Low gas prices, warm weather pushing coal out of European generation market

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg:Cheaper natural gas prices this year are likely to cement Europe’s shift away from coal as a fuel for producing power.Abnormally mild winter weather has cut demand for the fuel as a flood of new supplies entered the world’s biggest gas market. That along with higher costs for carbon-emissions allowances has tilted the economics of generating electricity away from coal and toward using more gas.“Policy makers in Europe are now happy with such low natural gas prices,” said Ewout Eijkelenboom, senior consultant at the Netherlands-based industry adviser Kyos Energy Consulting. “It makes the coal phase-out easier than expected — it is almost a natural way of exiting coal.”Falling gas prices are a global phenomenon. Liquefied natural gas projects are pumping out record numbers of cargoes, cutting wholesale gas costs from the U.S. to Asia. That in turn has helped push down the cost of electricity across Europe, taking some of the heat out of the political debate about energy.Benchmark gas in Amsterdam plunged to a five-month low last week because of the global glut. Market rates for the coming summer are at the lowest since at least 2007. It’s especially notable that the weakness has arrived during the winter, which is peak-demand season.“We’ll need to do something with all that surplus gas,” said Elchin Mammadov, a European utilities analyst at Bloomberg Intelligence. “I’m expecting a further drop in prices and more coal-to-gas switching.”[Vanessa Dezem and Mathew Carr]More: Cheap natural gas is about to kick more coal out of Europe Low gas prices, warm weather pushing coal out of European generation marketlast_img read more

Davis doubtful

first_img Press Association Northern Ireland will wait for word from Southampton regarding the fitness of captain Steven Davis. The midfielder was withdrawn from his side’s win over Leicester on Saturday with a hamstring injury. The Irish have an appointment with Romania on Friday and issued a short statement on Sunday to update Davis’ position. last_img

Prisons Ladies handed GhS 5,000 Fine for Assault On Referee Bremansu

first_img Source: Ghana FA The GFA Disciplinary Committee has fined Prisons Ladies FC an amount of GHc5000.00 and has ordered the club to report the supporter who assaulted Referee Theresa Bremansu (on April 7) before the police station with jurisdiction for purposes of prosecution.Below is the Disciplinary Committee’s decision on the case. The full decision has been sent to Prisons Ladies FC:DECISION1. Prisons Ladies FC are fined an amount of GHC 5,000.00 payable within 14 days from April 24 2019, out of which fine an amount of GHC 2,000.00 shall be paid in compensation to Referee Theresa Bremansu.2. The Club is ordered to produce the assaulter identified as belonging to the Club within 7 days from April 23 2019 before the police station with jurisdiction for the purposes of prosecution.  The Club shall accordingly file to the GFA a written report of compliance with this order not later than May 2, 2019.3. The Club shall be liable to a further sanction of 2 home match ban in any competition of the GFA anytime from the date of this decision, upon failure to fully comply with the orders herein.4. On the player and team masseur (the accused) are acquitted and discharged on all counts. Though the Disciplinary Committee finds that their testimonies were not credible and full of inconsistencies, they are acquitted on procedural technical grounds particularly because of a patent defect in the charge preferred by the Prosecutor and also that it has not been proved beyond doubt that they were directly involved in the assault.That notwithstanding, the fact of the assault and the involvement of persons associated with the club is positively established by the evidence adduced before the Disciplinary Committee including documentary evidence by way of the exhibits and official reports.last_img read more

Seth Rogen’s Hilarity for Charity and Home Instead Senior Care Donate…

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Home Instead Senior CareMore than 130 families coping with Alzheimer’s disease will now receive much-needed support thanks to the Hilarity for Charity and Home Instead Senior Care Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care Relief Grant Program. Hilarity for Charity®, a movement established with the Alzheimer’s Association®, led by actors and writers Lauren Miller Rogen and Seth Rogen to inspire change and raise awareness of Alzheimer’s disease, announced the partnership with Home Instead Senior Care® to offer grants for in-home care services to eligible U.S. and Canadian families in October of 2014. Today, the first grants were awarded to Alzheimer’s families in need, totaling more than 6,000 hours of care.Grant recipients will be connected with a Home Instead franchise in their community, which provide a professional CAREGiverSM specially trained in how to most effectively and compassionately assist individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. Grants range from short-term grants of 25 hours to long-term care, based on the need of the family.“Sometimes, just a few hours a week can provide a welcome break for family caregivers,” explains Jeff Huber, president of Home Instead Senior Care. “Having the peace of mind that your loved one is being cared for by a highly-skilled CAREGiver can allow families to focus on the other areas of their life that they may have neglected since an Alzheimer’s diagnosis.”The Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care Relief Grant Program is funded by Hilarity for Charity donations, including the organization’s annual Variety Show fundraiser in which nearly $1 million was raised in 2014. To supplement this funding, United States- and Canada-based Home Instead Senior Care franchise owners pledged more than 37,000 hours of in-home care services, valued at $740,000. Individuals living in Canada or the U.S. and providing care to the nearly six million loved ones in North America living with Alzheimer’s disease are eligible to apply.For more information about the Alzheimer’s Care Grant Program, including how you can donate or apply for future respite care grants, visit www.HelpForAlzheimersFamilies.com.last_img read more

Ridge Road Run Opens the Door to Talking About Suicide

first_img“Irefuse to have what happened to Jack be for nothing,” she said. LITTLESILVER – Dawn Wilcox, an avid runner who has organized her fair share ofraces, said she realized just how different the inaugural Ridge Road Run forSuicide Prevention was going to be last year while helping out at the racepacket pickup the day before the event. Eulner,19, who just wrapped up his freshman year at the University of South Carolina, willagain serve as co-director for the race. He agreed it wasn’t until participantsbegan to arrive to pick up race packets at Road Runner Sports in Shrewsbury theday before the race that he realized the impact the race would have. While heassumed most runners would be local, Eulner said he was surprised by big groupsthat arrived from North Jersey and one man who showed him photos of hisgrandson who had died by suicide and who just looked like a “popular, normalkid who played football,” said Eulner. Thisyear’s race will be held at RBR in Little Silver – a few miles down Ridge Roadfrom last year’s setting in Rumson – Sunday, May 19 and will feature a numberof events, including a 5K, a 1-mile fun run and kiddie dash. Proceeds for thisyear’s race will benefit local organizations, designated by each high school,which Wilcox said helps benefit members of the community. Proceeds from the race will benefit mental health programs at the three organizing high schools and the Mental Health Association of Monmouth County. Forthose wishing to watch the race and cheer on the runners, the course starts infront of RBR and heads down Harding Road to Rumson Road, loops through HanceAvenue and Vista Drive before heading back to the high school on Rumson Roadtoward Harding Road. Organizersare hoping for better weather than last year’s race day, which was cold andrainy with a driving wind. But that didn’t stop all involved from feeling thewarmth of what they were doing. Helooped in students from nearby high schools – and tapped into Wilcox’sexpertise organizing races – to establish the Ridge Road Run, which was held inApril 2018 at RFH. “TheRidge Road Run was more than just a platform for suicide awareness andprevention,” said Lori Jarck, mom to Pierce, a junior at RFH at the time of hisdeath and member of the school’s lacrosse team. “It was a place where we couldremember and honor the lives of our loved ones who died by suicide.” “Wehad family members coming in and showing pictures of loved ones they had lostand telling us why this was so important to them,” said Wilcox, who organizedthe Little Silver 5K for 10 years and continues in her role as one of threedirectors of the Ridge Road Run. “It was so emotional and the energy was justso different compared to other races.” Participantscan form a team or join one of the over 30 teams registered for this year’srace, like #loveyoumorejackmoore, a group running in honor of Jack Moore ofFair Haven, a college sophomore who died by suicide in 2016, or Breaking theBarriers, in memory of Matawan teen Jordan Phillips who died by suicide inApril 2017. Studentsfrom Red Bank Regional (RBR), Rumson Fair Haven (RFH) and Red Bank Catholic(RBC) high schools came together last year to organize the Ridge Road Run aftereach school community was touched by suicide. What they thought would be a wayfor students to put aside rivalries and unite in showing support for thosestruggling with mental health issues and beginning a discussion about suicide,instead grew into a sizable race that attracted almost 1,500 participants andraised over $118,000 for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention andMental Health Association of Monmouth County.  This article originally appeared in the May 9-15 print edition of the The Two River Times. RBR junior Claudia Kelly, 17, Little Silver – who serves as race co-director again this year – said a number of people came up to her last year to say, “You don’t know how much this means to me.” Kelly, like most of the race’s organizers, had been touched by someone who struggled with depression and suicidal ideation and she wanted to do something that would give her peers an opportunity to start talking about it. Shrewsburyresident Michael Eulner was a senior at RBR last year. He was galvanized to dosomething to prevent another student suicide after seeing on social media howRFH students were impacted by the death of their classmate, Pierce Jarck, inOctober 2017. Mooresaid her mission since Jack’s death is to encourage open conversations aboutsuicide and the Ridge Road Run provides a platform to do that in a “verynon-threatening way.” But she thinks kids are more open to those discussions,which is important with all the stress and anxiety teens face and the addedpressures of social media. “We are a little snapshot of what’s going on in theworld today.” “I can’t change the past, but we can try to change the future,” said Phillips, whose son was a freshman at Matawan High School at the time of his death and a member of the school’s marching band. What’smost special about the race, according to Christine Moore – whose son, Jack,died by suicide in 2016 – was that students from three local high schoolsorganized it. “The kids embraced this on their own,” she said. “They didn’t doit because a grown-up told them it would be a good idea.” It’sthe stigma of suicide, Jarck said, that needs to be removed and people need tolearn how to talk about it, even though it can be difficult and uncomfortable. If you or someone you know has thoughts of suicide, there are people who want to help. Reach out to the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 1-800-273-8255 or Text HOME to 741741 to contact a trained crisis counselor. A confidential and anonymous helpline for New Jersey’s youth and young adults called 2nd Floor can be reached at 1-888-222-2228. LuannePhillips, whose son Jordan died by suicide in April 2017, will be at the raceagain this year and said she loved that the kids were the ones who organizedthe event and wanted to start the conversation. “It was reallyone of the most empowering days,” said Moore, Fair Haven, whose son Jack was 19and preparing to start his sophomore year at the University of Richmond when helost his battle with depression and anxiety. Reflecting on race day, she said, “Itwasn’t a sad day. I can’t stress that enough.” Get the 4-1-1 on the Ridge Road Run By Amy Byrnes The 5K race will kick off at 8:30 a.m., followed by a 1-mile fun run at 9:30 a.m. and a kiddie dash at 10 a.m. To sign up for a race, volunteer or make a donation, head to the Ridge Road Run website at ridgeroadrun.org. Describedby participants in last year’s race as “empowering” and “special,” this year’sRidge Road Run for Suicide Prevention is set for Sunday, May 19 at Red BankRegional High School in Little Silver and offers lots of opportunities toparticipate. Hesaid he thought, “This just can’t happen again,” and began talking to RBRadministrators and staff to see what he could organize to help shine a light onsuicide and mental health. As class president, he said he felt like he was in aposition to be able to create awareness throughout the Two River area. “Myson, Pierce, led a full, vibrant, loving and caring life and I hope that hewill be remembered how he lived and not how he died,” said Jarck. “The Ridge Road Run gave us the chance to outwardly and openly honor and remember our beloved Pierce.”last_img read more