After Weinstein Scandal a Plan to Protect Models

first_imgThe Harvey Weinstein news has spurred an outcry on sexual harassment from women far from Hollywood. Now some of that outrage is taking a new shape, beyond the repeated revelations, and has begun to influence the legal system.On Monday, New York State Assemblywoman Nily Rozic, a Democrat from Queens, announced she would introduce an amendment to the state’s current anti-discrimination laws. If passed, it would extend certain protection to models, putting designers, photographers and retailers (among others) on notice that they would be liable for abuses experienced on their watch.Models in New York State would require specific provisions because of their convoluted employment chain. Many are classified as independent contractors, with their agencies claiming to act in an advisory capacity. This means that a client (a photographer, retailer, clothing brand) books them through the agencies but does not actually have a contract directly with the model. Like other independent contractors, including nannies and housekeepers, models have fewer legal protections than workers whose employment contracts are more tightly regulated. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Twitter Trish Goff, a former top model, preparing for a fashion show in New York City in 2004. Ms Goff recently discussed her alleged harassment by Harvey Weinstein with The New York Times. Facebook Advertisement Login/Register With: The spotlight turned to the fashion industry not long after the Weinstein investigations were published in The New York Times and The New Yorker. The model Cameron Russell solicited and began posting anonymous stories from fellow models of their own experiences on her Instagram account, along with the hashtag #MyJobShouldNotIncludeAbuse. Her account is now filled with wrenching stories from both women and men in the industry.READ MORE They have fallen through holes in the existing statutory safety net, including the “incidental booking exception clause.” That means that until now, in New York — regarded as the heart of the American modeling industry — it was unclear where legal liability for job-related sexual harassment lay.“The goal is to push back on the silence that has been so pervasive,” said Ms. Rozic, “and find a legislative solution to change the cycle. Advertisementlast_img

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