Ben Barba to fight lifetime ban

first_imgThe fallen NRL star presented himself to Mackay police and was charged with two counts of public nuisance over an incident at the Townsville casino in January.The former Dally M Medallist will appear in Townsville Magistrates Court on March 22.Barba reportedly will not face domestic violence-related charges because his partner Ainslie Currie has not made a complaint.Barba was sacked by NRL club North Queensland without playing a game for the club last month over allegations he was violent towards Currie in the incident.The NRL gave Barba a lifetime ban after viewing CCTV footage of the incident.But Barba’s lawyer Campbell MacCallum claimed on Tuesday he would now attempt to have the ban overturned.”He’s expressed his desire to play football this year,” MacCallum told reporters.”He wants to explore his options in relation to challenging the NRL ban and hopefully play rugby league in some sort of capacity.”I don’t think he’d play NRL but certainly local football, and that’s going to help his focus.”He’s feeling the pressure of the media on him – he’s also feeling the pressure of not being able to play the game that he loves.”It’s certainly pretty distressing for himself and a trying time for his family.”Barba was charged a day after telling a television news crew he had “lost everything” and threatened to “hurt” the reporter.North Queensland coach Paul Green said Cowboys welfare officers would keep in touch with Barba.”Our welfare guys continue to stay in contact with Ben. The club will continue to support him however we can,” he said.Green was not as expansive when told Barba intended to fight the NRL ban.Asked if Barba should be allowed to play again, Green said: “It’s probably not for me to comment.”Besides the two charges, Barba was on Tuesday also banned by Queensland police from entering Townsville’s entertainment precinct for three months.After winning a premiership with Cronulla in 2016, the star fullback copped a 12 game NRL ban for testing positive to cocaine for a second time.He left for stints in French rugby union and the English Super League before being offered a lifeline by the Cowboys, only to be sacked on February 1 over the casino incident.last_img read more

New AASM guideline recommends use of actigraphy for sleep disorders

first_imgJul 17 2018Actigraphy can be a useful clinical tool for the evaluation of adult and pediatric patients with suspected sleep disorders, including circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders, according to a clinical practice guideline from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM).The guideline, which is published in the July 15 issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, provides recommendations for the use of actigraphy in adult and pediatric patients with suspected or diagnosed sleep disorders or circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders. It includes seven conditional recommendations describing clinical scenarios in which clinicians can use actigraphy to help them understand a patient’s sleep habits across multiple nights. Additionally, one strong recommendation indicates that clinicians should not use actigraphy in place of electromyography for the diagnosis of periodic limb movement disorder.”Actigraphy is a clinical tool that has an important role in the assessment of certain sleep disorders, especially chronic insomnia and circadian-rhythm sleep-wake disorders,” said lead author Michael T. Smith, MA, PhD, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore. “Actigraphic devices are easy for children and adults to use at home, allowing clinicians to gather objective data across multiple nights to gain a better understanding of a patient’s typical sleep timing and duration.”Related StoriesMore than 936 million people have sleep apnea, ResMed-led analysis revealsSleep decline in one’s 50s, 60s increases risk of Alzheimer’s diseaseSleep disorders in patients with low back pain linked to increased healthcare visits, costsActigraphic devices typically are worn on the wrist or ankle for sleep assessment, and they use an accelerometer to record and integrate the occurrence and degree of limb movement activity over time. Mathematical algorithms are then applied to these data to estimate wakefulness and sleep. Potential benefits of actigraphy include its convenience, relatively low patient burden, longitudinal assessment capability, and relatively low cost.Developed by an expert task force and approved by the AASM board of directors, the guideline updated previously published practice parameters and was based on a systematic literature review, meta-analyses, and assessment of the evidence using the GRADE methodology. A draft of the guideline was previously made available for public comment.The systematic review focused exclusively on clinical grade devices approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. It did not cover consumer wearable devices, mobile apps, or other non-prescription devices directly marketed to consumers, which were the subject of a recently published AASM position statement on consumer sleep technology.”Actigraphy provides useful objective metrics across a variety of sleep-wake disorders in the setting of a comprehensive sleep evaluation at an accredited sleep center,” said AASM President Dr. Douglas Kirsch. “However, it is important to recognize that actigraphy is not a substitute for polysomnography when clinical circumstances require a more detailed evaluation of sleep.”Source: https://aasm.org/actigraphy-guideline-release/last_img read more