Peanuts not likely at fault for spike in Salmonella -killed birds

first_img He said he has no suspicion that the rash of dead birds is related to the human outbreak. Keel said his lab tests birds that people find dead around their feeders and send in. The lab has tested “a couple hundred” since January—far more than the four or five that are sent in for testing in a typical year. To reduce the spread of Salmonella, the NWHC recommends cleaning feeders with a 10% solution of bleach in water, changing feeder locations regularly, and adding more feeders to reduce crowding. “We did do some strain typing, and our preliminary data indicate no relation” to the strain involved in the human outbreak, said Keel, who supervises the diagnostic service for the ongoing wildlife study. Burkmann Feeds recall news releasehttp://www.burkmannfeeds.com/index.php?tpl=recall Western Trade Group Inc. of Port Angeles, Wash., recalled roasted peanuts in February because they contained peanuts from Peanut Corp. of America, the firm blamed for the nationwide outbreak. The firm’s recall notice said the feed-grade peanuts had been sold to makers of livestock and bird feed in Iowa, Kentucky, Missouri, and North Dakota. Mar 18, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – Salmonella infections have been killing more wild birds than usual in the US Southeast this winter, but the increase does not seem related to the nationwide human disease outbreak tied to tainted peanut products, according to federal wildlife scientists. Western Trade Group Inc. recall noticehttp://www.fda.gov/oc/po/firmrecalls/westerntrade02_09.html “We don’t regularly get pine siskins; they’re typically a more northerly bird. Periodically they come down here. They move down in extremely dense flocks. It’s not uncommon to see Salmonella outbreaks among them,” he said. Like Keel, Ramsay said the reasons are unclear. “It seems like it’s a cyclical thing. Back in 1998 we had a large peak also, not only on the East Coast but also in the Midwest. It seems like every once in a while we get outbreaks that occur over a large area and in large numbers. We’re not exactly sure what causes that as yet.” M. Kevin Keel, DVM, PhD, of the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study at the University of Georgia in Athens said testing so far has shown that the birds have been dying of a different Salmonella strain than the one in the human outbreak. Pine siskins predominateKeel said most of the Salmonella-infected dead birds have been pine siskins and goldfinches, though some cardinals and other birds have died of salmonellosis as well. Salmonella is not uncommon in birds found dead around feeders. But this year it’s “really widespread,” and it’s not clear why, Keel said. In a Mar 11 press release about the recall, Wild Birds Unlimited said, “Initial tests have found no correlation between any bird deaths and the recalled food; a different strain of Salmonella was found in deceased birds in North Carolina than what we detected in the recalled food.”center_img “We really don’t know why this year has been much more extreme,” he said. “If it hadn’t occurred till the pine siskins arrived, we’d have thought it was them, but some cases occurred before they got here. They certainly are the dominant species affected now.” See also: “It seems from probably around Maryland down through Appalachia we’ve been seeing an increase in Salmonella,” he said. “It is Salmonella Typhimurium, and we see outbreaks of this type in birds every year, but usually not to this extent,” Keel told CIDRAP News. Salmonella Typhimurium is also the serotype involved in the human outbreak, but the bird strain does not match genetically with the human cases, he said. He said he was not aware of an unusual level of Salmonella-related bird deaths in regions other than the Southeast, with the possible exception of Washington state. A cyclical phenomenon?Nathan Ramsay of the US Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC) in Madison, Wis., said his center also has been seeing an increase in bird deaths related to Salmonella in the Southeast. Bird feed recallBurkmann Feeds, a Kentucky company, recently recalled 150 bags of bird feed after the North Carolina Department of Agriculture found Salmonella in one sample. In a statement, Burkmann said one of its peanut suppliers had sold the company some peanuts that were subject to a recall and had not informed the company. Ramsay, who is the lead necropsy technician at the NWHC, said the center has not run genetic tests on Salmonella isolates from birds this winter, but said “there doesn’t seem to be any connection” with the human outbreak. Salmonellosis is a common cause of death in birds at bird feeders, according to the NWHC. The pathogen can spread from bird to bird through direct contact or through food or water contaminated with feces from an infected bird or mammal. Infected birds may appear healthy but can shed the organism in their feces. Burkmann makes bird feed for Wild Birds Unlimited (WBU) franchise stores in the Southeast. The recalled peanuts were used in certain lots of Burkmann’s WBU Wildlife Blend and WBU Woodpecker Blend, the company said. The firm said it had recalled those lots and informed all the customers who bought the products. Mar 11 Wild Birds Unlimited recall news releasehttp://www.wbu.com/news/pressreleases/2009_0311_recall.pdf NWHC information on salmonellosis in birdshttp://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/disease_information/other_diseases/salmonellosis.jsplast_img read more

Murtagh earns Ireland thrilling win

first_img Murtagh’s efforts carried Ireland home by just one wicket, with a solitary ball to spare, in the ICC World Cricket League clash at Stormont after the Scots had looked set to snatch a vital victory. Ireland’s last pair needed nine from the last three balls when Murtagh suddenly changed the game by hitting Rob Taylor for a maximum down the ground and following up with another boundary. Ireland captain William Porterfield, who scored a century against England, carried on where he left off in Malahide by rattling up 62 from 64 balls with 10 fours. But he fell soon after the dismissal of his opening partner Paul Stirling (30) and Ireland struggled to recover the momentum. Former captain Trent Johnston did weigh in with 24 from 34 balls but it was not until Sorensen got to work, putting on 29 for the ninth wicket with Murtagh, that hopes were truly revived. It seemed over when Sorensen swung and missed after coming down the pitch to Machan, but Murtagh held his nerve. Scotland had sensed victory when the dangerous Max Sorensen had been stumped off the bowling of Matt Machan in the penultimate over after a match-changing 31. Prior to that Ireland had slumped from 95 without loss to 180 for eight in pursuit of 224, Majid Haq taking three for 26. The defeat means Scotland, who play Ireland again in their final game on Saturday, can no longer climb into the eight-team competition’s second qualification spot. They will have one last chance in a qualification tournament next year. Ireland, the leaders of the WCL, have already booked their place at the 2015 World Cup in Australia and New Zealand. Scotland posted 223 for nine from their 50 overs thanks largely to an unbeaten 91 from their South African-born captain Preston Mommsen. Although wickets fell at regular intervals, Mommsen shared in important partnerships of 60 for the fourth wicket with Calum MacLeod (21) and 44 for the ninth with Safyaan Sharif (26). Mommsen hit 10 fours in his 122-ball knock, holding the innings together after Machan’s promising start was ended on 27 by Sorensen. Somerset spinner George Dockrell, who struggled in the one-day clash with England earlier this week, was the pick of the Irish bowling with four for 24 from his 10 overs while Sorensen took two for 37. Press Association Tim Murtagh smashed a six and a four in the final over as Ireland ended Scotland’s hopes of automatic World Cup qualification with a dramatic win in Belfast.last_img read more