Two young people from Zagreb got a job in Feravin and decided to move to Feričanci

first_imgUnfortunately, it is no longer news that young people from Slavonia are moving out every day. But the news is when someone moves there for work, and it was this step that was decided by two young people who started their careers – no less and no more – than in Feričanci, a small town with about two thousand inhabitants.  It currently exports to 18 countries: Germany, Austria, Italy, France, the Netherlands, England, Ireland, Estonia, Switzerland, Poland, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Romania, USA, Australia, Mexico, Singapore and Japan. “This year, we exported the most wines to Germany, France, the Netherlands, the USA and Serbia. I am extremely glad that Frankovka Miraz and Frankovka Dika have been drinking in the distant Caribbean since this autumn, which we exported through our customer in the Netherlands. Exports account for a little more than 20 percent of our revenues, which is a good result considering that until a few years ago, our share of this segment was only three percent. We plan to increase the share of exports to 40 percent of total sales. ” pointed out Luka Vrga, a member of the Management Board of Osilovac, a company within which Feravino operates. “I am extremely happy to have been given the opportunity to work in the cellar and vineyards where it all actually begins. My days in Feričanci are full. After work, there is always time to hang out with dear people I met there, and Zagreb is only a two and a half hour drive away, so when I want it, I go on the weekends. “, says Lucija Kužir. Consumption of wine as well as knowledge about wines is an increasingly important part of the lifestyle in Croatia, including in Feričanci. Many wine regions and winemakers promote wine when guests visit wineries, including our winery in Feričanci. Photo: Feravino Photo: Julio Frangen And the fact that this winery takes care of young people is confirmed by the fact that since the beginning of last year, the professional team of oenologists has also been led by the young and promising Antonija Čema. Martin Kovačević, her fiancé, says that the fear of moving and the negative news spreading about emigrating from Slavonia quickly disappeared. “Already after the first few working days I was satisfied with my new job. From vineyards and cellars to selling wine, there is a lot of work, but I am very satisfied with the working conditions, and as a young technologist I see room for improvement. It is important for me to work in the profession. After all, I was educated for that, and I love my job very much. I am also delighted with Slavonia. Here the people are extremely hospitable, warm and cheerful. I like the serenity with which they radiate and live, as well as the richness of tradition and customs”, Martin Kovacevic points out. Photo: Martin Kovačević, Adela Grabež and Lucija Kužir, a team of young technologists from Feravin Feravina exports its wines to 18 countries around the world  Unfortunately, it is no longer news that young people from Slavonia are moving out every day. But the news is when someone moves there for work, and it was this step that was decided by two young people who started their careers – no less and no more – than in Feričanci, a small town with about two thousand inhabitants.  Feravin’s increasingly important business orientation is export-oriented. Namely, after graduating from the Faculty of Agriculture in Zagreb, twenty-four-year-old Lucija Kužir and twenty-five-year-old Martin Kovačević got a job at the Feravino winery as technologists. Lucija is from Zagreb, and Martin Dalmatinac from Polača, and they gained their first experiences in practice in California, one of the most famous wine regions in the world. Construction of a wine hotel is also planned  Exports account for just over 20 percent of our revenues- Luka Vrga, member of the Management Board Feravina vineyards cover an area of ​​165 hectares, and at the moment about 40 hectares of vineyards are in the phase of restructuring and new planting. The annual production is about 900 thousand liters, and in the vineyards are planted part of the indigenous grape varieties that have been found here since ancient times – Graševina, Frankovka, Zweigelt, as well as international varieties of white grapes (Pinot Blanc, Chardonnay and Rhine Riesling) and black varieties – syrah , cabernet sauvignon, cabernet franc, merlot and pinot noir. “The plan is to have sauvignon blanc on offer, for which vineyards have already been planted, thus following the trends of winemaking in the world. Most of the vineyards and attractive localities are located on the slopes of the Krndija mountain in the village of Feričanci, and some of the interesting locations are located in the vicinity of Našice. ” Vrga pointed out. With the possibility of wine tasting in the Old Cellar and wine shop, we offer our guests a tour accompanied by an expert oenologist, the past few years we offer vintage as a tourist program and every year more and more interested in this type of tourism. “In the long run, we plan to build a small hotel, restaurant and accompanying facilities, which will be realized in the next two to three years. This will strengthen the image of Feravin, but also Feričani as an unavoidable wine destination. ” concludes Vrga.last_img read more

Telford enters the 1m sq ft club

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Steve Ballmer, Clippers fixing L.A.’s neighborhood basketball courts

first_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error When the project is complete, basketball players throughout L.A. – as well as volleyball and badminton players, square dancers, bingo aficionados and all other visitors to these popular community spaces – might associate their favorite pastimes with the Clippers, whose logo is displayed on every court renovated with the Ballmers’ donation.“I do love those, I have to admit,” Zucker said. “The idea that at your court, where you are, your dream of perhaps one day playing in the NBA, or pursuing some other profession, when you see (the logo), I think it helps with reminding you of those dreams.”Recently, the teens and 20-somethings hustling back and forth over the center court “LAC” monogram during open gym at Jim Gilliam Recreation Center said they were thankful to everyone involved with restoring their neighborhood court. That job required replacing the faded, lumpy, twice-water-damaged surface with shiny new hardwood and new padding beneath it.“When I first saw it, all I said was, ‘Wow,’ ” Jamar Luttrell, 15, said. “And then I started playing on it, and now when you run and try to stop, you stop. You don’t slide like you used to.”It’s safer that way, but also in other ways, 22-year-old David Sharp said.“It’s good to finally get a new floor, finally give the kids a reason to come back and play in the gym,” said Sharp, who grew up playing in the Jr. Clippers youth basketball league in the facility, where he now coaches.“It’s important because I believe it keeps everybody out of trouble, keeps the smaller kids out of trouble, gives them a place to come here without having to worry about outside problems,” Sharp said. “After they come out of school, instead of going and doing something they’re not supposed to, they come in here and play, you know? Keeps ’em safe like it kept me from a lot of the outside problems that go on in just this community.”“This is a very at-risk community,” said Denise Stansell, senior recreation director, noting that just in the prior six weeks, three people had been killed in close proximity to the gym.“So to have them come inside, it’s a safe shelter, you know? It’s one way in and one way out, so if they’re gonna start some trouble, they know they’re gonna be caught.”Because the polished new surface is drawing young people inside, Stansell is serious about keeping it pristine: “No Food or Drink” signs are taped every few feet along the walls inside the gym.They guys playing pick-up games said they’re happy to honor the new rules, even to police themselves, though they’re not yet ready to switch their NBA loyalties – whether it’s to the Lakers, the Golden State Warriors or Kyrie Irving.Garcetti gets it.“As a lifelong Lakers fan, I told Steve, ‘I now root for the Clippers every single time they’re playing – except those times they’re playing the Lakers,’ ” the mayor said.Garcetti said the city has committed to the Clippers that, thanks to the team’s donation, it will be able to maintain all of the remodeled courts.“We were on a cycle, scraping together as much as we could each year,” he said. “This would’ve taken a couple of decades to do and (in the meantime) other courts would have been falling apart. So instead of us spending that money to fix 10 percent of the courts, we’ll be maintaining all of them.”Related Articles What the Clippers are saying the day after Luka Doncic’s game-winner tied series, 2-2 Kristaps Porzingis ruled out as Clippers, Mavericks set for Game 5; Follow for game updates Clippers vs. Mavericks Game 5 playoff updates from NBA beat reporters The gift was spurred by L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti’s goal of improving access to sports for children – especially girls – across the city ahead of the 2028 Olympic Games.Initially, he planned to recruit multiple donors to help finance the refurbishing of just L.A.’s indoor courts ahead of the Olympics, starting with a donation from the Annenberg Foundation to help restore gym floors at three L.A. city parks that needed it most. But the plan shifted after he reached the Clippers, who told him they wanted to fix all of L.A.’s courts.“It was a phone call from the Mayor’s office,” said Gillian Zucker, the Clippers’ president of business operations. “He called and laid out his excitement around all of the money that was being committed by the International Olympic Committee for the sake of sports programming for youth, and his belief that with that money, they were providing L.A. an opportunity to become the healthiest city in America – which was really exciting and inspiring when you have a vision that’s that big.”Especially for someone such as, say, Steve Ballmer.But before she filled in her boss, Zucker wanted to know more: How many courts, and where? Who would use them? PreviousClippers owner Steve Ballmer and his wife made a contribution last spring that will, by 2021, have covered the renovation of 343 basketball courts operated by the L.A. Department of Recreation and Parks. So far, at least 140 have been completed. (Photo courtesy of the Clippers)Clippers owner Steve Ballmer and his wife made a contribution last spring that will, by 2021, have covered the renovation of 343 basketball courts operated by the L.A. Department of Recreation and Parks. (Photo courtesy of the Clippers)Denise Stansell, senior recreation director of the Jim Gilliam Recreation Center, is serious about keeping the facility’s newly refurbished basketball court pristine: “No Food or Drink” signs are taped every few feet along the walls inside the gym. (Photo by Mirjam Swanson, SCNG) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsDenise Stansell, senior recreation director of the Jim Gilliam Recreation Center, is serious about keeping the facility’s newly refurbished basketball court pristine: “No Food or Drink” signs are taped every few feet along the walls inside the gym. (Photo by Mirjam Swanson, SCNG)“I do love those (Clippers logos), I have to admit,” Clippers president of business operations Gillian Zucker said of the logo that is emblazoned on all of the 140-plus courts the team has already helped refurbish in L.A. “The idea that at your court, where you are, your dream of perhaps one day playing in the NBA, or pursuing some other profession, when you see (the logo), I think it helps with reminding you of those dreams.” (Photo by Mirjam Swanson, SCNG)Clippers owner Steve Ballmer and his wife made a contribution last spring that will, by 2021, have covered the renovation of 343 basketball courts operated by the L.A. Department of Recreation and Parks. So far, at least 140 have been completed. (Photo by Mirjam Swanson, SCNG)Clippers guard Lou Williams speaks at the ribbon cutting for one of the basketball courts the organization has renovated for the L.A. Department of Recreation and Parks over the past year. So far, the work on at least 140 of the 343 that are part of the plan has been completed. (Photo by courtesy of the Clippers)Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti speaks at the unveiling of one of the Clippers courts that the team has paid to refurbish. “I was blown away,” Garcetti said of the Clippers’ $10 million donation to refurbish the 300-plus public courts run by the L.A. Recreation and Parks Department. “We’ve never had such a huge commitment in such a short period of time.” (Photo courtesy of the Clippers)Clippers owner Steve Ballmer and his wife made a contribution last spring that will, by 2021, have covered the renovation of 343 basketball courts (indoor and outdoor) operated by the L.A. Department of Recreation and Parks. So far, at least 140 have been completed. (Photo by Mirjam Swanson, SCNG)Martin Luther King Recreation Center’s coordinator Paul Nichols, left, facility director Eric Griffin, center, and recreation coordinator Haymen Gebru pose next to the facility’s new concrete basketball court, part of the project the Clippers are paying for. (Photo by Mirjam Swanson, SCNG)Clippers owner Steve Ballmer and his wife made a contribution last spring that will, by 2021, have covered the renovation of 343 basketball courts operated by the L.A. Department of Recreation and Parks. (Photo courtesy of the Clippers)Clippers guard Patrick Beverley works with some of the kids at the ribbon cutting for one of the basketball courts the organization has renovated for the L.A. Department of Recreation and Parks over the past year. So far, the work on at least 140 of the 343 that are part of the plan has been completed. (Photo by courtesy of the Clippers)Clippers owner Steve Ballmer and his wife made a contribution last spring that will, by 2021, have covered the renovation of 343 basketball courts operated by the L.A. Department of Recreation and Parks. So far, at least 140 have been completed. (Photo courtesy of the Clippers)Clippers owner Steve Ballmer and his wife made a contribution last spring that will, by 2021, have covered the renovation of 343 basketball courts operated by the L.A. Department of Recreation and Parks. (Photo courtesy of the Clippers)NextShow Caption1 of 12Clippers owner Steve Ballmer and his wife made a contribution last spring that will, by 2021, have covered the renovation of 343 basketball courts operated by the L.A. Department of Recreation and Parks. (Photo courtesy of the Clippers)ExpandLOS ANGELES — It’s fitting, Clippers coach Doc Rivers says, that the team with a roster full of gritty, lace-’em-up-and-go-play gamers would sponsor a program to refurbish all the public basketball courts in the city.“We call ourselves the ‘blacktop team,’ ” Rivers said. “So I think it connects that the blacktop team is refurbishing courts so kids can get outside and play on the blacktop.”With his wife, Connie, Clippers owner Steve Ballmer last year donated $10 million to the L.A. Parks Foundation for renovations at all of Los Angeles’ public basketball courts.“I met some of my best friends at the basketball court, even if they didn’t play basketball, so I feel like that’s important when it comes to growing up,” Clippers guard Patrick Beverley said. “It helps you stay out of trouble – and social media’s so big now, so getting out for a pickup game in L.A., that’s all you can ask for.” Less than a year after the project was announced, 142 courts are finished being fixed, said Kieffer, adding that all of them are expected to be completed before the stated three-year timetable is up.The organization will unveil an additional batch of “Clippers Courts” on Tuesday at the shared campus of University Pathways Public Service Academy High School (“The U”) and Charles Drew Middle School.The facilities include an updated gymnasium with a full-size indoor basketball court and more than 110,000 square feet of refurbished outdoor space, which includes 9-1/2 basketball courts, two volleyball courts, two tennis courts, two four-square courts, four handball courts, new garden space and a walking path, plus a new exterior paint job for the school gym.Garcetti said he remembers a visit from Connie and Steve Ballmer, who is reportedly valued at $41.2 billion, making him the wealthiest team owner in American sports, soon after he purchased the Clippers for $2 billion in 2014.The mayor said the Ballmers wanted to know how they might get involved in the city in a meaningful, long-term way. Still, he couldn’t have imagined such a substantial contribution.“I was blown away,” Garcetti said. “We’ve never had such a huge commitment in such a short period of time; we wanted to make sure it would get done.” In response, the Department of Recreation and Parks delivered a couple of “crazy enormous” binders, she said, detailing the status of every public court throughout the city, including all of the indoor wooden courts as well as those outdoors with asphalt or concrete surfaces.Each received an A, B or C grade determined by the amount of renovation needed, whether it was a court requiring just some sanding, repainting, sealing and staining, or one that needed to be entirely torn out and rebuilt.“We put it all together and I went over it with Steve,” Zucker said. “I said, ‘There’s a number of directions we can go. We can chip in to the level that other community members will … or we can do something disproportionate. Why don’t you take a look at the scope of this and let me know?’ ”The Ballmers took the materials with them on a flight.“And when they landed,” Zucker said, “he called me and said, ‘Let’s do them all.’ ”Connecting the dots between and youth sports opportunities and the successful pursuit of “the American Dream,” the Ballmers made a contribution last spring that will, by 2021, have covered the renovation of 343 basketball courts operated by the L.A. Department of Recreation and Parks.“This is so far and away the largest corporate donation to the city in many, many years, and certainly to the Rec and Parks Department altogether,” said Judith Kieffer, co-founder, special projects for the L.A. Parks Foundation, which is coordinating the multi-stage projects around the busy schedules at each community center, from Van Nuys to Sunland to South L.A.“And it’s been seamless working with the Clippers,” Kieffer added. “They knew their niche – its basketball, obviously – and we have all the public facilities in the city, so why not? Let’s make a match.” For Lakers’ LeBron James, Jacob Blake’s shooting is bigger issue than a big Game 4 victory Clippers hope they can play to their capabilities, quell Mavericks’ momentum last_img read more

Warriors’ Draymond Green spoke with Kevin Durant, dismissed long-term concerns

first_img Lakers, Clippers schedules set for first round of NBA playoffs AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersWant real-time Warriors news texted to your phone? Sign up for Mark Medina’s private text messaging service.The Warriors held a team dinner on Wednesday night, which is a typical practice on trips. Warriors coach Steve Kerr said he spoke to Green privately and to the team before Thursday’s morning shootaround. Though Kerr declined to share any details, he described the mood during shootaround as “pretty quiet.”When the Warriors opened up the end of morning shootaround to the media, Green and Durant appeared cordial and completed their shooting workouts at the same basket. Durant did not speak to reporters after morning shootaround and maintained a sullen expression as he sat on a bench and thumbed through his phone after his workout. But Kerr maintained he “feels extremely confident in this team’s ability to get through any adversity.”“I know the character of the group. I know the history of this group,” said Kerr, whose team has won three NBA titles in the past four years. “It’s way too strong and way too powerful to be upended by the type of adversity that can hit any team in this league. We’re going to get through this.”After all, the Warriors defeated the Rockets here in Game 7 of the 2018 Western Conference Finals before winning their second NBA championship in consecutive seasons. Green and Durant also had on-court arguments during his inaugural season two years ago. Lakers practice early hoping to answer all questions “I’ve read a lot about how ‘Is this the end of the run? Is it over. Did I ruin it? Did I force Kevin to leave?’” Green said, rhetorically. “At the end of the day, as I have said before, whatever Kevin decides to do, whatever Klay [Thompson] decides to do, we’ve had great years together. I support everybody whole heartedly 100 percent. As a man and human being, you have the right to do with whatever you want in your life. I’d never question that.”Green did question one thing, though. He dismissed any concerns on whether his verbal altercation with Durant would disrupt the team’s chances in winning its fourth NBA title in four years or convince Durant to leave next offseason when he plans to decline of his $31 million player option to become a free agent. One Warriors staffer walked out during morning shootaround and jokingly said within ear shot of reporters, “break it up; it’s all over.”“Nobody in this organization, from a player, not myself, not Kevin, not anybody else, is going to beat us. So if you are one of them 29 teams in this league, you gotta beat us,” Green said. “We are not going to beat us. We’re going to continue to do what we do. I’m sorry if that ruins everybody’s stories. I know everybody got a job to do. I apologize for ruining y’all stories, if it did. But if this only makes Kevin, myself, the rest of my teammates stronger, that’s what it’s going to do. You think you saw something before, good luck with us now. We’re not going to crumble off an argument. We’re going to move forward.”One way Green wants to move forward: not answer any more questions about anything involving his disagreement with Durant. Green delivered an opening statement for about two minutes on this situation, but declined to answer a follow-up question regarding the front office’s stance. The Warriors suspended him for one-game without pay because of Green’s language toward Durant. The Warriors then had a team discussion in the locker room, though the team said the substance of those conversations did not influence their decision to suspend Green.“Anybody want to talk about basketball?” Green said. “I spoke on what I spoke about, if anyone want to talk about basketball. I’ll take some basketball questions. But that’s all I’ve got to say about that.”Green spoke indirectly, though, on his basketball philosophy that determines when to be a playmaker, find an open teammate or pass to one of the Warriors’ top scorers in Durant, Stephen Curry or Klay Thompson. After Green grabbed a rebound in Monday’s game against the Clippers with six seconds left, he sprinted toward the other court and did not pass a trailing Durant after calling for the ball. Green also did not see an open Thompson before fumbling the ball as time expired.“Ball movement is always important, whether we got a matchup we like , whether a guy got it going, ball movement is always going to be important,” Green said in general terms. “Obviously there are going to be times you have to scrap that. A lot of times down the stretch, we scrap that. [Durant] is going to have the ball. Steph is going to have the ball. Klay is going to be finding his shot. A lot of times down the stretch, we scrap it. But throughout the course of the game, you want to have that ball movement and flow to keep everyone else in a rhythm and not allow the defense to key on those guys. Down the stretch, you have to go to your guys and they have to get you a bucket. That’s just a fact of the matter.”As for the ensuing argument between Green and Durant?Kerr maintained “it’s private” on how the Warriors determine when it is appropriate for Green to exert his fiery demeanor and when he crosses the line. But Kerr has long maintained Green’s on-court intensity and honestly provides more long-term and short-term benefits than consequences.“Draymond has a huge heart. He’s a champion. He’s a winner,” Kerr said. “He’s so passionate that at times he can go over the edge. He always comes back. I know he’s going to come back and he’ll be his usual competitive and passionate self. We’re going to move on.”Related Articles HOUSTON – Before anyone even asked a question, Warriors forward Draymond Green discussed the elephant in the room with the conviction and passion that matches his play.In his first public comments since Green and Kevin Durant had a verbal altercation at the end of regulation of Monday’s eventual loss to the Los Angeles Clippers, Green shared that he “spoke” with Durant and that “we’re moving forward.”Green did not directly address calling Durant “a bitch,” criticizing him for his pending free agency or his one-game suspension in Tuesday’s win over Atlanta. Green also did not address an ESPN report that said he plans to appeal the Warriors-imposed $120,000 fine for his one-game suspension. But with Green active for the Warriors’ game on Thursday against the Houston Rockets, Green generally defended his on-court demeanor with Durant. The tensions began after Durant yelled at Green for not passing him the ball after grabbing a rebound during a tie game with six seconds left before committing a turnover as the buzzer sounded in regulation.“There is no secret I am an emotional player,” Green said. “I play with emotions on my sleeve. I play with that same emotion. Sometimes it gets the best of me. If it doesn’t work in my favor, I’m going to live with it because it works in my favor to the good. That’s my resume. My résumé and the team résumé speaks to us more than it doesn’t So I’m never going to change who I am and I’m going to approach the game the same way it always do. We’ll continue to move forward.” How athletes protesting the national anthem has evolved over 17 years Trail Blazers, Grizzlies advance to NBA play-in game; Suns, Spurs see playoff dreams dashed How athletes protesting the national anthem has evolved over 17 years Trail Blazers beat Grizzlies in play-in, earn first-round series with the Lakers Trail Blazers, Grizzlies advance to NBA play-in game; Suns, Spurs see playoff dreams dashed Kerr appeared ready to move on by keeping his sense of humor. He joked he might filibuster his interview so no one asks any questions about Durant and Green. Kerr also joked that Rockets fans “might cheer” for Green during lineup introductions because of his spat with Durant. He dismissed whether this episode could strengthen the team, though, highlighting any other unpredictable events that could include injuries or personality conflicts.“I’m not going to sit here and pretend everything is rosy tonight and everything is going to be fine,” Kerr said. “This will unfold and we’re going to be fine and are going to be at full strength and we’re going to be ready to roll. But we’re human like everybody else. We have to deal with stuff. So we’ll deal with it.”And so far, Kerr said he likes how the Warriors have dealt with it.“The foundation is the key to everything,” Kerr said. “We have a strong foundation and that’s why we’re going to be fine.”Want real-time Warriors news texted to your phone? Want to get answers to Warriors questions? Sign up for Mark Medina’s private text messaging service.Follow Bay Area News Group Warriors beat writer Mark Medina on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.Related Articles Lakers practice early hoping to answer all questions Lakers, Clippers schedules set for first round of NBA playoffs Trail Blazers beat Grizzlies in play-in, earn first-round series with the Lakers Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more