Binnie climbing to the top

first_imgJamaica’s top-ranked squash player, Chris Binnie is on his way to joining the global elite of the sport. The Jamaica and Caribbean men’s squash champion for the last seven years, Binnie, 27, has also improved his Professional Squash Association (PSA) ranking to number 89 among the world’s best players as of this month, from 93 in March. This improvement came after he signed a one-year sponsorship agreement with JN Fund Managers Limited at the firm’s New Kingston office recently. “My goal is to be ranked as one of the top 50 players by December,” he said. “I believe I can do it.” The top 50 players form an elite of the sport, travelling the world to compete in the main events. Having a better ranking means the players get better placed in competitions and also have more options in choosing the competitions they find more attractive. Binnie has come a long way since April of 2012 when he had PSA ranking of 389. He progressed to a ranking of 131 by October 2013 joined the top 100 in November last year. Binnie’s optimism is also based on the success he is having with his new coach, Australian Rodney Martin, a former winner of the World Open Squash Championship who once ranked second in the world. Along with three other teammates, he has been going through a tough training programme to improve his overall match preparedness level, with his new coach. He said the sponsorship by JN Fund Managers would also help him achieve his goal. Based in Connecticut in the United States of America, he coaches at Trinity College in Hartford, and had been limited to playing matches mainly in North America. “This sponsorship allows me to go to more tournaments and select ones in Europe and Asia,” he said. “I need to take on the best players in the most competitive tournaments globally if I am to improve. And it requires funding to get to the matches and maintain myself while competing.” Brando Hayden, general manager of JN Fund Managers, said: “We admire what Chris Binnie has done for himself and for Jamaica. He has invested his time and talents, making him one of the top 100 squash players in the world. “We want to help him fulfil his dreams because his success will also pave the way for others,” Hayden said. Binnie himself launched the Jamaica Squash Association’s Grassroots Clinic to students of Papine High School and New Providence Primary School on March 20. And the programme at the University of Technology is noteworthy for the players who have emerged from that facility.last_img read more

More traffic chaos in Letterkenny on busy Friday

first_imgMotorists travelling around Letterkenny this Friday afternoon are advised to leave a lot of extra time for their journeys as roadworks create major delays in the town.Traffic is backed up on many of the main routes around the town due to roadworks on the N14 Four Lane and Pearse Road.Very heavy traffic is reported on Main Street Letterkenny, the N14 from the Dry Arch to Polestar Roundabout and on the Ramelton Road. A minor accident has also taken place on the Leck Road. This is expected to clear soon.There are also delays at works on the N56 at Illistrin, between Letterkenny and Kilmacrennan.It was a similar situation on Thursday evening last, as many motorists were left frustrated with long delays.Letterkenny is in its second week of major sewerage works on the Pearse Road, which has led to one-lane traffic on the route turning left off Paddy Harte Road. As a result, cars must travel down the already congested Lower Main Street to reach Oldtown. The Pearse Road project is expected to last for 10 more weeks, after which works will move to Oldtown Road in front of the Old Dunnes.More traffic chaos in Letterkenny on busy Friday was last modified: May 26th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

SA increases R&D spending

first_img1 June 2007South Africa’s spending on research and development (R&D) has increased by about R4.5-billion over the last five years, an indicator of the growing competitiveness of the country’s economy.Delivering his department’s budget vote in Parliament in Cape Town last week, Science and Technology Minister Mosibudi Mangena said the country’s target of spending 1% of gross domestic product (GDP) on R&D by 2008/09 was now “well within sights.”According to the latest Human Sciences Research Council survey of R&D spending, SA businesses, universities, science councils, government research institutes and non-governmental organisations spent R14-billion, or 0.91% of GDP, on R&D in 2005/06.This was up from R12-billion, or 0.87% of GDP, in 2004/05, Mangena said.Over the same period, the private sector’s share of R&D activity rose from 56% to 59%. “As our business sector engages in innovation and R&D, their returns contribute to economic growth,” the minister said. “We are delighted with this trend.”SA firms score for innovationEarlier this year, the Human Sciences Research Council released the results of the first official South African Innovation Survey – modelled on the survey used in all European Union countries in 2005/06 – showing that more than half of SA’s companies engaged in the development of new products and processes between 2002 and 2004.“Our rate of innovation is well above that of the European average of 42% for 2004,” Mangena told Parliament last week.According to the survey, SA companies spent in the region of R27.8-billion on innovative activities in 2004, representing about 2.4% of the total turnover of all business covered in the industrial and service sectors.While the bulk of this expenditure was devoted to the acquisition of new machinery, equipment and software, in-house research and development (R&D) expenditure accounted for about 20% of total innovation expenditure.“In addition, some 10% of successful innovators in industry received public funding for innovation activities,” Mangena said. “That shows that the funding programmes of government are having a penetrating effect in the private sector.”R&D incentivesThe Department of Science and Technology also worked with the National Treasury and SA Revenue Service over the past year to introduce enhanced tax incentives for R&D.“I must, however, report a concern that few business leaders appear to be aware of the new incentives,” Mangena said. “We urge businesses to carefully examine their production processes, correctly identify their R&D activities, and increase their investments further.”Mangena reported that the lion’s share of the department’s budget over for 2007 through 2009 – about R323-million – would go to developing South Africa’s human resources in science, engineering and technology.The department has also allocated R178-million to provide modern research facilities and infrastructure for the country’s research community.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Low-Road Buildings Are Homeowner-Friendly

first_img Start Free Trial Already a member? Log in This article is only available to GBA Prime Members There are at least two recognizable camps in the green building community. The older camp includes hippies, owner/builders, and those in the natural building movement. These builders prefer to scrounge materials from the woods or demolition sites rather than purchase new materials from a lumberyard. Their homes might be made of adobe, logs, or straw bales.On the other side of the aisle is the newer camp of builders who emphasize energy efficiency and high performance. This group includes fans of triple-glazed windows and heat-recovery ventilators, as well as builders who brag about their blower-door results. The Passivhaus adherents can be found on this side of the aisle.If you draw a Venn diagram of these two groups, you may find a few builders in the small zone where the circles overlap. But most green builders are outside of the overlap, falling clearly into one of the two large circles described above.The natural builders usually work in rural areas, while the high-performance builders often work in urban areas or suburbs. These two groups have contrasting attitudes toward building codes and regulations. While natural builders usually decry the stupidity of building codes, calling them roadblocks to creativity, the energy-efficiency group often promotes stricter building codes, noting that “we need to raise the bar.”In short, these two green building groups appear polarized. Perhaps the aims of the two groups are irreconcilable, and this polarization is inevitable. But even if the groups’ aims can’t be reconciled, it’s important for green builders to listen to each other.In 1994, Steward Brand, best known as the founder of the Whole Earth Catalog, wrote an influential book, How Buildings Learn. Brand observed that all buildings are destined to be modified — a fact that many architects forget — and that many… center_img Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details.last_img read more