QLD’s power streets revealed: where the state’s high flyers live

first_imgHedges Ave, Mermaid Beach, is regarded as one of Queensland’s ‘power’ streets.WELCOME to the Sunshine State’s power streets.These are the streets where some of Queensland’s wealthiest CEOs, celebrities and sporting legends own multi-million dollar mansions.From Olympians and billionaire business owners to property tycoons and former politicians. you know you’ve made it if you own a home in one of these exclusive addresses. Clive Palmer owns this beachfront home in Hedges Ave, Mermaid Beach.When it comes to power streets, the Gold Coast’s self-proclaimed ‘millionaire’s row’ Hedges Avenue needs no introduction — just deep pockets. The exclusive beachfront strip at Mermaid Beach is home to the likes of Clive Palmer, who paid $12 million for a five-bedroom mansion at 9 Hedges Ave in 2018 and Harvey Norman executive Steve Cavalier, who bought 213 Hedges Ave for a whopping $19 million in 2006. More recently, oil mogul Peter Mitchell sold an 810 sqm double block at 67 & 69 Hedges Ave to Village Roadshow CEO Clark Kirby and his former television presenter wife, Sara, for $10.3 million. Clive Palmer photographed on the Gold Coast. Photographer: Russell Shakespeare.Other high profile residents include Gold Coast businessman Jack Ray and his TV personality wife, Natalie Gruzlewski; former Tourism Queensland chairman Terry Jackman; and members of the Tristram family who founded the Tristram’s soft-drinks business.Mermaid Beach has a median house price of $1.585 million and is one of the most in-demand suburbs among potential home buyers, according to Realestate.com.au.Cohen Handler Queensland managing director and buyer’s agent Jordan Navybox said his clients wanted to live as close as possible to the “hotspot” of Mermaid Beach. Television presenter Natalie Gruzlewski and her husband, Jack Ray, own a house on Hedges Ave, Mermaid Beach. Image supplied.“Everyone wants to be in Hedges Ave — even if they can’t get into it,” Mr Navybox said.The equivalent power street on the Sunshine Coast would have to be Seaview Terrace in sought-after Sunshine Beach. A high-profile couple paid $17 million for a mediterranean style mansion in May this year, while breakfast TV host Karl Stefanovic and his wife, Jasmine, bought in the street for $3.6 million in January. Karl Stefanovic and his wife Jasmine have bought this house on Seaview Tce.Television and film producer Jude Bailey and Russian hemp trader Evgeny Skigin also own homes in Seaview Terrace, Sunshine Beach, which has a median house price of $1.54 million.Adrian Reed, director of Reed & Co Estate Agents, said it was no surprise that buyers loved Sunshine Beach — especially Seaview Terrace. “The elevation from the beach offers privacy and a sense of seclusion, and one of the most spectacular beach and coral sea views on the eastern seaboard,” Mr Reed said. Karl Stefanovic and Jasmine Yarbrough own a house in Seaview Tce, Sunshine Beach. Photo: Scott Ehler.In Brisbane, Aaron Avenue in Hawthorne is a magnet for the well-heeled, with mining magnate Gina Rinehart the owner of $18.5 million worth of house and land.Finance wizard Noel Whittaker also holds prime real estate in the street adn Goodlife Health Clubs co-founder Leon McNiece did until recently. Properties are also owned by a property developer, a lawyer and business identities. Gina Rinehart owns property in Aaron Ave, Hawthorne. Picture supplied.Also on the river, King Arthur Terrace in Tennyson made headlines late last year when Brisbane Broncos CEO Karl Morris sold his property in the street to Canstuct International CEO Rory Murphy for $17.6 million.The street is also home to the son of Super Amart founder John Van Lieshout. Place Estate Agents managing director Sarah Hackett is marketing a 10 bedroom, eight-bathroom Great Gatsby-style mansion at 121 King Arthur Tce owned by Mark Brodie, the former owner of Queensland takeaway-chicken chain, Brodie’s. Broncos chairman Karl Morris sold his home in King Arthur Tce, Tennyson, for $17.6m. Picture: Peter Wallis.Mrs Hackett said she had recently received an offer of more than $10 million for the luxurious riverfront estate, which had attracted interest from a number of successful “under-the-radar” business owners.“(King Arthur Tce) is a north facing street, it’s elevated and looks over the golf course,” Mrs Hackett said.“You could be anywhere in Queensland with that view, it’s just magical. This property at 121 King Arthur Tce, Tennyson, is owned by the founder of the Brodie’s takeaway chain, Mark Brodie.“People do pick streets just because usually they’re attracted to the similar type of homes there and the feel of it.“Quality neighbours are important too. With so many high-end sales in a street, you’re not going to overcapitalise if you invest there.” Sutherland Ave in the affluent suburb of Ascot has always been regarded as one of Brisbane’s most prestigious addresses. This house at 14 Sutherland Ave, Ascot, sold for more than $13m recently. Image: CoreLogic.With only 16 houses in the street, property records show some of the homes have been held by the same owners for more than 40 years.High profile residents include renowned fashion designer Keri Craig, Sentinel Property Group managing director Andrew Beaumont and Swissport vice president Glenn Rutherford who bought the former home of Domino’s Pizza boss Don Meij.The record sale price for the suburb was broken earlier this year when ‘Windermere’ at 14 Sutherland Avenue fetched $13.14 million. Coronis executive Craig Gillies is selling this house at 41 Sutherland Ave, Ascot.Down the road in blue-chip Hamilton, Dickson Terrace is the ultimate address.The street is famous for the extravagant mansion built by disgraced businessman Christopher Skase, which was bought by hotelier Steven Shoobridge for $10.13 million in 2018.The owners of uniform manufacturer, Weareco, fourth generation jeweller Margot McKinney and property developer, Anthony Barakat, also own mansions in the street. An aerial image of 36 Dickson Tce, Hamilton, which is the former home of Christopher Skase and now owned by hotelier Steven Shoobridge.In the same suburb, Harbour Road is home to fitness empire queen Lorna Jane Clarkson.An eight-bedroom, nine-bathroom masterpiece built for developer Don O’Rorke of Consolidated Properties at 33B Harbour Road is for sale. The statement residence, which is called Balaam, sits on a 1609 sqm block with 48m of river frontage and is for sale for offers over $6 million with Ray White New Farm principal Matt Lancashire. Fitness queen and entrepreneur Lorna Jane Clarkson lives in Dickson Tce, Hamilton. Image supplied.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus8 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market8 hours agoMr Lancashire is also marketing a home in the tightly-held Oxlade Drive in New Farm, which he regards as a definite ‘power street’, occupied by CEOs and old money families. The property for sale at 36A Oxlade Drive is one of just nine riverfront homes on the strip, with direct access to the boardwalk.“The last house that sold along there was in 2013,” Mr Lancashire said. This mansion at 33b Harbour Rd, Hamilton, is for sale.“It’s very prestigious… with generally larger blocks with direct river frontage and pontoons. It’s just unbelievable territory.“As soon as something comes up there, it is the talk of the town because it just doesn’t happen.“The prices along that strip could challenge Brisbane’s (house price) record.”Property records show the cheapest residential sale along Oxlade Drive was $5.6 million. Mr Lancashire said Teneriffe Drive in the neighbouring suburb of Teneriffe was also streets ahead of the competition.“It has some of Brisbane’s most exclusive homes, with city views, and only 1km from the CBD,” he said. This property at 36a Oxlade Dr, New Farm, is for sale. Oxlade Drive is sought-after street, with multi-million dollar properties.Mr Lancashire said demand for prestige property in Brisbane was stronger than ever, despite the impact of COVID-19.“The wealth at the moment is outrageous,” he said.“I’ve got seven active buyers looking to spend over $10 million. I’m talking to them every couple of days.“The stock in the top end of town is really tight. “I was nervous when COVID started, but now we’re having a party in the top end.” 4. Aaron Avenue, Hawthorne 6. Sutherland Avenue, Ascot 1. Seaview Terrace, Sunshine Beach 9. Oxlade Drive, New Farm 10. Teneriffe Drive, Teneriffe 5. Brisbane Corso, Yeronga center_img 8. Dickson Terrace, Hamilton QUEENSLAND’S 10 POWER STREETS 7. King Arthur Terrace, Tennyson 2. Hedges Avenue, Mermaid Beach 3. Harbour Road, Hamilton last_img read more

Can Liberia Answer the Agriculture Challenge?

first_imgYesterday the Daily Observer published an article quoting the Central Bank of Liberia’s 2014 Policy Statement which said that the only way for the Liberian Dollar to stabilize against the soaring US Dollar is for Liberia to produce goods for domestic consumption and export.  That same day, two things happened: the first was the grassroots campaign and advocacy organization One.org, along with some of Africa’s top music stars and with hundreds of African Civil Society Organizations who presented their “Do Agric, It Pays” petition to African leaders at the AU summit in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea, calling on them to recommit to spending at least 10% of national budgets on effective agriculture investments. The second thing that happened yesterday was a conversation with one of our readers who could not help expressing his utter shock and disgust over a photo (see above) he had discovered, suggesting some brutal truths about Liberia’s attitude toward agriculture. The image is a 2014 Google Earth photograph of the Guinean and Liberian sides of the border (yellow line) near Gbedin, the site of major rice project during the Tolbert administration.  To our reader’s dismay, he saw a series of organized parcels of land – agricultural developments – along the Guinean side of the border, while on the Liberian side, the image shows only forested areas and settlements, hardly any farming activity to speak of.  Agriculture activities along the Guinea side of the border are purportedly part of that country’s ‘Agriculture, Trade and Foreign Exchange Strategy: Organized Farms near Ganta and Gbedin’.“This is where a lot of our foreign exchange is going!” he exclaimed.  “The Guineans have learned that Liberians are not serious about agriculture, since our market women go there every week to buy produce with which to supply the Liberian population.  So [by establishing large farms right along the border with Liberia], they are drawing our foreign exchange into their economy, while we have government officials being named African Minister of the year and so on.”The man’s discovery of the Google Earth image of the Liberia-Guinea border could not have been timelier, with the African Union Summit was just underway in Equatorial Guinea.  There, One.org together with Nigerian pop star D’banj and other African musicians and CSOs hand-delivered their petition to several African Heads of State including Presidents Jakaya Kikwete of Tanzania, Yayi Boni of Benin, John Mahama of Ghana, Mahamadou Issoufou of Niger, and Macky Sall of Senegal. “It is time for our leaders to step up and Do Agric at this year’s summit during the AU Year of Agriculture. Millions of smallholder farmers are counting on you—including the over 2 million African citizens who have signed the Do Agric petition and the 400 million who live on less than a dollar a day,” said One.org’s Executive Director for Africa, Dr. Sipho S. Moyo, ahead of the summit.  Receiving the petition on June 10 in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, President Jakaya Kikwete promised to “champion this cause at the AU Summit. I will present this petition to the other Heads of State. We as African governments cannot succeed in taking agriculture forward unless we modernize it, instead of our people continuing to use the hand-held hoe and other farming implements from pre-biblical times.”Ghana’s President John Mahama accepted the petition in Accra, Ghana on June 20. He hailed the initiative and reiterated Ghana’s commitment to improving the lives of smallholder farmers, adding that “your campaign is preaching to the converted as we in Ghana are already stepping up the policies and investments in agriculture.”The Do Agric petition contains a bucket list of recommendations to AU members that, if adopted, could among other things boost yields for smallholder farmers and a reduced food import expense, which currently stands at about $25 billion annually. Africa could also benefit from increased food availability for the 265 million Africans who are under-nourished; increased intra-Africa trade benefits, estimated to reach $2 trillion by 2030; increased incomes for farming families through reduced post-harvest loss which today stands at $48 billion a year; and increased food production and agro-processing, providing millions of jobs for African youth.Noteworthy are Nigeria’s Coordinating Minister for the Economy Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, and Agriculture Minister Adesina Akinwumi, both of who also received the petition. ONE.org officially launched its “Do Agric, It Pays” campaign on January 20, 2014 along the margins of the 22nd Ordinary Session of the AU Summit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in support of the 2014 AU Year of Agriculture. The campaign encourages African governments to keep their 2003 Maputo promise to invest at least 10% of national budgets in agriculture, and makes a case for better strategic policies and transparent public investments that will better support smallholder farmers, especially women, and lift millions of Africans out of poverty. Well over 2 million persons have signed the Do Agric petition so far, totaling 97% of the target number of signatures.  “We came together because we know Africa is rising,” says Nigerian recording artist D’banj. “Yet the farmers who produce most of our food still struggle to survive. 70% of Africans are employed in agriculture. This week’s AU Summit in Malabo is a historic opportunity for you to change the lives of millions of Africans and create a better future for our youth through better agricultural investment.” Meanwhile, back in rural Liberia, smallholder famers are still desperately yearning for the support of the Agriculture Ministry and other relevant functionaries of government to come to their aid.  They are haunted every year by lack of technical support to improve and maximize their output; lack of means (roads, etc) to get their produce to markets; as well as funding needed for acquiring more efficient farming methods and equipment.  Even though the Central Bank of Liberia has made available some US$7 million to commercial banks to help farmers, the banks are requiring Monrovia-based land as collateral, which is essentially a non-starter for most small Liberian farmers. There are no quick solutions or easy answers, the Central Bank has already noted.  Over the last three years, the Bank reported, some of the country’s top agricultural exports – rubber and cocoa – suffered, contributing to the hike in the exchange rate.  Although 2013 saw a slight rebound in cocoa exports, there is a need for serious investment in mechanized farming to give Liberian cocoa (and coffee) the attention it needs on the world market.There are, however, noteworthy sprouts of hope. The newly established Liberia Collateral Registry is expected to count “movable assets” as acceptable collateral for commercial loans, essentially allowing farmers to bank their enterprises using their projected harvests as potential collateral.  There is also the phenomenon of school gardens gaining traction around the country, nurturing a renewed passion for planting, targeting Liberia’s youth.  The school gardens are effective because the students are fed at school from what they grow, thus learning discipline, diligence and pride in achieving good results alongside core agricultural skills.  With guided practice as well as deliberate investment and encouragement from government and relevant stakeholders, this could be the window of opportunity for fighting poverty in Liberia. Like the youth themselves, such opportunities will take time to mature.  And then, with hard work, only time will tell.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Musician Union of Liberia to Honor Anti-Ebola Song

first_imgIn an effort to recognize the meaningful and worthy contribution made by Liberian artists during the fight against the Ebola Virus, the president of Musicians Union of Liberia, Cecil Griffiths, has said that the union will honor some of its members for their role played in the fight against Ebola. He added that during the height of the Ebola crisis, anti-Ebola songs by Liberian musicians were instrumental in raising awareness. The artists who did these songs were for the most part self-supported and only a few were ever sponsored.“This honoring program is being planned to appreciate the artists for their level of work done in helping to eradicate Ebola from Liberia, he said, adding that the honor will come in two phases. According to him, the first phase will be awarded to individual artists who single- handedly sang anti-Ebola songs.  The second phase will be awarded to group songs.He disclosed that the honor will be extended on the basis of merit and for the amount of anti-Ebola songs an artist must have played over air during the Ebola crisis.  The program will meet international standards, he promised, and music videos will be previewed on stage prior to each award.He also indicated that the program is the beginning of many initiatives to be  undertaken by the Musician Union, designed  to support the industry.“We are still working on plans with the Ministry of Information, Culture and Tourism (MICAT) to use the Centennial Pavilion as  the venue, but full preparation has already been made for the program to be held on  May 30, 2015,” he explained.The Union welcomes  more support for the program, he added.An insider from the office of the Union confided to LIB Life that the song “Ebola is Real,” made by Deng, Soul Fresh and F.A,  will be awarded as an anti-Ebola song made by a group.  Other songs to be honored include “Hope Song,” produced by  Liberian Artists Together For Advancement (LATA).Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more