Urban Forestry Restoration Project: Helping our Trees Help Us

first_imgFacebook2Tweet0Pin0Submitted by The City of LaceyThe Urban Forestry Restoration Project, administered by the Washington State Dept. of Natural Resources (DNR) Urban and Community Forestry Program, is an exciting opportunity to enhance the capacity of urban forests to manage storm water and improve air and water quality by improving the health and functionality of trees and forested sites in urban settings. Even more exciting is our opportunity to participate in this program here in Lacey at Lake Lois Habitat Reserve.A Puget SoundCorps team will work with City staff to remove the English ivy, Himalayan blackberry, Spurge Laurel, Scotch Broom and Robert’s Geranium from Lake Lois Habitat Reserve during the month of December. These invasive non-native plants prevent forested areas from providing our community the full benefits and services of healthy forests by competing for water and nutrients, and in some cases even killing trees. Many undesirable plants that grow in dense thickets also harbor rats and other vermin, creating a public safety hazard as well. Once the unwelcome plants are gone, native vegetation will be planted in its place.The Lacey Board of Park Commissioners approved the Forest Management Plan for Lake Lois Park and Lake Lois Habitat Reserve in September of 2012. Volunteers have been removing invasive plants and re-planting those areas with native trees to implement the recommendations in the plan.  Paul Royer, Chair of the Park Board states, “Many people are not aware of Lake Lois Habitat Reserve, but once they have been out to volunteer, they realize the importance of what they are doing and the difference it makes in the health of the forest.”To learn more about future volunteer opportunities, contact the Lacey Parks and Recreation Dept. at (360) 491-0857, or Lacey’s official website at www.ci.lacey.wa.us.For more information about the Urban Forestry Restoration Project, visit the Project online or contact Micki McNaughton at (360) 902-1637 or micki.mcnaughton@dnr.wa.gov. DNR’s Urban and Community Forestry Program is made possible through a partnership with the USDA Forest Service. Puget SoundCorps is part of the broader Washington Conservation Corps program administered by Washington Dept. of Ecology. Puget SoundCorps crews work on projects that help restore and protect water quality in Puget Sound. The Washington Conservation Corps is supported through grant funding and Education Awards provided by AmeriCorps.last_img read more

Sparky the Danger Bear, Shelton Electricity Adventurer, Returned to the Wild

first_imgFacebook66Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Mason County PUDSparky, the orphaned bear who took refuge in a Bonneville Power Administration substation last year, returned to the wild earlier this month.In October 2015, a frightened bear cub wandered into the utility sub-station in Shelton.“Folks really took to the little fellow,” said Joel Myer, spokesman for Mason County Public Utility District No. 3, the local utility that affectionately named the bear cub Sparky after he narrowly avoided electrocution. “We’re thrilled to hear Sparky is healthy and back home in the woods.”Last October, the frightened black bear cub entered BPA’s substation in Shelton, Wash., about 20 miles northwest of Olympia, and climbed on energized high-voltage electrical equipment. (Read Sparky’s backstory.)“That was a really close call,” recalled substation operator Bob Armanino, whose quick action to de-energize the equipment saved the bear’s life. “Hopefully, Sparky’s done touring power substations.”Sparky was lured out of the substation by donuts.Eventually, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife staff lured him out of the substation and into a trap with donuts. About a week later, he was taken to Idaho Black Bear Rehabilitation (IBBR) near Boise.“He weighed just 40 pounds when we took him in and was too young to take care of himself,” said center founder Sally Maughan.“He is a big, beautiful 178-pound bear now,” Maughan said.Sparky is now a healthy bear and has been released back into the wild.In preparation for his return to Washington’s Olympic Peninsula, Sparky was tranquilized, marked, tagged and given a health check. He was one of eight bears released by the rehab center on May 11.According to IBBR, more than 96 percent of the bears released successfully reintegrate back into the wild.last_img read more

SANTA MONICA STAKES QUOTES

first_imgTRAINER QUOTES MARTIN GARCIA, SWEET MARINI, SECOND: “She got a little bit tired. We were going pretty fast up front and when we got to the stretch the other horse just got by us today.” ELVIS TRUJILLO, SAM’S SISTER, WINNER: “It was the perfect trip. I knew there was going to be a lot of speed in there and I knew it would be fast early on. But I knew that sooner or later they would have to stop. She’s a nice filly. I knew Martin (Garcia on Sweet Marini) would stop; it was too fast for three horses head-to-head.” JOCKEY QUOTEScenter_img JERRY HOLLENDORFER, SAM’S SISTER, WINNER: “We got a 22 and 43 (fractions), so it makes it a little easier to close ground. We thought that might happen, but then when Dancinthenightaway kind of shook loose a little bit, it looked a little bit risky. But we were able to sustain and run her down in the end.“I’m just taking these races one at a time (when asked if she might stretch out). We thought she would run long (entered in Saturday’s La Canada at 1 1/16 miles, but scratched), but we thought this was a more advantageous race, so that’s why we went here.“We’ll take a look at a few different things (races).”NOTES: The winning owners are Mark Dedomenico of Belleview, WA; Jerry Hollendorfer of Point Richmond, CA; and George Todaro of Seattle. -30-last_img read more