WATCH: Roma Shah from Surat wins two golds in world powerlifting championship

first_img Digital Desk First Published: 28th December, 2019 13:37 IST Last Updated: 28th December, 2019 13:37 IST WATCH: Roma Shah From Surat Wins Two Golds In World Powerlifting Championship Roma Biren Shah is a computer engineering student from Surat, Gujarat, who has won two gold medals in the ‘World Raw Powerlifting Federation’ (WRPF) 2019. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00Loaded: 0%Duration 0:00Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio TrackQuality LevelsFullscreenThis is a modal window. This video is restricted from playing on your current domain Error Code: PLAYER_ERR_DOMAIN_RESTRICTED Session ID: 2020-09-09:fa85150864152826d94c1c99 Player Element ID: video_player_5f58210609fa6 OK Close Modal DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreen Roma Biren Shah is a computer engineering student from Surat, Gujarat, who has won two gold medals in the ‘World Raw Powerlifting Federation’ (WRPF) 2019 held in Moscow. Roma has been playing on an international level for the past three years.Being the only female participant from India and having over 22 countries participating in the championships, she had to undergo intense training and change her diet to non-vegetarian. She has won two gold and two silver medals this year, and a total of eight gold medals and two silver medals in the past three years for India. Written Bycenter_img LIVE TV SUBSCRIBE TO US WATCH US LIVE FOLLOW US COMMENTlast_img read more

As cutdown day approaches, a look at top Raiders’ undrafted free agents

first_imgALAMEDA — Having spent nine years with ESPN, Jon Gruden knows a storyline.Before the Raiders got on a plane and left Winnipeg late Thursday night following a 22-21 exhibition win over the Green Bay Packers, Gruden took minor exception to a question about the latest “distraction” of playing out of the country on an 80-yard field.“There’s not as many distractions here as you think or anybody thinks,” Gruden told reporters. “Antonio Brown is doing fine. We’ve got a good, young football team. …last_img

Changing Stories at Saturn and Titan

first_img(Visited 28 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 News from the ringed planet and its largest moon shows scientists can’t keep their stories straight when trying to keep Saturn billions of years old.Saturn NewsAge of the rings:  First they were old, then they were young, now they are old again.  Mike Wall at Live Science claims that the “age of Saturn’s rings” has been “revealed.”  The revelation was not inspired, though: “Saturn’s iconic rings likely formed about 4.4 billion years ago, shortly after the planet itself took shape, a new study suggests.”  How, then, do they remain so pristine?  How do they keep from grinding down to dust?  How do they escape the constant bombardment of micrometeorites and atomic nuclei?  Sascha Kempf (U of Colorado) bases his judgment on the low particle count coming from the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) for which he is a prime investigator.  The extremely low hit rate (10-19 g/cm2-s-1) at 2 to 50 Saturn radii is “consistent with an old ring system,” he says – at least for the main rings.  The article did not address how the more ephemeral D, F, G, and E rings are maintained, or how the rings survive other destructive processes like sputtering, collisional spreading, gas drag, and sunlight pressure.  CDA only detects dust, not ions.  For a primer on Saturn’s rings, see a feature on Space.com.Tiny blip to moon factory:  A barely-visible lump at the outer edge of the A ring is causing some to imagine Saturn as a modern moon maker.  “A rebellious moon might have just popped out of Saturn’s rings,” Lisa Grossman wrote for New Scientist.  Cassini scientists saw a disturbance that has quieted down.  What does it mean?  If a tiny “weird object” popped out, it’s too small to see – less than a kilometer wide.  But they gave it the name “Peggy” anyway.  This object (if it exists) might grow into a moon, they say, but then again, it might have been destroyed in a collision.  They didn’t explain how a moon-growing process could go on for billions of years.  If material is being lost from the rings continually, why is there a finite number of small moons, and where does new material come from to replenish what is lost?Plasma in, plasma out:  Remarkably, most of the plasma in Saturn’s magnetosphere comes from the little geysering moon Enceladus, when its water gets dissociated and swept into the magnetic field.  That puts plasma in; what takes it out?  The plasma content appears to be nearly in a steady state.  An article on PhysOrg suggests that Saturn’s fast rotation sets up currents that sweep excess ions down the magnetotail.  The article did not address the question of how long the tiny Arizona-sized moon Enceladus could feed the giant.A hex on Saturn:  A beautiful color movie of Saturn’s north polar hexagon made the news on Dec. 4 (see JPL press release).  This atmospheric feature – unique in the solar system – is thought to form by standing waves in a jet stream, but there are mysteries.  The nearest analogy mentioned is the ozone hole at Earth’s south pole, but most such features are “notoriously turbulent and unstable,” atmospheric scientist Andrew Ingersoll said.  “A hurricane on Earth typically lasts a week, but this has been here for decades – and who knows – maybe centuries.”  The images are clear enough to see “small vortices rotating in the opposite direction of the hexagon,” some as large as Earth hurricanes.  A massive storm rotates at the center of the 220,000-mile-across feature.  The south pole has a similar vortex, but no hexagon.Titan NewsTitan swamped:  Titan is Saturn’s largest moon.  Keeping Titan old for billions of years requires erasing all the craters that should be there.  Only 11 have been found for certain; another 50 are “potential” craters.  Science Magazine tried various crater erasing theories.  Sediments from mountain lakes?  No; some craters are out in the plains.  Wind-blown sand from the dunes?  No; there’s no sand in the crater-free polar regions.  Cryovolcanoes?  Doesn’t explain why craters are in some regions and not others.  Methane rain?  Not fast enough to erase a large crater.  The latest theory is that Titan has a methane-soaked, swampy surface hundreds of meters deep.  Impactors would sink into the quicksand-like material, leaving no trace.  There are exceptions, like well-preserved craters in the Xanadu lowlands (Titan’s oldest terrain), that require some ad hoc reasoning to explain.  Maybe those craters were formed when the surface was dry, before the atmosphere formed.  It’s convenient that none of those theory-rescuing factors are observable, otherwise someone might think Titan is young.Glorifying Titan’s methane lakes:  Titan’s north polar lakes made news on two fronts.  For one, the radar mapper has a big enough composite picture to amaze viewers.  Simon Redfern at The Conversation gave a nice write-up and picture, with video clip, of the latest buzz.  See also coverage by the BBC News, New Scientist, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory.   The other news comes from Cassini radar’s chance to ping the depth of one of the large northern seas named Ligeia Mare.  Bounces from the bottom of the lake indicate it is 170 meters deep (like Lake Michigan) at most.  Surprisingly, its radar transparency suggests it is filled primarily with methane (CH4), not ethane (C2H6) as expected.  Though not nearly the global ocean once predicted, the lake is still a big container; nearby Kraken Mare is four or more times as large.  “The total volume of the hydrocarbon Titanic seas corresponds to around 300 times that of Earth’s oil reserves, in a celestial body smaller than Earth,” Redfern said.  (Titan’s diameter would just about cover the United States.) Space.com states the volume is estimated to be 2,000 cubic miles.Still, that much fluid falls far short of the global ocean predicted:Jeffrey Kargel, from the University of Arizona Tucson, pointed out that the presence of extensive methane seas and lakes at Titan’s north pole makes worse a long acknowledged deficiency of heavier hydrocarbons expected from models of Titan’s chemistry.  Among them are ethane, ethylene, propylene, acetylene and benzene – heavy hydrocarbons generated as sunlight causes chemical reactions in Titan’s soup of natural gas.(We’ve reported on the ethane deficit problem since before Cassini arrived at Saturn; search on Titan for entries.)  Another puzzle, though, is how smooth the liquid surface is.  Radar measurements show that there are no ripples higher than 1 millimeter.  That’s as smooth as the paint on your car.  This is surprising for a moon windy enough to form a belt of large sand dunes around the equator.Titan get-together:  The uncharacteristic size of Titan compared to all the other Saturn moons makes planetary scientists wonder how it got there.  Science Now addressed the puzzles that Douglas Hamilton [U of Maryland] is trying to answer:Titan is dominatingly big, having almost twice the mass of Earth’s moon and comprising 90% of the mass in orbit about Saturn. Titan is alone, orbiting in a million-kilometer gap bounded by tiny moons. And Titan’s orbit is odd: It is slightly elliptical rather than nearly circular and is tilted with respect to Saturn’s equator. With all those oddities, Hamilton said, “the biggest mystery is how it came to be in the first place.“Hamilton’s latest proposal is that several small moons got together to form the giant.  This would explain why there’s a gap.  Assuming tidal interactions affected the collisions, it would also explain the strange orbit.  To make it work, Hamilton has to assume the collisions were gentle, so the bodies would merge instead of splatter.  It’s also ad hoc; “even Hamilton acknowledges he’s not sure how he would ‘prove’ that he is right.”  How all that nitrogen and methane got into its atmosphere is for others to figure out.Futures:  Cassini has about 3 and a half more years to go before the end of its second extended mission.  Planned observations include more Titan mapping, an Enceladus plume fly-through in August 2014, shots of Enceladus’s north pole, high-altitude studies of the rings, and as much science as the limited fuel will allow before the orbiter’s death plunge into Saturn in 2017.  Having observed Titan since before its equinox, scientists are excited to watch for changes in the lakes and dunes as the Saturn system approaches northern solstice.  Will the lakes migrate from the north pole to the south?  Only time will tell.In my 14 years’ experience on the Cassini team, I had the opportunity to meet and talk with many of the scientists, and hear them lecture, including Sascha Kempf and Andy Ingersoll.  There is no question all the JPL scientists are extremely smart and talented at what they do.  They got a bus-sized spacecraft to Saturn after all.  They cannot see their bias, though, when it comes to dating things.  The Age of the Solar System (A.S.S.) is a Law of the Misdeeds and Perversions, which cannot be altered (from Daniel 6:8).  It’s not that these scientists are incapable of conceiving a younger age than 4.5 billion years, it’s that their brains have marinated in millions-and-billions language throughout their education and career, it never enters their minds to follow the evidence for youth honestly; the old age is a great Truth that they all Know.  I’ve heard one of them say that he was trying to make Saturn’s rings last for billions of years for “philosophical reasons,” implying that the idea of young rings was repugnant to him.Another factor is the “herd mentality” among scientists (see 12/09/13).  These scientists all know each other.  They meet at international conferences several times a year.  They give presentations to one another.  While there is some limited latitude for unique ideas that don’t stray from the A.S.S., there is no question that wanting to be liked and accepted by their peers is a factor in their behavior.  None of them wants to hear his esteemed colleagues call out “boo” or indicate disgust with an idea too far outside the paradigm.  This is how a consensus can form and persist despite powerful evidence against it.  No ad-hoc scenario is too bizarre to prevent a kick in the A.S.S.  And when you consider that youth of planets is often associated with the despised “young earth creationists,” none of them would ever dare to give aid and comfort to such “anti-science” outcasts.  Evidence be damned; long live the consensus!It appears hopeless to penetrate the dogma in this community, even if an individual here or there might be open to consider out-of-the-box ideas.  Probably it will take a younger community doing a better job of explaining things outside the paradigm, over time as the old graybeards fade away.  Meanwhile, we’ll keep reporting the news here, praising the good, pointing out the bad, and asking questions the paradigm never considers.Research projects: (1) Calculate the volume of Titan’s lakes and see if the production rate of ethane can account for it in 4.5 billion years.  Is there an upper limit?  (2) Calculate the output of plasma by Enceladus and infer the water emission rate.  What percentage of the moon’s mass would have to be ejected over 4.5 billion years?  (3) Considering the rate of dust measured by the CDA instrument, what would be the maximum age of the rings?last_img read more

Chancen: Kernbereiche

first_imgSudafrikas Wirtschaft strotzt vor Geschaftsmoglichkeiten, mit etlichen Bereichen, die als Zonen von besonders hohem Wachstums- und Investitionspotential identifiziert werden. Dies trifft auf die folgenden Bereiche zu:AutomobilindustrieSudafrikas Automobilindustrie ist gewissermaßen der Turbomotor fur die Herstellung und den Export von Fahrzeugen und Fahrzeugkomponenten. Die Branche zeichnet fur 10% der Produktionsexporte des Landes verantwortlich und ist somit eine wichtige Saule in der Wirtschaft des Landes. WeiterlesenAuslagernDa Unternehmen weltweit auf den zunehmenden Kosten- und Preisdruck reagieren, transformiert sich Sudafrika zu einem international bevorzugten Standort fur die Auslagerung von Geschaftsablaufen. WeiterlesenICT und ElektronikSudafrika, fuhrend in der Entwicklung von Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologie in Afrika, ist der zwanziggroßte Abnehmer der Welt im IT Produkt- und Servicebereich. WeiterlesenTourismusDurch Sudafrikas landschaftliche Schonheit, fantastische Landschaften, sonniges Klima, Kulturvielfalt und den Ruf, etwas fur sein Geld zu bekommen, hat es sich zu einem der gefragtesten Urlaubs- und Geschaftsreiseziele der Welt entwickelt. WeiterlesenLandwirtschaft und AgrarindustrieSudafrikas biologische Vielfalt, zusammen mit einer Kustenlinie von 3.000 km und bedient von sieben Handelshafen, kultiviert bevorzugt eine sehr unterschiedliche Bandbreite von Meeres- und Landwirtschaftsprodukten, von sommergrunen uber Zitrus- zu subtropischen Fruchten bis hin zu Getreide, Wolle, Schnittblumen, Nutzvieh und Wild. WeiterlesenBergbau und MineralienSudafrika ist ein fuhrender Produzent von Edelmetallen wie Gold und Platin, aber auch von Basismetallen und Kohle. Es ist der viertgroßte Diamantenhersteller, wobei Experten davon ausgehen, dass es immer noch potentielle weitere Vorkommen in Gebieten gibt, die noch nicht voll erschlossen sind. WeiterlesenChemieindustrieDie Chemieindustrie Sudafrikas, die alles von der Kraftstoff- und Plastikherstellung bis zum Pharmabereich umfasst, ist die großte ihrer Art in ganz Afrika und wird vom Staat als Hauptantriebsmotor des Wirtschaftswachstums gesehen. WeiterlesenSAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Yes, it is rocket science

first_imgSeen here during a class at Harvard,Siyabulela Xuza is one of the new younggeneration of Africans who are committedto developing the continent’s potential.(Image: Harvard School of Engineeringand Applied Sciences)MEDIA CONTACTS • Priscilla MoodleyNational Science Fair Director+27 11 894 1365 or +27 82 655 3605RELATED ARTICLES• Synthetic biology honour for students• SA pupils win World Literary Quiz• Fostering SA’s young scientists• SA women lead the way in science• Denel helps maths, science pupilsMediaClubSouthAfrica.com reporterEngineering whizzkid Siyabulela Lethuxolo Xuza is a young man with a big future.From the early days of experimenting with science in his mother’s kitchen in the poor community of Mthatha in the Eastern Cape, to international science and engineering accolades, he is now a role model for South Africa’s aspiring scientists.These days the darling of Nasa, who were so taken with him that they gave him a personal guided tour of their facilities, is the youngest member of the Africa 2.0 energy advisory panel.The pan-African organisation comprises the continent’s brightest minds and is committed to seeking sustainable solutions to challenges faced by Africans.In a March 2012 interview with US television network CBS, Xuza said that his current work is focusing on transforming homes into power plants “that capture the energy of the sun during the day and store some of it in fuel cells, for use at night”.Starting youngIn his own words, Xusa described the moment that sparked his lifelong passion for science.“I was chasing the roar of a Cessna plane dropping election pamphlets over Mthatha, my South African township,” he wrote on the America.gov website.“It was 1994, the first year of a new democracy in my country, and the sight of that technological marvel ignited in me a curiosity for science and a passion for using technology to engineer an African renaissance.”He was just five years old at the time. The youngster was also later inspired by South African entrepreneur Mark Shuttleworth’s trip into space in 2002, an event that was largely responsible for his long-standing interest in rocketry.His mother’s kitchen soon became the scene for much experimentation with formulations of jet and rocket fuel, but the informal laboratory had to be moved to the garage after a sticky incident with a too-hot stove.Xuza wasn’t deterred, and over the next few years he continued to work on the project, which culminated in the successful launch of a real home-built rocket, the Phoenix. This vehicle achieved a final height of over a kilometre and earned him the junior South African amateur high-powered altitude record.The rocket was propelled by Xuza’s own invention, a cheaper, safer type of rocket fuel, which became the subject of a project titled African Space: Fuelling Africa’s quest to space. It won a gold medal in the 2006 Eskom National Science Expo as well as a trip to the Nobel Prize ceremony in Sweden, where he presented his work to the Swedish king and queen.The same project took him to the 58th Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in Albuquerque, New Mexico, as part of Team South Africa.Here the project was entered in the energy and transport category and won the 18-year-old, then a matric pupil on a scholarship at St John’s College in Johannesburg, a Best of Category award and a First award.Xuza also received the honour of having a celestial body named after him by the MIT Lincoln Laboratory, which is replacing the complicated scientific names of thousands of minor planets with more accessible names in honour of the world’s top achievers.The minor planet 23182 Siyaxuza circles the solar system in the main asteroid belt near Jupiter and takes 4.01 years to complete a single orbit. It was discovered in July 2000.Xuza has garnered numerous other accolades, including a fellowship in 2010 of the African Leadership Network, and in 2011 he was made a fellow of the international student-run Kairos Society. Membership to this global body is by invitation only.A bright futureMatriculating in 2007 with a string of As, it was almost guaranteed that Xuza would take up further studies at a prestigious institution – that turned out to be Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, where he became one of just 1 948 students accepted out of about 28 000 who applied.He started his engineering degree in September 2008, but wasn’t afraid to take up academic challenges such as debating, the Mandarin language, and world music. These interests, he said, would broaden his mind.The young man from the Eastern Cape also joined the Harvard Forum for International Leadership, a society that brings together students from all around the world to discuss global issues such as HIV/Aids, terrorism and the development of emerging economies, as well as the need for efficient energy solutions.“I may not be able to predict what the future holds,” he wrote on www.america.gov, “but I am excited at how my engineering education will enable me to achieve my aspirations for Africa.”last_img read more

Business excellence to be recognised and rewarded at 5th South African Premier Business Awards

first_imgThe 5th South African Premier Business Awards will be hosted by the Department of Trade and Industry (the dti), in partnership with Brand South Africa and Proudly South African, on the 30 January 2018 at the Sandton Convention Centre.Deputy president Cyril Ramaphosa with past winners, the management team of Hazelton Pumps. (Image: SA Capital Equipment Export Council)Johannesburg, 22 January 2018 –  Members of the media are invited to attend the awards ceremony of the fifth South African Premier Business Awards where South African business excellence will be recognised and rewarded. The ceremony will be hosted by the Department of Trade and Industry (the dti), in partnership with Brand South Africa and Proudly South African under the theme Rewarding Business Excellence:DATE       :    Tuesday, 30 January 2018VENUE    :    Sandton Convention Centre, JohannesburgTIME       :    18h30Thirty companies will be vying for top honours in ten categories which include Black Industrialists Award, Manufacturer Award, Play Your Part Award, Proudly South African Member Company Award, SMME Award, Woman Owned Award and Young Entrepreneur Award. The awards are sponsored by Tsogo Sun, Old Mutual, Wits Business School and Johannesburg Stock Exchange.According to the Minister of Trade and Industry, Dr Rob Davies the awards recognise business excellence and celebrate enterprises that promote the spirit of success and innovation as well as job creation, good business ethics and quality.Journalists who will be covering the event are requested to RSVP by Wednesday, 24 January 2018 to Charles Mnisi via email: CMnisi@thedti.gov.za or telephone on 012 394 1721/072 523 4886 or Ntombi Ntanzi on Ntombifuthn@brandsouthafrica.com or (011) 712-5071/081 704 1488.More information on the South African Premier Business Awards, visit: www.sapremierbusinessawards.co.za or call 0861 843 384.To set up interviews, please contact:Ntombi NtanziTel: +27 11 712 5071Mobile: +27 (0) 81 704 1488Email: ntombin@brandsouthafrica.comVisit www.brandsouthafrica.comWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Diversity is the key to cover crops

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The most common use of cover crops among farmers is simply planting cereal rye after harvesting a cash crop in the fall. It is easy to plant just the cereal rye and be done, but cover crops are best used with a goal in mind.“You need to ask why you are planting it and what you want to accomplish from it,” said Rob Albers, the National Sales Manager at Center Seeds. “Diversity is a major component in being successful with cover crops. It adds more benefits than a simple monoculture stand.”An easy way to obtain a diversified cover crop is to use a mix of legumes, grasses, and brassicas. The legumes will produce organic nitrogen while the grasses and brassica scavenge nutrients and some brassicas are good for breaking up compaction. That combination will give a good stand, but an even better stand will have diversity within each of those three categories as well — several legumes, a few grasses, and a couple brassicas all in the same mix.To many, this type of mix can seem a little overwhelming. However, it is simple to accomplish and does not have to cost a fortune.“It’s the presence of the multispecies that’s important, not the poundage. Instead of drilling 60 pounds of straight cereal rye, you can break that up by putting in smaller amounts of cereal rye, oats, barley, annual ryegrass, winter peas, crimson clover, vetch, cowpeas, radish, and/or rapeseed,” Albers said.Diversification is proving to be increasingly important as the different root systems provide nutrients to the soil biology as well as absorbing different nutrients from the soil. Some roots will reach deeper into the soil profile whereas others will be more dense and fibrous, gathering nutrients from other parts of the soil. This is when the hyphae start interconnecting, which are important to extract nutrients to support growth in poor soils.Albers described this process as a spider spinning a web — the bigger their web, the more opportunity they have for food. That’s exactly what is happening under the soil surface when multiple plant species are grown together; the hyphae can extend for miles when they are receiving the proper nutrients from the soil and not disturbed by tillage.In order to figure out which combination would provide soils with the most benefit, the following questions need to be asked:• What will be planted next year? Some crops are more beneficial before a soybean crop and others before a corn crop.• Are there any herbicide issues or residuals? The cover crops to use may be limited or not even an option with the presence of residual herbicides.• In what time frame will the cover crops be planted? This will help decide if a warm or cool season crop should be planted and what crops will have the most benefit.Based on these simple questions, there is no general cover crop recommendation for every farm or every field. In a wet year like this, many people have started planting cover crops in July. Some warm season options for this early planting would be sorghum-sudangrass, pearl millet, Berseem clover, or sunn hemp as well as blends that include sorghum-sudan, radish, and sunn hemp or a blend with sorghum-sudan, sunn hemp, and buckwheat. Each of these can be seeded at a rate of about 15 to 20 pounds per acre, or even a little less, with a cost anywhere between $10 and $40 an acre depending on the seed and mixture.For later plantings in August or September, a few options would be annual ryegrass, cereal rye, spring oats, medium red clover, vetch, winter pea, radish, or rapeseed or a type of blend that includes some of those crops. The oats and rye will need to be planted a higher rate of 60 or more pounds per acre if they are not being mixed with another crop, and winter peas should be planted at a rate of 30 to 40 pounds per acre while the vetch can be planted at a rate of 10 to 20 pounds per acre. The other plants can be seeded at a rate lower than 10 pounds per acre. When these seeds are blended together, they can normally be planted at a lower rate of 15 to 20 pounds per acre and cost an average $10 to $45 an acre. Again, this is all depending on which seeds or mixtures are used.“To maximize the benefits, you have to know what you hope to accomplish with cover crops before planting them,” Albers said. “By adding diversity, you are simply increasing your odds of achieving those goals and seeing better results in your fields with cover crops.”last_img read more

4 hockey players killed in accident

first_imgFour national-level hockey players were killed and three injured when their car crashed into a tree on a highway in Hoshangabad district on Monday morning, said the police. “The players were travelling on the Itarsi road towards Hoshangabad to take part in the Dhyan Chand trophy tournament at 7 a.m.,” said M.N. Chhari, Superintendent of Police. Witnesses told the police the driver of the car, which was speeding, lost control and seconds later the car crashed into the tree and tumbled to the side near the Raisalpur village, added Mr. Chhari. “Several locals helped rescue the injured.” The deceased had been identified as Shahnawaz Hussain, Ashish Lal, Aniket Varun and Adarsh Hardua, all between 18 and 22 years of age. They trained at the Madhya Pradesh Hockey Academy, said the police. The injured had been admitted to the Narmada Apna Hospital in Hoshangabad, said Mr. Chhari. “The Chief Minister has announced a compensation of ₹2 lakh for each of the families of the deceased,” he added. Condoling the deaths, Chief Minister Kamal Nath tweeted that he prayed for the speedy recovery of the injured and “instructions had been given to officials for the complete treatment of the injured and every possible help to the families of the deceased.”last_img read more

Rep Chatfield announces March office hours

first_img State Rep. Lee Chatfield invites residents of the 107th House District to join him during local office hours throughout the month of March.“I am excited to host monthly office hours in each of the four counties I represent. It is important for me to meet face-to-face with residents and hear their concerns, answer questions and help them with issues involving state government,” said Rep. Chatfield, R-Levering.His office hours schedule is:Friday, March 13Mackinac CountyDriftwood Restaurant590 N. State St. in St. Ignace9-11 a.m.Chippewa CountyPure Country Family Restaurant11370 W. Main St. in Rudyard2-4 p.m.Friday, March 27Cheboygan CountyBig Boy Restaurant861 S. Main St. in Cheboygan9-11 a.m.Emmet CountyAlanson Depot Restaurant7568 US 31 in AlansonNoon-2 p.m.No appointment is necessary and there is no cost to attend. Anyone unable to attend may contact Rep. Chatfield’s office by calling (517) 373-2629, via email at leechatfield@house.mi.gov or through his website at www.RepChatfield.com. Categories: Chatfield News 03Mar Rep. Chatfield announces March office hourslast_img read more

UK pay TV operator BSkyB is likely to face growing

first_imgUK pay TV operator BSkyB is likely to face growing pressure from internet pay TV services over the next few years, according to ratings agency Fitch.In a note following Sky’s latest half-year results and the announced launch of a new online TV service, Fitch said that the broadcaster’s numbers, “while fully supportive of its current ratings, highlight the highly competitive nature of the UK market for triple-play packages of television, telephony and broadband services and the increasing pressure we expect the company to face from internet pay TV services in the coming years”.Referring to Sky’s new internet service, designed to target customers who do not want to sign up for a full pay TV service, Fitch said that “the company will have to balance this potential market against the need to ensure it doesn’t cannibalise its existing customer base”.While competition from OTT players could lead to pressure on content rights in the long term, Fitch said this was likely to be a slow process.last_img read more