Community Youth Services YouthBuild Program Receives $1.1 Million Federal Grant

first_imgFacebook2Tweet0Pin0 Barbara WakefieldDevelopment CoordinatorCommunity Youth Services711 State Avenue NEOlympia, WA 98506(360) 918-7844bwakefield@CommunityYouthServices.orgwww.CommunityYouth.Services.org Submitted by Community Youth ServicesOnly two Western Washington non-profits were awarded federal YouthBuild grants to support academic and occupational skill training for at-risk youth.They were Community Youth Services of Olympia’s Thurston County YouthBuild, receiving the top amount awarded of $1.1 million, and Goodwill Industries of Tacoma, which got the same amount. This is the third time CYS has earned the award.CYS partners locally with New Market Skills Center to run the program focusing on youth getting their diplomas or GEDs as well as certifications in construction and other programs. Other local partners include South Puget Sound Habitat for Humanity and Homes First!, a local non-profit. YouthBuild has constructed and remodeled several homes serving low income families in Thurston County.Other Washington non-profits awarded are NorthEast Washington Educational Service District 101 in Spokane ($1.1 million) and Opportunities Industrialization Center of Washington in Yakima ($1.1 million).“Our YouthBuild program, launched in summer 2009, is a model for how tax dollars turn lives around. Nearly 120 young people have benefited in our program alone, and that has a ripple effect of success for their families and peers, proving that positive investments in youth benefit not only the youth themselves, but also society as a whole,” said CYS Executive Director Charles Shelan.“The YouthBuild program has demonstrated a record of elevating the opportunities and prospects for good, middle-class jobs for thousands of young people through this nation,” said acting Secretary of Labor Seth D. Harris. “These grants reflect our shared commitment to investing in the future of our nation’s youth and the belief that those investments will yield dividends for years to come.”The grants range from about $600,000 to $1.1 million each and will fund 68 YouthBuild programs in 33 states and the District of Columbia. The programs will help nearly 4,600 young people obtain the certifications and skills necessary to achieve economic self-sufficiency. Along with the programs funded today, the Labor Department now actively funds 247 YouthBuild programs around the country.For more information about the national grants, click here. For more information about Community Youth Services, contact Barbara Wakefield, at the number below, or at (360) 359-6229.last_img read more

Urban Forestry Restoration Project: Helping our Trees Help Us

first_imgFacebook2Tweet0Pin0Submitted by The City of LaceyThe Urban Forestry Restoration Project, administered by the Washington State Dept. of Natural Resources (DNR) Urban and Community Forestry Program, is an exciting opportunity to enhance the capacity of urban forests to manage storm water and improve air and water quality by improving the health and functionality of trees and forested sites in urban settings. Even more exciting is our opportunity to participate in this program here in Lacey at Lake Lois Habitat Reserve.A Puget SoundCorps team will work with City staff to remove the English ivy, Himalayan blackberry, Spurge Laurel, Scotch Broom and Robert’s Geranium from Lake Lois Habitat Reserve during the month of December. These invasive non-native plants prevent forested areas from providing our community the full benefits and services of healthy forests by competing for water and nutrients, and in some cases even killing trees. Many undesirable plants that grow in dense thickets also harbor rats and other vermin, creating a public safety hazard as well. Once the unwelcome plants are gone, native vegetation will be planted in its place.The Lacey Board of Park Commissioners approved the Forest Management Plan for Lake Lois Park and Lake Lois Habitat Reserve in September of 2012. Volunteers have been removing invasive plants and re-planting those areas with native trees to implement the recommendations in the plan.  Paul Royer, Chair of the Park Board states, “Many people are not aware of Lake Lois Habitat Reserve, but once they have been out to volunteer, they realize the importance of what they are doing and the difference it makes in the health of the forest.”To learn more about future volunteer opportunities, contact the Lacey Parks and Recreation Dept. at (360) 491-0857, or Lacey’s official website at www.ci.lacey.wa.us.For more information about the Urban Forestry Restoration Project, visit the Project online or contact Micki McNaughton at (360) 902-1637 or micki.mcnaughton@dnr.wa.gov. DNR’s Urban and Community Forestry Program is made possible through a partnership with the USDA Forest Service. Puget SoundCorps is part of the broader Washington Conservation Corps program administered by Washington Dept. of Ecology. Puget SoundCorps crews work on projects that help restore and protect water quality in Puget Sound. The Washington Conservation Corps is supported through grant funding and Education Awards provided by AmeriCorps.last_img read more

Seth Rogen’s Hilarity for Charity and Home Instead Senior Care Donate…

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Home Instead Senior CareMore than 130 families coping with Alzheimer’s disease will now receive much-needed support thanks to the Hilarity for Charity and Home Instead Senior Care Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care Relief Grant Program. Hilarity for Charity®, a movement established with the Alzheimer’s Association®, led by actors and writers Lauren Miller Rogen and Seth Rogen to inspire change and raise awareness of Alzheimer’s disease, announced the partnership with Home Instead Senior Care® to offer grants for in-home care services to eligible U.S. and Canadian families in October of 2014. Today, the first grants were awarded to Alzheimer’s families in need, totaling more than 6,000 hours of care.Grant recipients will be connected with a Home Instead franchise in their community, which provide a professional CAREGiverSM specially trained in how to most effectively and compassionately assist individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. Grants range from short-term grants of 25 hours to long-term care, based on the need of the family.“Sometimes, just a few hours a week can provide a welcome break for family caregivers,” explains Jeff Huber, president of Home Instead Senior Care. “Having the peace of mind that your loved one is being cared for by a highly-skilled CAREGiver can allow families to focus on the other areas of their life that they may have neglected since an Alzheimer’s diagnosis.”The Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care Relief Grant Program is funded by Hilarity for Charity donations, including the organization’s annual Variety Show fundraiser in which nearly $1 million was raised in 2014. To supplement this funding, United States- and Canada-based Home Instead Senior Care franchise owners pledged more than 37,000 hours of in-home care services, valued at $740,000. Individuals living in Canada or the U.S. and providing care to the nearly six million loved ones in North America living with Alzheimer’s disease are eligible to apply.For more information about the Alzheimer’s Care Grant Program, including how you can donate or apply for future respite care grants, visit www.HelpForAlzheimersFamilies.com.last_img read more

Sparky the Danger Bear, Shelton Electricity Adventurer, Returned to the Wild

first_imgFacebook66Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Mason County PUDSparky, the orphaned bear who took refuge in a Bonneville Power Administration substation last year, returned to the wild earlier this month.In October 2015, a frightened bear cub wandered into the utility sub-station in Shelton.“Folks really took to the little fellow,” said Joel Myer, spokesman for Mason County Public Utility District No. 3, the local utility that affectionately named the bear cub Sparky after he narrowly avoided electrocution. “We’re thrilled to hear Sparky is healthy and back home in the woods.”Last October, the frightened black bear cub entered BPA’s substation in Shelton, Wash., about 20 miles northwest of Olympia, and climbed on energized high-voltage electrical equipment. (Read Sparky’s backstory.)“That was a really close call,” recalled substation operator Bob Armanino, whose quick action to de-energize the equipment saved the bear’s life. “Hopefully, Sparky’s done touring power substations.”Sparky was lured out of the substation by donuts.Eventually, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife staff lured him out of the substation and into a trap with donuts. About a week later, he was taken to Idaho Black Bear Rehabilitation (IBBR) near Boise.“He weighed just 40 pounds when we took him in and was too young to take care of himself,” said center founder Sally Maughan.“He is a big, beautiful 178-pound bear now,” Maughan said.Sparky is now a healthy bear and has been released back into the wild.In preparation for his return to Washington’s Olympic Peninsula, Sparky was tranquilized, marked, tagged and given a health check. He was one of eight bears released by the rehab center on May 11.According to IBBR, more than 96 percent of the bears released successfully reintegrate back into the wild.last_img read more

Lacey Engineer Wins State Excellence Award

first_imgFacebook120Tweet0Pin0Submitted by SCJ AllianceQuoting Aristotle, “We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.”And that habit of excellence, cultivated over his decades-long career as an engineer, has earned Scott Sawyer a prestigious award from the state’s American Public Works Association (APWA).Scott Sawyer was presented the Roy Morse Award for outstanding technical and professional accomplishments in public works by the Washington state chapter of APWA. Photo courtesy: SCJ AllianceScott, a principal at SCJ Alliance, was presented the Roy Morse Award for outstanding technical and professional accomplishments in public works by the Washington state chapter of APWA. As the APWA state winner, he will now be considered in the National Top 10 Public Works Leaders of the Year Award.A graduate of California Polytechnic State University, Scott moved to Washington 17 years ago and has been in the industry for more than 25 years. “The opportunity to serve is what drives me,” Scott shared. “In my profession, I get to serve people, communities and my colleagues, all in the context of solving problems.” His work on the Port Townsend sidewalk tunnel reconstruction and downtown streetscape is a standout example of both his engineering acumen and people skills, and he considers it the most rewarding project of his career. “I was fortunate to develop a close relationship with the downtown merchants,” he said. “Working with them during design and construction ensured we followed through on our commitment to keep them viable during and after the project. I’m proud of both the friendships made and the work we did to refurbish the downtown core, while preserving its unique charm and historical significance.” From left: Kirk Holmes, Director of Central Washington Services at Perteet, Inc. , Scott Sawyer, transportation design manager at SCJ Alliance, and Debbie Sullivan, deputy director of Public Works for the City of Olympia. Photo courtesy: SCJ Alliance.When Scott heard the news of the APWA award, he said he was blown away …but his colleagues were not. “The people who do this work every day see Scott as a mentor and a leader in the field. This award honors his contribution not just to the work, but to the people who work alongside him,” said SCJ President Perry Shea. “There’s something special about being recognized by your peers.”SCJ is a nationally-recognized, multidisciplinary consulting firm specializing in civil engineering, transportation planning and design, environmental and urban planning, landscape architecture and design, and public outreach. The company, celebrating a 10 year anniversary this year, has grown steadily from three employees in one location, to a dynamic team of more than 80 employees in five locations: Seattle, Vancouver, Lacey, and Wenatchee, Washington and Denver, Colorado. The privately-held, majority women-owned firm recently expanded into the Seattle-area market and is the recipient of two top places to work awards in the last 12 months.last_img read more

Thurston County Nominated for SportsEvents Magazine’s 2018 Readers’ Choice Awards

first_imgFacebook6Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Experience Olympia & BeyondThurston County’s Sports Commission (Experience Olympia & Beyond) has been nominated for SportsEvents Magazine’s 2018 Readers’ Choice Awards. The awards recognize destination marketing organizations, host cities and sports venues who have hosted sports events that exceeded expectation.Great Northwest Athletic Conference Basketball Championships at Saint Martin’s University. Photo courtesy: Experience Olympia & BeyondThe news comes after a successful year of hosting the Great Northwest Athletic Conference’s (GNAC) basketball and softball championships for the second year in a row and helping to bring the Northwest Athletic Conference’s (NWAC) cross country championships to the region this weekend at Saint Martin’s University. Experience Olympia & Beyond, along with the help of local sports facilities, support sporting events by assembling bid packages, providing hospitality, sponsorships and referrals to local businesses.“We are honored to be one of five destinations in Washington State nominated for this award as it highlights the great collaboration and excellent sports venues we have in the region. Our team is working hard to bring even more sports events to Thurston County,” said Shauna Stewart, executive director of Experience Olympia and Beyond.SportsEvents Magazine Readers’ can vote here for their favorite destination in each state. Winners will be recognized with a Readers’ Choice Award and featured in the January 2018 issue. Voting ends Friday, November 10 at 10:00 a.m.last_img read more

Penrose & Associates Physical Therapy: Solutions to Pain and Alternatives to…

first_imgFacebook7Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Penrose & Associates Physical TherapyOne hundred-thirty people die every day from Opioid overdose and 2 million people a year have an Opioid use disorder. We need to engage in meaningful conversations about pain!Jennifer Penrose. Photo courtesy: Penrose & Associates Physical TherapyThere are real options for pain management besides pain killers and injections: CBD & other natural supplements, TENS units, acupuncture, meditation, yoga, physical therapy, massage therapy – just to name a few!Did you know that if you have chronic pain 6 months or longer your brain does start to change? In fact, this will sound odd but neuroscience research shows that the brain loses the ability to discriminate between right and left (called left right discrimination). In fact you can go to Graded Motor Imagery and test your own ability to discriminate left vs right. If you cannot get the answers accurate in 2 seconds and less than 80 percent accuracy the pain is starting to make some changes in your brain. This is something we can help with in physical therapy. Working on right left discrimination will decrease your pain and start to help with “re-setting” nerve pathways.Another successful method is a TENS (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation) unit.  The electrodes applied to your skin send electrical impulses along nerve pathways. These electrical impulses flood the nervous system, reducing its ability to transmit pain signals to the spinal cord and brain. The same electrical impulses also stimulate the body to produce natural pain relievers called endorphins. We can show you how to use a portable TENS unit safely and effectively.We believe in giving people options for pain management and we also want to help problem solve movements/activities that hurt and give you tips on how to move with less pain.  It is amazing when you learn the right exercises and how to move with less stress to the joints how much better you feel!  We are here to listen to what you want and find multiple approaches to solve that with you.CBD oil can help alleviate pain without creating dependency. Photo courtesy: Penrose & Associates Physical TherapyWhat is CBD? Cannabidiol (CBD) is a type of cannabinoid, a chemical found naturally in cannabis (marijuana and hemp) plants but it does not cause the “high” feeling often associated with cannabis. That feeling is caused by tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a different type of cannabinoid.How does CBD work? Everyone has a cell-signaling system known as the endocannabinoid system (ECS). CBD interacts with a core component of the ECS — endocannabinoid receptors in your brain and immune system.  Receptors are tiny proteins attached to your cells. They receive signals, mostly chemical ones, from different stimuli and help your cells respond. This response creates anti-inflammatory and pain-relieving effects that help with pain management.However, if you can’t eat grapefruit than you can’t use CBD. Go to drug.com to see if your medications interact with CBD and talk to your doctor and pharmacist.CBD does have an inverted horse shoe shaped response curve with increasing levels; so higher amounts is not necessarily better.  ou also want to make sure you choose a reputable company that does perform third party testing and ensures quality control and offers a certificate of analysis with each batch showing less than .3 percent of THC in the CBD product.One CBD oral product that we stock and recommend is through a company called Nutrametrix product named Cannabiquin. It is “full spectrum hemp oil” with 10 mg of CBD and Black cumin seed extract (Thymoquin). These two combined make a very powerful anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant.  Research has shown the two combined decreases inflammation by 7.7 times! The “full spectrum hemp oil” does allow for other natural CBDs and their benefits of relaxation and improved sleep to help you as well.If you are struggling with pain management then please reach out. If you want to have a FREE pain discovery visit to go over options like CBD topical and oral, Joint support: Glucosomine & Hylaronic Acid, Pcynogenol, Curcumin (Tumeric) & other products, TENS units or if physical therapy or massage therapy would be the right step schedule a FREE pain discovery visit with us!  Call us at 360-456-1444.  Penrose & Associates Physical Therapy.  1445 Galaxy Dr. NE Suite 301 Lacey, WA  98516.  www.penrosept.com.last_img read more

Sanju Samson called in as replacement for injured Shikhar Dhawan for West Indies T20I…

first_imgAdvertisement 6urzNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs112bjmWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E9lcrju4( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 10q5rWould you ever consider trying this?😱ajgd6zCan your students do this? 🌚e9vjRoller skating! Powered by Firework Now that Shikhar Dhawan is out due to injuries, Sanju Samson will be replacing him in the next Test match against West Indies. Shikhar Dhawan got injured during his last game against Maharashtra at the Syed Mushtaq Ali Trophy Championship, which resulted in a deep cut on his knee. His injury has given Sanju Samson the opportunity to be on the field. The wicketkeeper, as well as batsman, was confined to the bench during the match between India and Bangladesh.Advertisement Shikhar’s performance during India vs. Bangladesh match was very poor. He scored 41, 31, and 19, which is nothing impressive. But he is to be a part of the team for the ODI series that is to kickstart from December 6.Advertisement On the other hand, Sanju had an impressive performance in the domestic matches, especially at the Vijay Hazare Trophy, where he scored a double century in  50 overs. He was made a part of the India team for the T20I series against Bangladesh due to his impressive run, but unfortunately, he did not have the chance to step on the grounds. He was not chosen for the ODI series, but luck favored him, and now the player is back on the team as a replacement!Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more

Lunch Break Looks to Expand RB Facilities

first_imgRED BANK – Lunch Break is looking to expand.The soup kitchen and food panty, which has been providing food, clothing and the wherewithal for those in need in Red Bank and the surrounding area for nearly 30 years, is seeking borough approval to expand its facility. The organization is looking to build an addition on adjacent properties because of what its executive director said is an increasing need for its services.“We’ve definitely outgrown the space,” said Gwendolyn Love, “even for what we’re doing now.”Love sat at a table in the 121 Drs. James Parker Blvd. facility during lunchtime on Aug. 30 as volunteers and employees worked and moved briskly, serving lunch to the crowd.As she discussed the need for more space to conduct its various programs, a woman approached the table. Chandelle Morris, who lives on Bank Street, sat down at the table with her tray and its modest lunch, a small piece of cake and fruit juice. Morris said she doesn’t have breakfast or dinner most days, relying on her lunch here as her primary meal. “It’s something I look forward to when I get up in the morning,” she said.She thanked Love for what Lunch Break had to offer and turned and said, “They are saving my life.”Love glanced over with smile and thanked Morris for making her point about the work Lunch Break does and the need for the expansion.“We believe Lunch Break can be an instrument in the community to allow people to make it to the next level,” Love said.In June 2011 Justin and Victoria Gmelich, a Rumson couple, donated to Lunch Break two properties on the boulevard, each with a vacant single-family residential home, according to Love.Lunch Break representatives will appear at the borough Zoning Board of Adjustment on Thursday, Sept. 20, with its application to combine those lots and build an addition to the current site.According to the application on file at the borough’s Planning and Zoning Depart­ment, Lunch Break would demolish the existing homes at 113-115 Drs. James Parker Blvd. and use that 7,320-square-foot tract to expand the current 2,989-square-foot facility and build a 2,091-square-foot addition.The addition’s first floor, Love said, will be used, in part, to house Lunch Break’s clothing distribution program. Currently, it operates the program on Saturdays out of the dining area, where individuals and families can come to select free clothing and small household items they need.If the application is approved, the public will be able to drop off donations and pick up items from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays.Lunch Break could also use the site for its other clothing program, called Suited for Success, where clients can get clothing appropriate for job interviews.Along with those programs, Lunch Break would continue to operate its “Internet café” on site, where clients have access to computers and use the Internet connections, often to help locate work.The remainder of the site would be used for administrative offices, file and supply storage and to provide space for the various social service agencies that regularly appear to assist Lunch Break clients.“The new space will allow us to function more efficiently,“ Love said.The addition will “create a one-stop shopping” site for clients, who often don’t have cars or money for mass transit to visit social services offices, Love said.“Business has been too good,” she acknowledged. The facility has been seeing a growing need for services.“With the economy the way it is, with people looking for help, with new people looking for that help, Lunch Break will help them move to that next level in their life,” Love said. “It’s not a handout, it’s a hand up.” By John Burtonlast_img read more

Sea Bright Residents Can Visit Property Monday, Tuesday; 56 Buildings Deemed…

first_imgBy Michele J. KuhnWEST LONG BRANCH – Sea Bright residents will be permitted to check on their homes and retrieve essential items  – according to a set scheduled – on Monday and Tuesday, Nov. 5-6, and most likely will not be able to move back until they have obtained a Certificate of Occupancy.Residents are also bracing for a nor’ester than is predicted to hit the area Wednesday, bringing with it high winds, and heavy rains.While the damage in Sea Bright has been extreme, there has been no loss of life, Mayor Dina Long said. “Thank you…  for hanging in there … for keeping the faith,” he said before requesting a moment of silence and reciting the Pledge of Allegiance.Long held a meeting Sunday afternoon outside in the stadium at Shore Regional High School to update the resident of the borough that was hard-hit by Hurricane Sandy. Hundreds of residents sat on metal bleachers in the chilly air and listened to Long as she and other officials spoke over a bullhorn.The mayor told residents that all properties in the borough had been assessed for damage and that 56 were deemed to be uninhabitable and no admittance could be gained. Others had been deemed as substantially damaged; still others had from little visible damage to varying degrees of damage.“Every single house in Sea bright sustained some damage,” Councilman C. Read Murphy told the shivering crowd.Each borough property has been inspected and its assessment is listed on the borough’s website at www.seabrightnj.org.“We have moved heaven and earth to get you in to your property,” Long said of the schedule officials mapped out for residents to return briefly to their homes.Those living in the northern end of the borough up to the Rumson Bridge may visit their property from 9 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 5. Those with property south of the bridge may visit from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 6.Residents may bring bags to get essential items to the foot of the Rumson Bridge during those hours. There they will be put on shuttle buses and dropped at their property. They will later be picked up and shuttled back to Rumson. “Please do not bring children. Please do not bring pets,” she said. Long also asked that resident not walk around the borough because conditions are still considered dangerous.While visiting their homes, residents can board their windows with plywood and supplies donated by Builder’s General. Borough employees will be able to help residents with the window boarding.While Long said she believed residents with would not be able to go back to their homes with full access for themselves and their cars until Monday, Nov. 12, Councilman James LoBiondo said he believed it could be this Friday, Nov. 9. Long later said she hoped LoBiondo’s assessment was the correct one. She called the situation in Sea Bright “fluid” with changes occurring on a regular basis.LoBiondo reported to the cheers of the residents that all gas leaks had been contained but service would be shut off to half of the borough for up to a month because of the damage to the system.Sewer pumps that were damaged in town were being replaced this week.Water service has not been interrupted and the system would not be shut down because officials wanted to keep the sprinkler systems in buildings with them operational. However, resident who had burst pipes were told they could shut off water to their homes, if it could be safely done.LoBiondo said the fire department has been going door-to-door to look for noticeable water pipe breaks.Crews from Jersey Central Power & Light (JCP&L) were working Sunday in town, along with power company crews from as far away as Ohio, to restore power. They were initially replacing or straightening utility poles and checking their status. Once that was completed, they would begin repairing or restringing power lines.Six feet of sand was blown onto Sea Bright streets and could be fouling various service lines. Crews were working to check them and were looking to see if storm sewer lines needed to have sand blown out of them to help lessen the impact of any flooding from the anticipated storm this week.Councilman Murphy reported that the seawall had been breached in two placed, near Tradewinds and the old Anchorage beach clubs.Murphy praised the mayor and council and said they all had “boots on the ground since day 1” to assist residents and get the borough back to as near normal as possible. Long also praised council members, borough employees, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Monmouth County for its response to the disaster.A representative of FEMA told the crowd that he worked in Washington. D.C. and had worked on other East Coast hurricane recoveries. “I toured your area a couple of days ago,” he said, “and, to be honest with you, it blew me away.” He urged residents to call FEMA (1-800-621-3362) and get a case number so the agency can assist them.Representatives from FEMA will be available on Tuesday at the Fair Haven Fire Department on River Road — where Sea Bright residents are to cast ballots on Election Day — to help answer questions and assist residents. Phones will be avaiable for those who need to contact loved ones or their insurance companies.Long said Bingham Hall, 40 Bingham Ave, in Rumson was a place where residents could go for warm clothing, a hot meal, hot showers and take care of other needs. Food, water and cleaning supplies will also be available at the VNA office at 141 Bodman Place in Red Bank. The mayor urged residents to keep checking the borough’s website for updates and not to believe rumors that have been swirling about.Rescue workers got a bit of a boost Sunday when world class chefs David Burke of David Burke Fromagerie in Rumson, Chris Wood of Woody’s Ocean Grille in Sea Bright, Pat Trama of Ama Ristorante at Driftwood  and others brought food and equipment to the Sea Bright Firehouse and cooked them a meal.last_img read more