, at the Civil Lines police station in Aligarh. The university has also suspended him.last_img read more

England and India seek improvement in Reliance ICC Test Team Rankings Table

first_imgTeam India captain M S Dhoni. Reuters The five-Test series between England and India gets underway in Nottingham on Wednesday 9 July, with both sides aiming to improve their rankings in the Reliance ICC Test Team Rankings Table.As things stand at present, India occupies fourth position with 102 ratings points, while England is one spot behind with 100 ratings points. Depending upon the outcome of the Test series, both teams can go as high as number three or drop to as low as number seven.For India, the equation is straightforward: a series win will be sufficient to help it leapfrog Pakistan into third position.However, a vault up the rankings is a bit trickier for England, which needs to win the series by a difference of no less than two Tests to take on third place. Victory by just one Test will help it swap places with India.Meanwhile, both teams can potentially drop to number seven. If India wins all five Tests, then Alastair Cook’s side will plummet to seventh position, while a 4-1 series result will see England slip to sixth. Conversely, if England wins the series by 4-0 or better, then India will drop to seventh spot.To find out exactly how the forthcoming series will affect the Rankings Table, please click here. The ODI and T20I Rankings tables, unlike the Test Rankings Table, are updated after every match.Movement is also expected on the Reliance ICC Player Rankings for Test Batsmen.India’s Cheteshwar Pujara, static in seventh place, will have the opportunity to break into the top five, while Virat Kohli, who currently occupies tenth position, will have the chance to consolidate his place in the top 10.advertisementReliance ICC Test Team Rankings tableRank      Team                Rating     1          Australia             123            2          South Africa       123           3          Pakistan              103  4          India                   102   5          England              100             6          Sri Lanka            96              7          New Zealand         938          West Indies           749          Zimbabwe             4010        Bangladesh           21Pujara trails fifth-ranked Shivnarine Chanderpaul by 35 ratings points, while Kohli needs 16 ratings points to both move ahead of Ross Taylor of New Zealand and also break the 800-point barrier.Ian Bell, in 18th place, is the only batsman from England to find a place amongst the top 20.Outside the top 20, batsmen likely to be seen in action from both the sides are Alistair Cook (21st), Joe Root (26th), MS Dhoni (29th), Matt Prior (32nd), Rohit Sharma (33rd), Murali Vijay (42nd), Ajinikya Rahane (45th) and Shikhar Dhawan (50th).Gary Ballance and Sam Robson, who did well for England against Sri Lanka, are in 83rd and 94th places, respectively.India’s Ravichandran Ashwin in seventh position is the highest-ranked bowler from either side in the Reliance ICC Player Rankings for Test Bowlers. James Anderson (12th) and Stuart Broad (14th) are the other bowlers to feature inside the top 20.Other bowlers to watch out for are Ishant Sharma (23rd), Ravindra Jadeja (26th), Mohammed Shami (33rd), Ben Stokes (46th), Liam Plunkett (50th), Bhuvneshwar Kumar (73rd) and Chris Woakes (118th).In the All-rounders’ table, Ashwin (second) and Stuart Broad (fifth) feature in the top five.Series schedule:9-13 July –    1st Test, Nottingham17-21 July –  2nd Test, Lord’s27-31 July –  3rd Test, Southampton7-11 August – 4th Test, Manchester15-19 August – 5th Test, The OvalReliance ICC Test Team Rankings tableRank       Team                Rating     1          Australia             123            2          South Africa       123           3          Pakistan             103  4          India                   102   5          England              100             6          Sri Lanka            96              7          New Zealand      938          West Indies         749          Zimbabwe           4010        Bangladesh        21(Developed by David Kendix)Reliance ICC Test Player RankingsBatsmen (top 10) Rank        Player                   Team     Points       Ave         HS Rating   1           AB de Villiers         SA           922        51.94       935 v Aus at Port Elizabeth 2014   2           K Sangakkara       SL           896        58.63        938 v Eng at Kandy 2007   3           Hashim Amla        SA           873        51.35        907 v Pak at Abu Dhabi 2013   4           David Warner       Aus         871!       46.54         871 v SA at Cape Town 2014   5           S.Chanderpaul     WI          854        51.88          901 v NZ at Napier 2008   6           Misbah-ul-Haq     Pak         824!       48.75          824 v SL at Sharjah 2014   7           C Pujara              Ind          819*      58.92            851 v SA at Durban 2013   8           Michael Clarke     Aus         818        51.50          900 v SL at Melbourne 2012   9           Ross Taylor          NZ          795        46.43           871 v WI at Hamilton 2013  10         Virat Kohli             Ind          784!       46.51          784 v NZ at Wellington 2014 In this August 22, 2011 file photo, England’s captain Andrew Strauss (right) holds the Reliance ICC Test Mace and celebrates with his team after they won the test series against India 4-0 at the Oval cricket ground in London. Reuters  Selected Rankings Rank      Player                   Team     Points       Ave         HS  Rating  18         Ian Bell                  Eng         657        45.12       822 v Ind at The Oval 2011  21         Alastair Cook       Eng         633          45.90       874 v Ind at Kolkata 2012  26         Joe Root              Eng      610*           41.86       630 v SL at Lord’s 2014  29         MS Dhoni             Ind          604        38.77         662 v SA at Kolkata 2010  32         Matt Prior                Eng         583        41.00      745 v NZ at Auckland 2013  33         Rohit Sharma         Ind          578*!       56.87      578 v NZ at Wellington 2014  42         Murali Vijay             Ind          530*      35.24       569 v SA at Durban 2013  45         Ajinkya Rahane      Ind          513*!    47.37        513 v NZ at Wellington 2014  50         S Dhawan               Ind          475*!    48.54       475 v NZ at Wellington 2014advertisement  83         Gary Ballance          Eng         334*!    45.20      334 v SL at Headingley 2014  94         Sam Robson            Eng         305*!    42.75      305 v SL at Headingley 2014Bowlers (top 10) Rank      Player                   Team     Points    Ave         HS Rating   1           Dale Steyn            SA           898        23.01      908 v Pak at Johannesburg 2013   2           Ryan Harris          Aus         870!       22.56     870 v SA at Cape Town 2014   3           V Philander           SA           865        20.11      912 v Ind at Johannesburg 2013   4           M Johnson            Aus         844!       27.42     844 v SA at Cape Town 2014   5           Saeed Ajmal         Pak         787        27.46      855 v Zim at Harare 2013   6           Tim Southee         NZ          783        29.83      799 v WI at Kingston 2014   7           R Ashwin               Ind          744        28.50      808 v WI at Mumbai 2013   8           Rangana Herath  SL           739        30.51      838 v NZ at Colombo (PSS) 2012   9           Trent Boult           NZ          737*      27.45        767 v Ind at Wellington 2014  10=       Kemar Roach       WI          733!       27.04       733 v NZ at Bridgetown 2014                Peter Siddle           Aus         733        29.37      816 v Eng at Old Trafford 2013Selected RankingsRank      (+/-)        Player                   Team     Points    Ave         HS Rating  12         (-2)        J Anderson            Eng         731     30.36      813 v Ind at Edgbaston 2011  14         (-1)          Stuart Broad         Eng         719     30.43      783 v WI at Lord’s 201223           Ishant Sharma     Ind          548        37.56      671 v WI at Dominica 2011   26        Ravindra Jadeja  Ind          507*      26.30      570 v SA at Durban 2013   33        M Shami               Ind          422*!    29.48      422 v NZ at Wellington 2014   46        Ben Stokes            Eng         305*      32.80      311 v Aus at Sydney 2014   50        Liam Plunkett      Eng         286*!    36.67      286 v SL at Headingley 2014   73        B Kumar               Ind          203*      37.88      211 v WI at Mumbai 2013  118=     Chris Woakes       Eng         7*          96.00     8 v Aus at The Oval 2013 All-roundersRank      Player                    Team     Points         HS Rating   1           Vernon Philander   SA        376*/ !       376 v Aus at Cape Town 2014   2           R Ashwin               Ind      373*/           419 v WI at Mumbai 2013   3           Shakib Al Hasan   Ban        364           404 v Pak at Mirpur 2011   4           Mitchell Johnson    Aus         280        384 v Eng at Cardiff 2009   5           Stuart Broad          Eng         274          382 v Pak at Abu Dhabi 2012 ! Indicates career-highest rating* Indicates provisional rating; a batsman qualifies for a full rating after playing 40 Test innings; a bowler qualifies for a full rating when he reaches 100 Test wickets. – Courtesy: International Cricket Councillast_img read more