COLÁISTE AILIGH’S AISHLING WINS UCD SCHOLARSHIP

first_imgHERE’S one very happy girl with proud parents and principal.Aisling Ní Bhraoin is pictured with her delighted parents after receiving an entrance scholarship from UCD.They are pictured with Micheál Ó Giobúin, Príomhoide , Coláiste Ailigh.  COLÁISTE AILIGH’S AISHLING WINS UCD SCHOLARSHIP was last modified: November 25th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Colaiste AilighUCDlast_img read more

Ohio’s Crop Progress — August 28, 2017

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Cooler than normal temperatures and dry conditions were unwelcome for most growers when moisture and warm weather could have helped with grain fill and maturity, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician for the 20 USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. There were 6.3 days available for fieldwork for the week ending August 27th, 2017. Soil moisture shortages grew as rainfall was fairly limited for most of the state. Effects of the extended dry period were evident statewide. Pastures and hay fields were turning brown, corn fired prematurely and some reports of soybean pods aborting were noted. Commercial vegetable harvest continued, and growers had more opportunities to harvest hay.Click here for the full reportlast_img read more

Beyond Sprawl: The Solar Suburbs of the Future

first_imgImagine a truly green suburb, one in which energy-efficient homes are powered by rooftop solar panels and electric cars glide quietly down the streets. Businesses, energy experts, and scholars say low-carbon suburban living is not only possible, but on its way, though not in the short run. Some glimpses of the future:— In Palm Springs, California, rooftop solar panels are standard in a new community of 42 energy-efficient homes built by Far West Industries of Santa Ana. The homes sold quickly, at prices ranging from $600,000 to $700,000. Scott Lissoy, president of Far West, says: “If we’re building in the Coachella Valley, which is one of the hottest areas in California, we’re building with solar panels. It’s the right thing to do.”— In Colorado, residents of Adams, Boulder, and Denver counties are taking advantage of a group buying program called Solar Benefits Colorado that offers discounts on solar panels from a company called Sunrun and on an electric car, the Leaf, from a local Nissan dealer. It’s one of a series of group procurement projects organized by Vote Solar, an advocacy group. Tax credits and state regulations also are importantThe economics of solar depend in part on federal investment tax credits of up to 30 percent for homeowners or for companies that install solar panels and lease them to homeowners — the most common home-solar arrangement today. But those credits are scheduled to fall to 10 percent in 2017 or disappear altogether. GTM Research expects a deep dip in solar installations in 2017 if the tax credits disappear.State regulation is key, too. In Florida — the Sunshine State — there is essentially no solar power industry because local utilities retain a monopoly on supplying electricity to homeowners. Some states have capped the amount of residential solar eligible for net metering, which allows homeowners to sell their excess electricity back into the grid and thus reduce their costs.“There is a lot of uncertainty right now with regard to the policies that have supported solar in the past,” says Laura Wisland, a senior energy analyst with the Union of Concerned Scientists.Despite the unknowns and unknowables, a growing number of investors and a few utility executives have come to believe that the electricity sector is undergoing dramatic change. “That the world’s energy system has begun a dramatic transformation to a cleaner, more local future is no longer a controversial statement,” says Michael Liebreich of Bloomberg New Energy Finance. Deutsche Bank published an exhaustive 185-page analysis of the global solar market that concluded: “We believe the solar industry is going through fundamental change and the opportunity is bigger than it has ever been before.”Not surprisingly, economics are the big driver. Solar panel costs have fallen sharply, and the so-called “soft costs” of solar that include marketing, installation, and permitting are declining as well, albeit more slowly. Instead of buying panels, most homeowners now lease them from solar providers like SolarCity, Sunrun and Sungevity or utilities, including Green Mountain Power and NRG Energy. “Leasing has been the game changer,” says Clint Wilder, a senior editor at Clean Edge, whose survey found that 82 percent of homeowners say “saving money” is the number one reason they buy clean energy products and services.Kelcy Pegler Jr., the president of NRG Home Solar, which now operates in 10 states, says: “The average customer is going to save from day one about 15 percent.” One company — CPS Energy, a municipally-owned utility in San Antonio — has even offered to pay select customers who agree to let a solar development firm install panels on their roof.Homebuilders, too, are slowly embracing solar. Six of the ten largest homebuilders make solar standard in some developments, according to solar provider SunPower. Lashing panels on a roof when a house is built saves money over installing them later, and the costs of solar can be rolled into a home mortgage.Cisco DeVries, the chief executive of Renew Financial, a California firm that finances solar and energy-efficiency projects, says the transition to an energy mix that is “decentralized, much cleaner and much more efficient” will come much faster than most people expect. Before the invention of smartphones, he notes, nearly every home in the U.S. had a landline; now fewer than 60 percent do. “The pace of change for distributed energy will start to look a lot like the iPhone revolution pretty quickly,” DeVries says. Electric cars have been a hard sellAnother key element of the solar suburb ecosystem — electric cars — has proven to be a hard sell. Back in 2011, President Obama called for 1 million electric plug-in cars (as opposed to hybrids like the Toyota Prius) to be on America’s roads by 2015. It’s 2015, and we’re not close: Cumulative sales are less than 375,000, reports the Electric Drive Transportation Association. Of the 16.1 million new cars and trucks sold in 2014, only about 118,000 (or 0.7 percent) were plug-in electrics, and sales this year are down slightly from 2014.As for batteries to store electricity at home, they are new and unproven. Last spring, Tesla set off a spirited debate among industry analysts with the announcement of its sleek Powerwall battery. Some said it won’t store enough electricity to run power-hungry appliances like air conditioners or clothes dryers, and at an installed price of $7,000, makes little financial sense for most people. Others said that in states with high electricity costs, batteries will enable solar owners to store power for the evening hours in a cost-effective way. Panasonic and Samsung are also developing batteries for the home storage, so Tesla’s Elon Musk isn’t alone in thinking there’s a business there.One reason why it’s hard to forecast the future of solar, electric cars, and batteries in the U.S. is that all are subsidized, and therefore policy-dependent, and not just at the federal level. Today, electric car buyers can take advantage of a $7,500 federal income tax credit, but the credit will expire once certain sales thresholds are reached. So electric cars could jump in price just as they become popular. Better batteries are a keyMeantime, an academic study of the city of Auckland, New Zealand, and its suburbs found that detached suburban homes can generate more than enough electricity than they need and send the surplus to the city in the batteries of electric cars driven by commuters. By email, Hugh Byrd, a professor at the University of Lincoln in the UK, who led the research, says another study found similar results for San Francisco.But, he added, realizing the clean-energy potential of suburbs will require, among other things, cheaper batteries with greater range to increase the market penetration of electric cars.And there’s the rub. For America’s sprawling suburbs to become environmentally friendly — let alone generators of excess energy — distributed solar power, electric cars, and battery storage will all have to become mainstream. That could happen — indeed, it probably will happen — but not in the near future.Across the U.S., distributed solar power — that is, photovoltaic panels installed on homes and businesses — is enjoying explosive growth, expanding by more than 50 percent annually for a decade, according to market researcher Clean Edge. SolarCity, the leading home solar company, says it aims to serve 1 million residential customers — up from 262,000 as of June 30 — by 2018, and it’s got plenty of competition.But distributed solar remains a niche business in every state except Hawaii, where 13 percent of residential electricity customers have installed solar. (California’s next, with 3 percent.) Nationally, about 734,000 homes — less than 1 in 100 — have on-site solar, according to GTM Research’s U.S. Solar Market Insight report. And a 2015 survey of U.S. homeowners by Clean Edge and SolarCity found that just 6 percent said they plan to install home solar in the next year, fewer than those preparing to buy LED bulbs, smart thermostats, and efficient hot-water heaters.(Some other countries, it must be said, are making far more progress. Germany, whose population of 80 million is one-quarter that of the U.S., has 1.5 million photovoltaic systems installed, twice as many as the U.S. Germany now generates nearly 7 percent of its electricity from solar power. In Australia, one in five homes now have photovoltaic panels.) Marc Gunther is editor at large of Guardian Sustainable Business U.S. and a blogger at MarcGunther.com. This post originally appeared at Yale Environment 360. RELATED ARTICLESSuburban Sprawl Costs a BundleNet-Zero Cities Aren’t Possible, You Say?Habitat for Humanity’s Net-Zero CommunityCalifornia Project Tinkers With a Net-Zero FutureVermont Utility to Develop New Grid TechnologyRunning Our House on Prius PowerCan We Power Our Car With the Sun?Tesla Will Sell Home BatteriesAn Off-Grid Solar CommunityA Net-Zero-Energy Community Near BoulderAn 11-Home Community Built for Energy EfficiencyGreen Neighborhood in North CarolinaSerenbe: a Green Town in the MakingEnergy-Saving Features of the Serenbe CommunityGiant ‘Geothermal’ Community in the Works — In Vermont, Green Mountain Power, the local utility, wants to sell its customers less electricity. Instead, it is selling them energy-saving heat pumps, weatherization, batteries, and solar panels that give them more control over their energy consumption. “Really, what we’re in the business of doing is trying to accelerate a consumer revolution that’s already happening, to transform the energy space,” says Mary Powell, the utility’s CEO.These examples point to the potential of what some are calling “solar suburbs.” The concept is a sweeping one — solar panels cover roofs, electric vehicles sit in garages, energy-efficient homes are outfitted with batteries to store electricity, and a smart two-way electricity system enables people to drive to work and discharge power from their electric cars at times of peak energy demand. The government of Australia has embraced this idea for a new military housing development being built near Darwin, where each home will come equipped with a 4.5 kW rooftop solar system, charging points for electric cars, and smartphone apps enabling owners to track their energy use and carbon saved.This vision bears little resemblance to the suburbs of today — with their big, inefficient homes, two or three gasoline-powered cars in the driveway, shopping malls, and vast parking lots. But advocates say that if all goes well, advances in technology, combined with smart policy, could lower the costs of solar power, electric cars, and batteries and drive a clean energy revolution in the suburbs.One evangelist for this revolution is David Crane, the chief executive of New Jersey-based NRG Energy, which aims to provide a complete clean-energy solution for homeowners, including electric-car charging and batteries. “Our home solar business is going to be about so much more about than just solar panels on the roof,” Crane said on a 2014 earnings call.Analysts at the Rocky Mountain Institute, led by Amory Lovins, also see an energy revolution coming. “The technical solutions are there,” says Titiaan Palazzi, a mechanical engineer at the institute who formerly worked for smart-thermostat company Nest. “You could eventually get to suburbs or communities that are net-zero energy.”last_img read more

Creating Opportunities > Qualifying Opportunities

first_img Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Now What if qualifying isn’t the most important thing you should be doing right now? What if you are supposed to be creating opportunities?Qualifying OpportunitiesWhat are your intentions when you are qualifying? If you still believe in the BANT process, you might be trying to make sure your prospective client has the budget, first and foremost. That isn’t always the best place to start a conversation, but then neither is starting the conversation with the question, “do you have the authority to make this purchase.”. These are different times, and they call for a different qualification process.Qualifying is still important, especially in low dollar, simple sales, where there isn’t a lot at risk. In more complex, more expensive, and more risky sales, this kind of qualifying isn’t very useful.The questions that you would ask to qualify don’t create value for your prospective client, and they don’t do anything to create opportunities.This is why SDRs and BDRs struggle.Qualifying has nothing to do with opportunity creation in sales where your prospects are known, targeted, and pursued over time. When your strategy is largely competitive displacement, you already know your dream clients are qualified. They’re already spending money with your competitor.The real challenge in sales now is opportunity creation.Creating OpportunitiesYour intention in above the funnel communication and when prospecting is to create opportunities.Your efforts at nurturing those relationships need to be built on creating a compelling case for change.The discovery meetings you have with your dream client are about exploring that change. You are going to qualify them as you determine whether you can create the requisite value and wether they are willing to make the investments necessary to change.It is more likely that your sales numbers aren’t what you need them to be because you aren’t creating enough opportunities than it is that you aren’t doing a good job qualifying.Opportunities are created by salespeople who are value creators and who have the business acumen and situational knowledge to help make the case for change. Opportunity creation is greater than opportunity qualification.last_img read more

Two BSF jawans killed in encounter with Naxals in Chhattisgarh

first_imgTwo Border Security Force (BSF) jawans were killed and another was injured in a gunbattle with Naxals in Chhattisgarh’s Kanker district on Sunday, police said.The gunfight took place in a forest near Mahla camp of BSF under Partapaur police station limits when a team of BSF’s 114th battalion was returning after carrying out an anti-Maoist operation, Deputy Inspector General of Police (Anti-Naxal Operations) Sundarraj P. told PTI.When the patrolling team was advancing through forest of Barkot village, located around 250 km from the State capital Raipur, it came under heavy fire from a group of Naxals leading to the gunbattle between the two sides, he said.After a brief exchange of fire, the militants fled into core forest, he said.Two constables identified as Lokender Singh and Mukdhiyar Singh, belonging to Rajasthan and Punjab respectively, were killed while another constable, Sandeep Dey, sustained injuries in the gunfight, he said.Reinforcement was rushed to the spot and the bodies of the deceased were brought to the headquarter of BSF’s 114 battalion in Pakhanjore, he said.The injured jawan was being airlifted to Raipur for further treatment, the DIG said.On July 9, two BSF jawans, belonging to the 121st battalion, were killed when Naxals had triggered an IED blast while they were on a bike patrol in the Chhotebethiya area of Kanker.last_img read more

23 days agoParker delighted as Fulham thrash Reading

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Parker delighted as Fulham thrash Readingby Paul Vegas23 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveScott Parker was delighted with Fulham’s ferocious start in the 4-1 win over Reading on Tuesday.Parker’s Cottagers blasted three goals inside the opening half hour, with the hosts down to ten-men thanks to John Swift’s red-card.The win pushes Fulham up to fourth on the Championship table after 10 games.Speaking after the match, Parker said: “I was delighted with the performance.”I’ve been delighted with the performances over the past four or five weeks but the results have been missing a little bit.”That’s what most people usually look at and I understand that. But tonight, I thought that we were first class from start to finish.”In the first 30 minutes, we were devastating – even though they had a man sent off.”But, prior to that, I felt that we had really stamped our authority on the game and showed our quality.”We’re going to be a team very hard to deal with in the first 20 or 30 minutes. Even when Reading had 11 men, it was still difficult for them.”We moved the ball very quickly and with an intensity. And we were really clinical in the final third.”Over the past few weeks, we’ve worked a lot on getting that cutting edge about us.” last_img read more

Shipping Industry Seeks More Progress on Cutting Emissions

first_imgzoom The global shipping industry has called on International Maritime Organization (IMO) Member States to give serious consideration to a joint industry submission regarding the need for further progress on addressing the sector’s CO2 emissions.The submission calls on IMO Member States to finalize the adoption of a global CO2 data collection system for international shipping, as a precursor to the consideration of possible next steps to address the sector’s CO2 emissions.Such steps could then build on the existing IMO mandatory agreement on technical and operational measures to reduce shipping’s CO2, which entered into force worldwide in 2013 – the first global agreement of its kind to be established outside of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), according to ICS.In particular, the industry associations will be requesting MEPC 70 to agree to develop a roadmap which would include a timeline for the completion of this important work, which the submission describes as determining a “fair share contribution” towards reducing the world’s total CO2 emissions, of which international shipping is currently responsible for about 2.2%.Made in advance of next week’s meeting of the Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 70) in London, the joint industry submission by BIMCO, International Chamber of Shipping, INTERCARGO, INTERTANKO and World Shipping Council, represents a unified response from the shipping industry to the Paris Agreement on climate change, which will enter into force on November 4.last_img read more

5 Days 99 Events 72 Films 3 Celebrity Chef Dinners 1 Epic

first_imgWOLFVILLE, NS, Aug. 22, 2017  – The world’s largest culinary film festival, Devour! The Food Film Fest (Devour!) today announced initial programming details for the seventh annual instalment. Celebrated chefs Jacques Pépin, Michael Smith, Bob Blumer and Mark Greenaway are joining previously announced festival Guest Curator, Canadian film icon Gordon Pinsent as 2017 participants.Devour! is the world’s largest film festival devoted to all things culinary. Each year, the festival showcases engaging cinema paired with extraordinary food and wine culture over five days in Wolfville, Nova Scotia from October 25 – 29, 2017. The seventh edition of Devour! is themed “A Celebration of Canadian Cinema and Cuisine” and will bring acclaimed filmmakers and chefs from across Canada and internationally. The festival features 99 events including 72 films in 34 screenings, 23 industry workshops, three celebrity chef dinners, 22 tasting tours, and 20 special events including dinners and parties.“In the span of just eight years, Devour! has grown to become a pre-eminent Canadian film festival and one of the most delicious events in this great country,” says Michael Howell, Executive Director, Devour! “We cannot thank our many partners and supporters enough, as they have shared our vision of becoming one of Canada’s must-visit festivals. We are grateful for the ongoing support of The Province of Nova Scotia and their invaluable commitment to helping the festival grow.” Advertisement The first round of tickets to the highly anticipated seventh edition of Devour! The Food Film Fest goes on sale Tuesday, August 29 at 10am AT. Tickets range in price from $10 to $999 for the exclusive Devour! The Festival Pass (limited quantities available). This all-access pass gives priority entry to the opening gala and all films, workshops, tasting tours, celebrity chef dinners, parties and special events. Devour! offers a round-trip shuttle from Halifax to Wolfville for $20.For additional information, visit https://devourfest.com/ Advertisement Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Login/Register With: Twitterlast_img read more

Tamara Taggart says shes in a puddle of tears after kindness shown

first_imgThis morning, the three most-read stories on Straight.com are all about CTV Vancouver’s decision to axe its popular 6 p.m. news anchors, Mike Killeen and Tamara Taggart.Since the story broke, the Straight website has heard from many commenters expressing their admiration for the two broadcasters.Many have also slammed Bell Media for dumping the pair, who’ve been the faces of its flagship program since early 2011. Twitter Facebook Login/Register With: Advertisement Late last night, Taggart tweeted that she “spent the day reading messages, texts, tweets and emails”.“I’m in a puddle of tears, overwhelmed by your kindness,” she wrote. “It’s been my privilege to have grown up with you the past 21 years. The love you have shown me is with me forever. xx” LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more