POOR FARMERS AUCTION IN ARDARA PASSES €200,000 WITH ANOTHER GREAT NIGHT!

first_imgA fine ram is auctioned at last year’s event.The Poor Farmers Auction in Ardara has managed to raise another €17,870 – bringing the total money generated in the past nine years to more than €200,000.Everything from sheep to signed jerseys were auctioned at Teague’s Bar in the town this week at what was another hugely-successful and fun event.The auction has now become one of the highlights of the year in Ardara. This year’s theme was ‘Cowboys and Indians’ and many who turned up on the night wore fancy dress, adding to the craic on the night.The €17,870 raised this week was divided between the Killybegs Hospice Suite, Donegal Alzheimer’s branch and cancer Care West.Well done to al who took part on the night.   POOR FARMERS AUCTION IN ARDARA PASSES €200,000 WITH ANOTHER GREAT NIGHT! was last modified: December 31st, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:ArdaradonegalPoor Farmer’s AuctionTeague’s Barlast_img read more

Year-End Biomimetics Parade

first_img(Visited 46 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 What better way to end the year than a celebration of biomimetics, where fun and useful science never ends thanks to nature’s inspiring designs?We start with a new story with seasonal holiday appeal.Rudolph’s antlers inspire next generation of unbreakable materials (Science Daily). What’s the secret behind the toughness of deer antlers? They have to be light yet strong, able to endure male contests without breaking. In order to design tough materials like that, scientists at Queen Mary University had to do some basic science.The team looked at the antler structure at the ‘nano-level’, which is incredibly small, almost one thousandth of the thickness of a hair strand, and were able to identify the mechanisms at work, using state-of-the-art computer modelling and x-ray techniques.First author Paolino De Falco from QMUL’s School of Engineering and Materials Science said: “The fibrils that make up the antler are staggered rather than in line with each other. This allows them to absorb the energy from the impact of a clash during a fight.”Moth’s eye inspires critical component on SOFIA’s newest instrument (Phys.org). Who would have thought a moth’s eye could inspire a sophisticated wide-view camera on a spacecraft that can gather details with more sensitivity than ever before? Read about it here. “The idea is simple. When examined close up, a moth’s eye contains a very fine array of small tapered cylindrical protuberances. Their job is to reduce reflection, allowing these nocturnal creatures to absorb as a much light as possible so that they can navigate even in the dark.” Great idea.Mimicking biological movements with soft robots (Science Daily). Getting robots to move “organically” the way the human body moves fingers and arms has been a challenge. The folks at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering “have developed a method to automatically design soft actuators based on the desired movement.” Save a step; mimicking nature “streamlines the process of designing soft robots that can perform complex movement.”Artificial leaf as mini-factory for drugs (Science Daily). “Inspired by the art of nature where leaves are able to collect enough sunlight to produce food,” engineers at Eindhoven University of Technology envision nano-factories where sunlight can be used to synthesize a variety of useful drugs. They need look no further than plants, where “nature is able to” gather and use energy that human engineers have heretofore found too weak to get done what they want.First movie of energy transfer in photosynthesis solves decades-old debate (Science Daily). Speaking of photosynthesis, a new advance in high-speed images captures the moment when a chloroplast transfers energy to the reaction center. “The whole process takes a matter of nanoseconds (billionths of a second), with the individual steps of energy transfer and charge separation taking only picoseconds (trillionths of a second).” Match that, engineers. “Can we mimic it or tune it to make artificial photosynthesis more efficient? These questions, and many others, can now be explored.” Read about it in the open-access paper in Nature Communications. Bio-inspired self-shaping ceramics (Nature Communications). Isn’t it neat how some plant seed pods can explode on contact, releasing their seeds over large distances? They do it with turgor pressure differences that build up inside the pod. Here’s what Swiss scientists are thinking:Shaping ceramics into complex and intricate geometries using cost-effective processes is desirable in many applications but still remains an open challenge. Inspired by plant seed dispersal units that self-fold on differential swelling, we demonstrate that self-shaping can be implemented in ceramics by programming the material’s microstructure to undergo local anisotropic shrinkage during heat treatment.Rice husk solar cells? (Nature Scientific Reports). Believe it or not, the seemingly useless debris from rice farming is finding a new use in solar power technology. “The morphology, structure and texture studies confirm the high surface area, abundant active sites and porous structure” that scientists in China are investigating for use in the production of solar cells. There’s a lot of rice in China. Think of the possibilities.Jumping water striders know how to avoid breaking water surface (Science Daily). Korean scientists are excited about these bugs that walk on water, thinking that if they figure out how they do it, money could be made. Somehow, the bugs know how to avoid breaking the surface. The paper in Nature Communications ends, “The fundamental concepts presented in this study can also give a guideline to develop semi-aquatic robots that aim to emulate the superior locomotory abilities of the water striders on water.”Mimicking biological functionality with polymers for biomedical applications (Nature). The title is self-explanatory, but the first paragraph is worth reading. It emphasizes the rationale for biomimetics and why it is leading to a science gold rush:The vast opportunities for biomaterials design and functionality enabled by mimicking nature continue to stretch the limits of imagination. As both biological understanding and engineering capabilities develop, more sophisticated biomedical materials can be synthesized that have multifaceted chemical, biological and physical characteristics designed to achieve specific therapeutic goals. Mimicry is being used in the design of polymers for biomedical applications that are required locally in tissues, systemically throughout the body, and at the interface with tissues.Light-induced vesicle explosions to mimic cellular reactions (Phys.org). “Cells are the site of a multitude of chemical reactions, the precision of which is envied by scientists,” so Europeans are acting on their envy. They created artificial vesicles they can get to explode with light, releasing their content on demand. Basic science precedes application: “This research could have medical applications in the long term, but for the time being researchers are studying the possibility of releasing substances in a controlled manner within artificial polymer cells, in order to be able to reproduce and better understand some of the metabolic reactions of the biological cell.”Biomaterials: Sharks shift their spine into high gear (Nature News). Get into the shark cage and watch. “It emerges that a dogfish shark’s spine becomes stiffer as the fish swims faster, enabling the animal to swim efficiently at different speeds. The finding could also provide inspiration for the design of robotic biomaterials.” Too bad Kolman and Summers win SEQOTW for their ending statement:In an age of climate change and increasing environmental pollution, inventors are increasingly looking to nature for inspiration when trying to build clean and efficient machines. What better animals to choose than sharks, given that their capacity for movement has been refined over more than 420 million years of evolution?Last but not least, what good is a wolverine? Isn’t that a nasty, vicious animal you want to stay away from? Check this out:A wolverine inspired material: Self-healing, transparent, highly stretchable material can be electrically activated (Phys.org). Well, this one is not pure biomimetics. It’s only partly about wolverines that live in the forest. “Inspired by wound healing in nature, self-healing materials repair damage caused by wear and extend the lifetime, and lower the cost, of materials and devices.” That’s the biomimetics part. But Chao Wang at UC Riverside also engaged in what might be dubbed comimetics. “Wang developed an interest in self-healing materials because of his lifelong love of Wolverine, the comic book character who has the ability to self-heal.” Think of it this way. The comic book character wouldn’t have been conceived without natural knowledge that real organisms can and do self-heal, some better than others. Scientists are inspired to figure that out, too, by observing nature (10/15/16, 3/08/16). Humans may have lost some of that ability over time (4/06/16); maybe we can get it back.Happy New Biomimetics Year! The future belongs to design in nature. Let’s get the word out in 2017, and don’t let Darwin take credit (8/24/07).last_img read more

Arunachal Pradesh plans fixed-wing flight service to Mechuka, closest to China border

first_imgArunachal Pradesh will be inviting bids for a fixed-wing flight service to Mechuka, a small town in West Siang district ,with an advance landing ground (ALG) that is closest to the border with China.Also spelt Menchuka, the Buddhist-dominated Mechuka is perched 6,200 feet above sea level in the Eastern Himalayas and at an aerial distance of 29 km from the nearest point on the India-China border.“We would soon be floating a tender for operating nine-seater flights between Mechuka and Guwahati or Dibrugarh [Assam] or both. We did invite bids some time ago, but had to go for re-tendering because there was only one bidder,” Pasang Dorjee Sona, the frontier State’s honorary parliamentary secretary for tourism, told The Hindu at an event on infrastructure development in Guwahati on Monday.Fit for bigger flightsThe landing strip at Mechuka’s ALG, one of six the Defence Ministry had reconstructed, expanded and made operational by April last year, is 4,200 feet long. The Indian Air Force (IAF) controls this ALG as well as the other five – Tuting, Aalo, Pasighat, Vijaynagar and Ziro.In November 2016, the IAF successfully landed a C-17 Globemaster, a large military cargo aircraft that normally needs a longer runway at sea level, at Mechuka.“We want to test the waters with a smaller aircraft initially for a once-a-week flight. The frequency and size of fixed-wing aircraft can be increased depending on the response the service receives from tourists,” Mr. Sona, who represents the Mechuka Assembly constituency, said.The nine-seater flight service, to be handled by the State’s Civil Aviation department, is not part of New Delhi’s Udey Desh ka Aam Naagrik or UDAN scheme for regional connectivity.There is a twice-a-week helicopter service between Mechuka and Naharlagun, a commercial helipad near State capital Itanagar. But this service on Mondays and Saturdays is erratic because of unpredictable weather.Fixed-wing flights are considered better for negotiating cloudy and rainy conditions at high altitudes than helicopters.Mountain bikingMechuka is about 190 km north west of West Siang district headquarters Aalo. The road has not been in the best of shape, but the State government claims it will benefit from the 1,559 km Trans-Arunachal Highway (from Tawang in north-west to Kanubari in south-east) and branch projects.The difficulty in reaching Mechuka terrestrially, however, has been a boon in disguise for mountain terrain biking (MTB), Mr. Sona said.“MTB enthusiasts from all over have certified a 700 km stretch from Mechuka to Itanagar as the best track for mountain biking. We are focusing on this and other adventure sports such as white- water rafting in a big way,” Mr. Sona said.last_img read more

4 hockey players killed in accident

first_imgFour national-level hockey players were killed and three injured when their car crashed into a tree on a highway in Hoshangabad district on Monday morning, said the police. “The players were travelling on the Itarsi road towards Hoshangabad to take part in the Dhyan Chand trophy tournament at 7 a.m.,” said M.N. Chhari, Superintendent of Police. Witnesses told the police the driver of the car, which was speeding, lost control and seconds later the car crashed into the tree and tumbled to the side near the Raisalpur village, added Mr. Chhari. “Several locals helped rescue the injured.” The deceased had been identified as Shahnawaz Hussain, Ashish Lal, Aniket Varun and Adarsh Hardua, all between 18 and 22 years of age. They trained at the Madhya Pradesh Hockey Academy, said the police. The injured had been admitted to the Narmada Apna Hospital in Hoshangabad, said Mr. Chhari. “The Chief Minister has announced a compensation of ₹2 lakh for each of the families of the deceased,” he added. Condoling the deaths, Chief Minister Kamal Nath tweeted that he prayed for the speedy recovery of the injured and “instructions had been given to officials for the complete treatment of the injured and every possible help to the families of the deceased.”last_img read more

23 days agoParker delighted as Fulham thrash Reading

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Parker delighted as Fulham thrash Readingby Paul Vegas23 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveScott Parker was delighted with Fulham’s ferocious start in the 4-1 win over Reading on Tuesday.Parker’s Cottagers blasted three goals inside the opening half hour, with the hosts down to ten-men thanks to John Swift’s red-card.The win pushes Fulham up to fourth on the Championship table after 10 games.Speaking after the match, Parker said: “I was delighted with the performance.”I’ve been delighted with the performances over the past four or five weeks but the results have been missing a little bit.”That’s what most people usually look at and I understand that. But tonight, I thought that we were first class from start to finish.”In the first 30 minutes, we were devastating – even though they had a man sent off.”But, prior to that, I felt that we had really stamped our authority on the game and showed our quality.”We’re going to be a team very hard to deal with in the first 20 or 30 minutes. Even when Reading had 11 men, it was still difficult for them.”We moved the ball very quickly and with an intensity. And we were really clinical in the final third.”Over the past few weeks, we’ve worked a lot on getting that cutting edge about us.” last_img read more

MGM Resorts is MLBs official gaming partner after NBA NHL

first_imgNEW YORK — MGM Resorts has made its third deal in four months with a major U.S. sports league, becoming Major League Baseball’s official gaming partner in the U.S. and Japan.Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred said Tuesday that MGM will become an MLB-authorized gaming operator and will promote itself with teams and on the MLB Network, MLB.com and the MLB At Bat app.MGM in August became the exclusive official gaming partner of the NBA and WNBA, and the first official sports betting partner of the NHL last month.___More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_SportsThe Associated Presslast_img

US calls Chinas tariffs on American autos egregious

first_imgWASHINGTON — Three days before a U.S.-China summit, the top U.S. trade official is blasting Beijing for imposing “egregious” taxes on American-made cars.In a statement Wednesday, U.S. Trade Rep. Robert Lighthizer complained that China slaps 40 per cent tariffs on U.S. auto imports — more than the 15 per cent tariffs it imposes on other countries and the 27.5 per cent U.S. tax on Chinese auto imports.Lighthizer said the president had directed him to “examine all available tools to equalize the tariffs applied to automobiles.”The statement comes before a dinner meeting Saturday in Buenos Aires, Argentina, between President Donald Trump and his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping. The two leaders are expected to seek a resolution to a trade dispute between their countries that has shaken financial markets and threatened the global economy.Paul Wiseman, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Canbriam Energy announces second quarter production results and sale of Montney assets

first_imgCanbriam says that its Altares asset continues to deliver consistent performance with production during the second quarter averaging approximately 40,400 barrels of oil equivalent per day, 16 percent of which was liquids.The company reaffirmed 2018 production expectations of between 37,000 and 39,000 boe/d, which includes routine downtime related to summer drilling and completion activities. CALGARY, A.B. – Canbriam Energy announced on Tuesday that it has sold some non-core Montney lands in Northeast B.C. for $50 million.The company said that the assets had no associated production, and the disposition closed on July 30, 2018.“The disposition of non-core acreage supports the core development at our Altares Montney assets and the ongoing deleveraging of our balance sheet,” said Paul Myers, Canbriam’s President & Chief Executive Officer.last_img read more

City Council approves grant application for Festival Plaza

first_imgThis new space in Centennial Park aligns with the City’s strategic plan to use downtown as a social, vibrant hub. The City would like to start project tendering in March 2019 and begin construction in April with completion in September 2019. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – At the recent Regular City Council Meeting, Council approved the application to the Northern Development Initiative Trust for a grant to put towards the Festival Plaza.The grant worth up to $50,000 from the Northeast Regional Development Account would help add value to the work that is done shares the City Manager.The Festival Plaza will be located on the northwest corner of Centennial Park on the grounds next to 100th street and 96 Avenue. The Plaza will act as a visual entrance to the City of Fort St. John when travelling in from the south.last_img read more

The old fire hall approved for rezoning

first_img FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – At the Public Hearing held in the Council’s Chambers, the motion was approved to amend the zoning for the old fire hall.The zoning was being changed from Institutional to General Commercial to allow the site to be developed as mixed-use commercial office space on the bottom and residential above.The city property at 9407 Avenue sold for $625,000 to 1117731 BC Ltd company.last_img